Monday, January 18, 2010

Aster

A large genus of mostly perennial plants related to the Daisies that are mostly grown for late season color. Many varieties can be pinched or pruned during early summer to discourage legginess and encourage bushiness just as what is done with Chrysanthemums. Pinching plants of cutting back by half is usually done June 1 to July 1 st if it is to be done.
Most Asters prefer fertile moist, well drained soil that is mulched during the winter. Plants growing on dry soil are much more likely to suffer from Powdery Mildew.
In zones 2 to 4 the bloom season may be cut short if fall freezes arrive early.
Most Asters are good for the Dinner Table cuttings. DEER RESISTANT!
Just like Chrysanthemums, it is recommended to plant them either during early spring or during autumn before they bloom as while they are blooming they will have less energy to put to new root growth and establishment. Either way, adding bonemeal to the planting hole will aid rapid establishment. Propagation from division is easy and plants can be divided every 2 or 3 years during early spring.

* photo taken on August 3 2010 @ University of Guelph Arboretum, Ontario

* photos of unknown internet source





* photos taken on Sep 30 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Oct 21 2014 @ U.S. Botanic Garden, Wash., DC

* photo taken on Sep 17 2015 in Columbia, MD


Aster acuminatus ( Whorled Wood Aster )
Also called Oclemena acuminata. A rhizomatous perennial, reaching a maximum size of 3.3 feet x 57 inches. that is native to cool forests of northeast North America ( from Haliburton, Ontario to Quebec to Newfoundland; south to Pennsylvania to Tennessee ( mountains ) and New Jersey.
The sharply-toothed, elliptical leaves, up to 4 x 2.3 inches in size, are mid-green. The leaves are whorled around the stems.
The white to very pale purple ( with yellow center ) flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are borne mid summer to early autumn.
The stems are hairy.
Hardy zones 3 to 6 in partial shade to full shade on well drained soil.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photo


Aster ageratoides ( Bridal Aster )
A perennial, reaching up to 3.3 feet, that is native to open woods from Russia to Japan; south to India to northern Burma to Taiwan.
The oblong leaves, up to 4.8 x 1.5 inches, are deep green.
The white flowers, up to 0.8 inches wide, are borne early to late autumn.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun on well drained soil.

'Ezo Murasaki'
A rapid growing, stoloniferous, dense, groundcover perennial, reaching up to to 2 x 10 feet in 10 years at Plant Delight Nursery trials.
The oblong leaves, up to 4.8 x 1.5 inches, are deep green.
The abundant, intense mid-purple, frost resistant flowers, up to 0.8 inches across, are borne during mid to late autumn. 'Ashvi' is similar with white flowers.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun on well drained soil.

Aster alpinus ( Alpine Aster )
A spreading perennial, reaching a maximum size of 2 feet x 32 inches, that is abundantly covered in showy, lavender-blue ( with yellow centers ) flowers, up to 4 inches across, during May & June.
It is native to mountains of southern Europe. It has been found naturalized west of Winisk, Ontario near the shores of Hudson Bay.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 5 inches in length, form a dense rosette. The foliage is fuzzy and mid-green.
Hardy zones 2 to 7 in sun to partial sun on well drained soil. An excellent, easy to grow rock garden plant that also goes well at the front of the border and along walls. They are not long lived but often self seed.

* historic archive photo


'Albus'
Reaches up to 12 inches with white flowers in June

'Beechwood'
Abundant, lavender-blue flowers.

'Dark Beauty'
Reaches up to 2 feet x 32 inches with deep violet-blue flowers in June

'Happy End'
Compact growing, reaching up to 1 foot x 32 inches with semi-double, rose-pink flowers in June.

'Wargrave Pink'
Flowers are light pink with purple tinge

Aster amellus ( Italian Aster )
An upright, woody stemmed perennial reaching a maximum size of 32 x 36 inches that is native to Europe ( central France to Poland to Russia; south to northern Italy to the Caucasus ). Slow growing and non-invasive but long lived.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are rough and gray-green.
The flowers, up to 2.4 inches across, are borne in terminal clusters during late summer into autumn.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in sun to partial shade on average or moist well drained soil.
Divide every 3 years.

'Doktor Otto Petsohek'
Reaches up to 2 x 3 feet, bearing very abundant, lavender-blue flowers, up to 1.2 inches wide, during late summer into early autumn.
It is highly rust and mildew resistant.

'King George'
Reaches up to 3 feet, bearing large violet-blue flowers borne late summer to mid autumn.
Mildew resistant.

'Pink Zenith'
Clear pink flowers

'Rudolf Goethe'
Reaches up to 3 x 2 feet with abundant, violet daisies up to 2.5 inches across, borne late summer to mid autumn. The leaves are up to 5 inches in length.
Mildew resistant.

'Violet Queen'
Compact in habit, reaching up to 32 x 36 inches with sprays of large violet-purple daisies that have a yellow eye and are borne July til October.

Aster andersonii ( Anderson's Aster )
Also called Aster alpigenus subsp. andersonii. It is a perennial, reaching up to 16 inches in height, that is native to mountains from Oregon to Nevada, south to northern California.
The ( mostly basal ) leaves, up to 10 inches in length, are linear to narrowly elliptic.
The violet flowers are borne mid to late summer.
Hardy zones 4 to 7

'Anja's Choice'
Reaches up to 2.5 feet with sprays of dainy soft pink flowers that are flushed with white and have golden-yellow centers.
The stems are sturdy and do not need staking.

Aster anomalus ( Manyray Aster )
Also called Symphyotrichum anomalum. A stiffly upright perennial, reaching up to 4 ( rarely over 3 ) feet in height, that is native to the south-central U.S. ( from southeast Kansas to central Illinois; south to eastern Oklahoma to central Arkansas ). It is found in dry open woods in the wild and is endangered in Kansas.
The attractive, smooth-edged, elliptical leaves, up to 3.5 inches long, are bright green.
The bright blue flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are borne during late summer.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 ( possibly 5 ). May self seed readily if not deadheaded.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Aster azureus ( Sky Blue Aster )
Also called Aster oolentangiensis and Symphyotrichum oolentangiense. A perennial, reaching a maximum height of 4 feet, that is native to oak savanna and sandy prairies in eastern North America ( from northeast South Dakota to northern Minnesota to central Michigan to southern Ontario to western New York; south to eastern Texas to central Alabama ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was common around Windsor as well as the Ohio shore; uncommon at Point Pelee during the 1800s. Looks great mixed with Boltonias.
The leaves are up to 3 x 1.5 inches in size.
The pale blue flowers, up to 0.5 inches wide, are borne during late summer.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun on well drained soil.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Aster 'Bridal Veil'
A stunning hybrid of Aster ericioides 'Snow Flurry' and an unknown; origining at the Chicago Botanic Garden. It is an upright to arching perennial, reaching up to 3.3 x 5.7 feet in size. The overall habit resembles that of a Weeping Willow in outline.
The very abundant, pure white flowers, up to 0.5 inches wide, appear early to mid autumn.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on moist, well drained soil. It is highly rust and mildew resistant but moderately prone to deer and rabbit browsing.

Aster carolinianus ( Climbing Aster )
A rhizomatous, long lived, fast growing, woody stemmed vine reaching up to 20 + x 3.5 feet, that is native to forests and swamps in the coastal plain from North Carolina to Florida. Unlike most Asters; this one does not dieback during the winter.
It takes a few years to mature, reaching around 10 feet in 6 years.
The smooth-edged, sword like leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are green.
In mild climates, the foliage will be evergreen, turning to red and purple during winter.
The abundant, fragrant, purple or rose-pink ( with yellow center ) flowers, up to 1.3 inches across, are borne on panicles during early to mid autumn and even lasting until early winter during mild autumns. In very mild climates, it may bloom heavily during autumn then sporadically the remainder of the year.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 ( possibly even hardier - should be tested in zone 5 ) in full sun to partial shade. The Climbing Aster flowers on current seasons growth and looks best if cut back to near groundlevel during early spring. It is not salt tolerant and only well established plants become drought tolerant though only moderately. It requires hot summers to bloom well.

Aster ciliolatis ( Fringed Blue Aster )
Also called Ciliolate Aster, Lindley's Heart-Leaved Aster and Symphyotrichum ciliolatum. A woody-based, rhizomatous perennial, reaching up to 4 feet in height, that is native to boreal forest regions of North America ( from Yukon to Great Slave Lake, N.W.T. to Thompson, Manitoba to Moosonee, Ontario to Labrador; south to Montana to Wyoming to South Dakota to Minnesota to northern Michigan to Wiarton, Ontario to Haliburton, Ontario to New York State to Massachusetts ). In Ontario, it is found as far south as Dorca's Bay on the Bruce Peninsula. It is found in upland woods and rocky north-facing slopes in the wild.
The lance-shaped to oval leaves, up to 11 x 2.8 ( rarely over 5 ) inches in size, are mid-green. The basal leaves are often heart-shaped.
The bright blue ( rarely white or pink ) flowers are borne late summer to mid-autumn.
Hardy zones 2 to 6 in full sun to partial shade on just about any well drained soil.

* photo taken on Sep 29 2013 in Baltimore Co., MD

* photo taken on Oct 17 2013 in Harford Co., MD

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Aster concolor ( Eastern Silvery Aster )
A perennial, reaching a maximum size of 3.5 x 3 ( record is 6 ) feet, that is native to pine-oak grasslands from Kentucky to Massachusetts; south to Tennessee to South Carolina ( highly localized from Louisiana to Georgia and northern Florida ).
It requires fire to survive in its natural range where it has become either rare or extinct ( listed as endangered in Rhode Islands and Massachusetts )
It looks great massed on dry embankments. It is critically endangered in New York State where just a single population remains despite once being much more common.
The oblong or elliptical leaves, up to 2 x 0.6 inches, are silky and silvery.
The violet-blue flowers, up to 0.7 inches across, are borne late summer to early autumn.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in full sun on dry, sandy, well drained soil.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Aster cordifolius ( Blue Wood Aster )
Also called Symphyotrichum cordifolium. A rhizomatous perennial, reaching a maximum size of 6.6 x 6.5 feet, that is native to open, upland, mixed or deciduous woodland in eastern North America ( from eastern North Dakota to central Wisconsin to Sault Ste Marie to Temagami, Ontario to Nova Scotia; south to eastern Oklahoma to central Georgia ). It was abundant on the Ohio shore as well as at Detroit, Michigan during the 1800s.
The coarsely-toothed, cordate, ovate leaves, up to 5 x 3 inches, are deep green. The foliage turns to yellow or red during autumn.
Silvery-blue flowers up to 0.8 inches wide are borne in wide clusters during early to mid autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial shade on average to dry, well drained soil. Excellent for naturalizing under trees. Leaf spot may be a problem in the deep south.

* photos taken on Oct 4 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on July 11 2014 in Washington, DC

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ U.S. Botanical Gardens, Washington, DC

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC

* photos taken on Oct 3 2017 in Columbia, MD

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historical archive photo


'Ideal'
Reaches up to 5 feet in height, with light blue flowers

'Little Carlow'
Reaches up to 4 feet with abundant, very intense lavender-blue flowers borne mid to late fall. Mildew resistant.

* photo taken on Oct 21 2014 @ U.S. Botanical Gardens, Washington, DC


Aster depauperatum ( Serpentine Aster )
Also called Symphyotrichum depauperatum. A 1 to 3 stemmed perennial, that is native to the Blue Ridge of Virginia and serpentine rock outcrops from Reisterstown, Maryland through southeast Pennsylvania. It is endangered in the wild, with most remaining population occurring at Soldier's Delight Natural Environmental Area in Owings Mills, Maryland. Recently an additional population has been found at a single site in Granville County in north-central North Carolina. It can reach up to 1.8 feet in height, through is generally lower on harsh sites. It could make a valuable rock garden plant however digging endangered plants in the wild is illegal. At least on nursery does breed it for cultivation ( see http://www.izelplants.com/symphyotrichum-depauperatum-serpentine-aster.html )
The basal leaves are obovate; the tiny stem leaves are linear.
The white flowers appear late summer into mid-autumn.
Hardy zone 6 to 7 in full sun on serpentine soil ( very well drained with low water holding capability, low calcium and high magnesium and high levels of metals such as nickel and chromium ). While most plants are stunted on serpentine soils, some plants are especially well adapted such as Blackjack Oak, Bear Oak and especially the Serpentine Aster. It may be adaptable to other soils with more nutrients and calcium however this cute little Aster has not been trialed extensively in cultivation. Serpentine Aster is very tolerant of both heat and drought.

* photos taken on Sep 25 2016 near Reisterstown, MD


Aster divaricatus ( White Wood Aster )
Also called Eurybia divaricata. A rhizomatous perennial, reaching a maximum size of 4 x 5.3 feet ( often much shorter ) that is native to dry wooods and mountain forests of central and eastern North America ( from eastern Ohio to the Niagara Region of Ontario to New Hampshire and southern Maine; south to eastern Alabama to northern Georgia ). It is also native to extreme southeastern Quebec. White Wood Aster is endangered in Canada. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was common around Windsor during the 1800s. It occurred only sporadically on the Ohio shore during that time. It is frequently grown in Europe. It makes a great woodland groundcover.
The coarsely-toothed, heart-shape to ovate leaves, up to 7 x 3.5 inches in size, are deep green.
The basal leaves are semi-evergreen.
The medium-size, white daisies, up to 0.8 inches wide, are borne on flat-topped clusters July into October.
Very attractive to butterflies and hummingbirds.
The stems are purple-black.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial shade to shade on most soil types. Drought tolerant and even tolerant of dry shade. Cutting back by half during early June or pinching plants during summer keeps them compact. It does have a potential to self seed and spread. It is highly resistant to rust and mildew.

* photo taken on May 16 2011 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 4 2014 in Baltimore Co., MD

* photo taken on July 11 2014 in Washington, DC

* photos taken @ Smithsonian Inst, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photos taken on Sep 8 2014 in Columbia, MD

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photos taken on Oct 17 2014 in Baltimore Co., MD

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ U.S. Botanical Gardens, Washington, DC

* photo taken on May 3 2015 in Ellicott City, MD

* photos taken on Oct 15 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Aug 12 2016 in Howard Co., MD

* historic archive photo

* photos taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA


'Eastern Star'
Lower growing, reaching a maximum size of 25 x 50 inches, spreading by creeping rhizomes.
The stems are shiny deep mahogany red and the white flowers, up to 1.2 inches wide, are borne early to mid autumn.
The leaves are often deep green than the species.
The foliage is deep blue-green.
Hardy zone 3 to 8

* photos taken on Sep 23 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 5 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photos taken on Aug 5 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


Aster drummondii ( Drummond's Aster )
A perennial, reaching a maximum size of 5 x 6.7 feet, that is native to dry open or rocky woods in North America ( from Iowa to Michigan to Ohio; south to Oklahoma to Louisiana to Alabama ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant around Windsor, southern Essex County, the Lake Erie islands as well as the Ohio shore during the 1800s.
The toothed, cordate, ovate leaves, up to 5.5 x 2.5 ( usually half that ) are mid-green above, lighter beneath.
The abundant, pale lavender to violet ( with yellow center ) flowers, up to 1 inch across, are borne during early to mid autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on dry, well drained soil. Tough and very drought tolerant. It is highly rust and mildew resistant.

* photo taken by Clarence A. Rechenthin @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Aster dumosus
Rapid growing dwarf Asters that thrive best in zones 3 to 8 on rich, moist soil in full sun or partial shade. It thrives in harsh climates including the northern Great Plains. Attracts hummingbirds and butterflies and unfortunately rabbits, but is not generally eaten by deer. They generally flower August into October.
Fertilize in spring and mid summer; these Asters are heavy feeders. It is important to keep plants well watered. Can be divided every one or two years.



'Alert'
Compact growing, reaching up to 1.5 x 3 feet with deep crimson to purple-red daisy-like flowers, up to 1.3 inches across, borne September to November.

'Audrey'
Reaches up to 1 foot with mauve-blue flowers borne early to mid autumn.

'Blue Lagoon'
Reaches up to 2 x 2.5 feet with clear blue flowers, up to 1 inch wide, during late summer into early autumn.
Prefers partial shade. It is highly mildew resistant but prone to rust.

'Dandy'
Reaches up to 12 inches with a purplish-red flowers.

'Jenny'
Reaches up to 32 x 27 ( rarely over 20 ) inches; bearing double red-purple flowers up to 2 inches across, during early autumn.
Mildew prone.

'Kassel'
Reaches up to 14 inches x 2 feet with semi double rose red flowers in autumn.

'Lady in Blue'
Compact, reaching up to 1.5 x 3 feet with light blue, semi-double flowers in August and September.

* photo taken on Aug 29 2013 in Clarksville, MD


'Little Pink Beauty'
Reaches up to 20 inches with bright pink semi-double flowers borne early to mid autumn. Very mildew prone.

'Peter Harrison'
Reaches up to 22 x 42 inches with medium pink daisies in autumn.

'Professor Kippenberg'
Reaches up to 2 x 2.2 feet with semi-double, clear bright blue to blue-purple flowers up to 1 inch wide.
It is highly mildew resistant but prone to rust.

* photo taken on Sep 5 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Sep 17 2015 in Columbia, MD


'Purple Feather'
Violet-purple flowers on a plant to 12 inches.

'Rose Serenade'
Reaches up to 17 inches x 2 feet with soft pink-lavender flowers from August to October

'Snowball'
Forms a mound up to 10 inches x 2 feet with white daisies that have yellow centers.

'White Fairy'
Reaches up to 10 inches x 2 feet with white flowers in August and September.

'White Opal'
Reaches up to 1.5 feet with white flowers.

* photos taken on Aug 29 2013 in Clarksville, MD


'Wood's Blue'
Bushy in habit, reaching a maximum size of 22 x 42 inches with glossy deep green, rust & mildew resistant foliage and bright blue flowers, up to 1.5 inches across. They are borne over a period lasting up to 6 weeks during August and September.

* photos taken on September 2004 in Clarksville, MD



* photos taken on November 10 2010 in Columbia, MD



* photos taken on Sep 22 2013 in Harford Co., MD

* at night

* photos taken on Oct 17 2011 in Howard Co, MD



* photo taken on Sep 19 2014 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC

* photos taken on Sep 5 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Sep 22 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Sep 18 2016 in Columbia, MD


'Wood's Pink'
Bushy in habit, reaching up to 22 x 42 inches, with deep green, rust & mildew resistant foliage and pink flowers. They are borne over a period lasting up to 6 weeks during August and September.

* photo taken on Sep 5 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Sep 23 2013 in Burtonsville, MD

* photo taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC

* photos taken on Sep 17 2015 in Columbia, MD


'Wood's Purple'
Bushy in habit, reaching up to 22 x 42 inches with deep green, rust & mildew resistant foliage and large, bright purple flowers. They are borne over a period lasting up to 6 weeks during August and September.

* photo taken on Sep 5 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Sep 27 2013 in Laurel, MD

* photo taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC


Aster ericoides ( Heath Aster )
Also called Symphotrichum ericioides. A showy, rhizomatous, bushy perennial reaching 3 feet or more ( maximum size of 7 x 3 feet ) that is native to North America ( from Fort Smith, Northwest Territories to Great Slave Lake, N.W.T. to Saskatoon, Sask. to Sioux Lookout, Ontario to Hearst, Ontario to Maine; south to Arizona, Texas, Arkansas to Georgia ). Around Kenora, Ontario; subspecies pansum is usually found in Bur Oak savanna. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was common around Windsor and the Ohio shore; uncommon at Point Pelee and the Lake Erie islands during the 1800s. It was abundant at Detroit, Michigan during presettlement times.
The linear leaves are up to 3 inches in length.
The abundant white flowers up to 0.8 inches in width are borne in panicles in late autumn though have been recorded from July to as late as December. The flowers attract butterflies.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 in sun to partial shade on moist, well drained soil. It tolerates harsh climates including Alberta, Canada. Extremely drought tolerant. It is highly rust and mildew resistant but moderately prone to deer and rabbit browsing.

* photo taken on Oct 17 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Sep 14 2013 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC

* photos taken on Oct 24 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Oct 16 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Sep 21 2016 in Columbia, MD

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo taken by Clarence A. Rechenthin @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


'Blue Star'
A bushy strong growing perennial up to 3.5 x 4.2 feet with abundant, light blue, star-shaped daisies, up to 0.5 inche wide, borne early to late autumn.
It is prone to rust but is very mildew resistant.
Foliage is mildew resistant!
Hardy north to zone 3 and drought tolerant.

'Delight'
White flowers

'Earl King'
Reaches up to 4 x 4.6 feet with small heather-like foliage that is covered in soft blue flowers up to 0.5 inche wide, during autumn.
It is very resistant to rust and mildew.

'Enchantress'
Reaches up to 16 inches with upright stems bearing completely mildew free heather-like foliage. Plants are covered completely by the profuse light pink daisies in late summer to autumn.

'Esther'
Reaches up to 2 feet with profuse light pink daisies that cover the heather-like foliage all autumn long. Prefers dry sandy soil.

'Pink Cloud'
Forms a bushy mound up to 7 x 3 feet. The very mildew resistant foliage is covered in drifts of pastel pink flowers August into October.
The attractive foliage is bronze before turning to green.

'Ringdove'
Rosey pink flowers

'Snow Flurry'
A fast growing, dense, low perennial, reaching up to 1 x 4 feet with white flowers that have a yellow eye.
The very abundant flowers, up to 0.5 inches across, smother the plant.
Excellent for groundcover or trailing over a wall. It is highly resistant to rust and mildew.

* photo taken on Sep 30 2014 in Burtonsville, MD


Aster farreri
A perennial native to Tibet that reaches up to 2 x 3 feet.
Violet solitary flowers up to 2 inches across are borne in early summer.
Hardy north to zone 5

Aster faurei
Also called Aster spathulifolius & Aster tataricus var faurei. It is a rhizomatous perennial, reaching up to 5 feet in height, that is native to Sakhalin.
The leaves are up to 24 inches in length.
The purple-blue daisies, up to 2 inches across, are borne in late autumn. The flowers attract butterflies and hummingbirds.
Hardy zones 5 to 7 in full sun. Flood tolerant. Deer resistant.

Aster fendleri ( Fendler's Aster )
A woody based perennial, reaching up to 1.5 feet x 15 inches, that is native to grasslands in the south central U.S. ( northcentral Colorado to central Nebraska; south to New Mexico to northern Texas )
The linear leaves, up to 2 x 0.1 inches, are glossy deep green.
The white, blue or purple ( with yellow center ) flowers are borne summer to late autumn.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun on very well drained soil. Too much water can cause death by root rot. Deer resistant and drought tolerant.

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Aster x frikartii
A group of upright, mildew resistant, very sturdy hybrid Asters ( Aster amellus x A. thomsonii ) that reach up to 4 x 3.3 feet and bloom continuously from July through October. The fragrant, abundant flowers, up to 3.2 inches wide, are typically lavender-blue. Prefers good drainage ( especially in winter ) and being planted in spring. Excellent for use in borders.
The lance-shaped leaves are deep green.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun to partial shade. Sometimes needs staking however cutting plants back by half during late spring should make them more compact thus eliminating this need. Should be divided every 3 years, do not divide or cut back during autumn north of zone 6.

'Flora's Delight'
Reaches up to 1.7 x 3.5 feet with single lilac-pink flowers with a yellow eye.
Looks best if cut back after flowering.

'Monch'
Reaches up to 4 x 4 feet with abundant, violet-blue flowers with golden centers over an extremely long season from June into November.
Mildew resistant and tolerates harsh climates including Alberta, Canada.

'Wunder von Stafa'
Long-lived, reaching up to 4 x 3.5 feet with large, light blue flowers up to 3 inches across lasting over a long period from mid summer to late autumn.
Mildew resistant.
Similar to 'Monch' but more upright.

Aster georgianus ( Georgia Aster )
Also called Aster patens var georgianus. A very attractive, bushy, rhizomarous, perennial, reaching a maximum size of 4 feet x 80 inches, that is native to the Piedmont of the southeastern U.S. ( from central Alabama to central Georgia to south central North Carolina ). It is extremely endangered in the wild and continues to decline, around only 60 populations remain and most of those are very small.
The majority of its wild habitat is Post Oak savanna which is heavily dependent upon fire to maintain this ecosystem.
It should be introduced into cultivation on a mass scale as it makes an excellent attractive landscape plant.
The thick, smooth-edged, lance to oblanceolate leaves, up to 3 x 0.8 inches, are deep green. The leaves clasp the stems.
The profuse, violet flowers, up to 2.5 inches across, are borne in large heads during mid to late autumn.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in full sun on dry, well drained soil. Very drought tolerant.

Aster grandiflorus ( Large Flowered Aster )
A rhizomatous, bushy, clumping perennial, reaching a maximum size of 3.8 x 6 feet, that is native from Virginia to Florida. It is typically found in open acidic pine and hardwood mix forests.
The leaves are narrow and small.
The blue-violet flowers, up to 2 ( rarely over 1.3 ) inches across, are borne on large heads during mid to late autumn.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on well drained soil. Drought tolerant bur southern seed source may not grow in the north. Cut back during July for shorter plants.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Aster laevis ( Smooth Aster )
Also called Symphyotrichum laeve. A perennial, reaching a maximum size of 5 x 4 ( rarely over 3 ) feet, that is native to central and eastern North America ( from Yukon to northern Alberta to The Pas, Manitoba to Sioux Lookout, Ontario to Chapleau, Ontario to Maine; south to New Mexico to Georgia ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant around Windsor as well as the Ohio shore; uncommon at Point Pelee during the 1800s. It was abundant at Detroit, Michigan during presettlement era.
The oblong leaves, up to 7 x 1.2 ( rarely over 4 ) inches in size, are deep blue-green.
The very abundant, showy, violet-blue flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are borne late summer often lasting into late fall.
Very attractive to Butterflies, especially the Monarch.
Hardy zones 2 to 9 in sun or partial shade and most well drained soils. Very drought tolerant and mildew resistant.
Pinch back during early summer to control height.

* photos taken on July 17 2011 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 2 2011 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on Oct 1 2014 in Howard Co., MD

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historical archive photo


'Bluebird'
Reaches up to 5 x 6 ( rarely over 4 ) feet forming a sturdy, vase shaped clump with very mildew resistant blue-green foliage.
The abundant, single, deep sky-blue ( centered golden-yellow ) flowers, up to an inch across, borne in clusters during September and October. The red stems are strong and upright.
Highly resistant to mildew and rust.

* photos taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photos taken on Oct 17 2011 in Howard Co, MD


* photo taken on Oct 1 2014 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ U.S. Botanical Gardens, Washington, DC

* photo taken on Oct 1 2016 in Columbia, MD


'Calliope'
More vigorous, reaching up to 6.5 x 6 feet with black stems.
The larger, violet-blue flowers are up to 1.8 inches across.
Hardy north to zone 3. It is prone to rust but is very mildew resistant.

'Climax'
Reaches up to 7 feet, with broad leaves and blue flowers borne early to mid autumn.
Mildew resistant.

'White Climax'
A white flowering version of 'Climax'.

Aster lanceolatus ( Panicled Aster )
Also called Symphyotrichum lanceolatum var. lanceolatum. A fast growing, rhizomatous, airy, wiry perennial, reaching a maximum size of 6.5 x 5.8 feet, that is native to moist low woods of North America ( from northern Alberta to The Pas, Manitoba to Sandy Lake, Ontario to Winisk, Ontario to Saguenay, Quebec to Prince Edward Island; south to Arkansas to South Carolina ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was locally common in southern Essex County and the Lake Erie islands during the 1800s. It was abundant at Detroit, Michigan and very abundant on the Ohio shore during that time.
The smooth-edged, lance-shaped leaves, up to 5 x 1.3 inches, are mid-green, turning to purple during autumn.
The white to light violet ( with yellow center ) flowers are up to 1 inch across, borne early to late autumn and are very frost tolerant.
The stems are black.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 in partial to full shade on moist soil. Flood tolerant and moderately salt tolerant. Slightly prone to mildew.

* photos taken on Oct 1 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Oct 24 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Oct 3 2017 in Columbia, MD
* photo taken by Joe F. Duft @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Aster lateriflorus ( Calico Aster )
Also called Symphyotrichum lateriflorum. An upright, bushy perennial, reaching a maximum size of 4 x 5 ( reports of 5 ) feet, that is native to eastern North America ( from Minnesota to Rainy River, Ontario around the north shore of Lake Superior to Hearst, Ontario to Nova Scotia; south to Arkansas to Georgia ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant around Windsor and southern Essex County as well as the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It was also abundant at Detroit, Michigan during that time.
The lance-shaped leaves are up to 6 x 1 inches in size. The older foliage is purplish-green.
The abundant, pale lilac flowers, up to 0.6 inches wide, are borne on sprays over a season lasting up to 4 weeks during late summer into mid-autumn. The flowers are highly attractive to butterflies.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun on fertile, well drained soil. It is drought tolerant. The species and all cultivars are highly rust and mildew resistant.

* photo taken on Oct 1 2014 in Columbia, MD

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photos taken on Oct 16 2014 in Ellicott City, MD

* photos taken on Oct 24 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Sep 23 2016 in Columbia, MD


'Horizontalis'
Reaches up to 3 feet with deep purplish-green leaves and pale lilac pink flowers borne early to late autumn. Has a great shape and looks great even when not in bloom.

'Lady in Black'
Very vigorous, reaching up to 6 x 4.6 ( rarely over 4 ) feet with deep red-purple to purplish-black foliage.
The abundant, white daisies have purplish-red centers and are borne September and October.

'Prince'
Reaches up to 2 feet in height, with foliage that is deep bronze-purple at first, turning to deep green.
The flowers are pink with white centers.

Aster linarifolius ( Bristly Aster )
Also called Ionactis linarifolius. A tussock forming perennial, reaching a maximum size of 2 x 2 feet, that is native to sandy pine-oak woods in eastern North America ( from Minnesota to Maine; south to Texas to Georgia ).
The whorled, narrow, pointed, needle-like leaves, up to 2 x 0.1 inches in size, are mid-green.
The violet-blue ( eyed yellow ) flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are borne mid-summer to mid-autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun on well drained soil. Very soil tolerant, it will even grow on pure gravel. Pinch plants back during late spring for bushy habit.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ U.S. Botanical Gardens, Washington, DC

* historic archive photo


Aster linosyris ( Goldilocks )
A perennial reaching up to 2.5 feet x 20 inches, with rayless, button-like yellow flowers up to 0.6 inches across that are borne in dense corymbs.
The flowers are borne late summer into early autumn.
The leaves are very narrow.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun on well drained soil. Easy to grow. Mildew resistant.

Aster macrophyllus ( Large Leaved Aster )
A large rhizomatous spreading perennial reaching a maximum size of 6 x 6 feet, that is native to woodlands of eastern North America ( from northern Minnesota to Dryden, Ontario to Lake Nipigon, Ontario to Kapuskasing, Ontario to Nova Scotia; south to Illinois to Delaware...to North Carolina in mountains ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was uncommon at Point Pelee and the Lake Erie islands during the 1800s.
The large, toothed, heart shaped basal leaves are up to 10 x 12 inches.
The young leaves can be used either as a pot herb or fresh in salads.
The pale blue flowers up to 1.5 inches across are borne July to October.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 preferring partial shade and tolerates deep and dry shade. Potentially invasive on some sites. It is highly resistant to mildew but is prone to rust.

* photos taken on July 14 2016 in Tobermory, ON

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photos taken on July 27 2015 in Bayfield, ON

* historic archive photo


'Albus'
Same except for white flowers

'Twilight'
Reaches up to 3 feet with mildew resistant foliage and violet flowers, up to 1.3 inches across.

Aster nemoralis ( Bog Aster )
A perennial, reaching up to 3 x 3.3 feet, that is native to peat bogs in northeastern North America ( from northern Ontario to Labrador & Newfoundland; south to Michigans Upper Peninsula to Pennsylvania to Maryland ). It is endangered in Connecticut & Pennsylvania, extinct in Delaware. Rare in Ontario.
The smooth-edged, tapered, linear to lance-shaped leaves, are up to 2.3 x 0.3 inches.
The light violet-purple flowers, up to 1 inch across, are borne early autumn.
Hardy zones 2 to 6 in full sun on wet acidic soil.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Aster nova-angliae ( New England Aster )
Also called Symphyotrichum novae-angliae. A bushy, large perennial reaching a maximum size of 10 x 5 ( rarely over 6 ) feet that is a widespread native to North America ( from Alberta to Sault Ste Marie to Manitoulin Island to Tobermory, Ontario to Haliburton, Ontario to Quebec; south to Colorado, Kansas to Delaware ). In the Windsor/Essex County region; it was common around Windsor and the Canard River Valley as well as the Ohio shore; uncommon on Point Pelee and the Lake Erie islands during the 1800s. It was also abundant on the Lake Erie shore as well as Detroit, Michigan during presettlement era.
The lance-shaped leaves are up to 5 inches in length.
The flowers up to 2 inches across are borne in loose corymbs from July into October.
They are very attractive to butterflies and hummingbirds.
Fast growing Asters for sun to partial shade that are hardy zones 2 to 8. Tolerant of wet soil but also temporary drought. It thrives in harsh climates including the northern Great Plains. Use lower plants in front to hide bare stems. Disease free other than Powdery Mildew which can sometimes be a problem. Should be divided every 2 or 3 years though can thrive much longer than Aster novi-belgii without division. Deer resistant. Stems can be cut back a foot or so during mid-June for a plant that is shorter and sturdier at bloom time.

* photos taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.





* photos taken on Sep 14 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Sep 15 2013 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on Oct 1 2013 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on Oct 1 2014 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on Sep 18 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD

* photo taken on Sep 23 2016 in Columbia, MD

* historic archive photos


'Alma Poltske'
A large perennial reaching up to 4.3 x 5 feet.
It bears abundant, glowing red-pink flowers, up to 2 inches wide, from August until frost.
The mildew resistant leaves are up to 5 inches in length. Cut back by half in June for compactness.



'Barr's Blue'
Reaches up to 4.6 x 5.8 feet, with violet flowers up to 2 inches across. It is generally mildew resistant.

* photos taken on Sep 15 2013 in Howard Co., MD


Bill's Big Blue'
Vigorous, reaching up to 5 x 4.3 feet, bearing intense mid-blue flowers, up to 1 inch wide, during early to mid autumn.
It is highly rust and mildew resistant.

'Chilly Winds'
Reaching up to 6.5 x 4 feet with abundant, large white flowers up to 1.5 inches across.

'Harrington Pink'
Reaching up to 6 x 5 feet with pink daisies from September into October.
Mildew resistant.

'Hella Lacy'
Reaches a maximum size of 52 inches x 4 feet, with very abundant, violet-blue flowers up to 1.7 inches across.
The lance-shaped foliage is deep green.
It is highly rust resistant but very prone to mildew.

* photos taken on Sep 30 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ U.S. Botanic Garden, Wash., DC


'Honeysong Pink'
Reaches a maximum size of 5 x 4 feet, with abundant, clear pink flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, from late summer into early autumn.
It is highly rust resistant but only moderately resistant to mildew.

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC


'Kylie'
Reaches up to 3.8 x 3.3 feet, bearing abundant, bright pink flowers, up to 0.7 inches wide. It is actually a hybrid between the New England & Heath Asters.
The narrow, deep green foliage is highly rust and mildew resistant..

'Pink Winner'
Reaches up to 3 feet bearing medium pink flowers borne on dense, large heads during mid to late autumn.
Mildew resistant.

'Purple Dome'
Compact in habit, reaching a maximum size of 4 feet x 3.6 ( rarely over 2.5 ) feet, bearing masses of abundant, 1.7 inch semi-double, violet-purple daisies from August to October that attract butterflies.
The deep green foliage is rust and mildew resistant.
Rarely needs staking.

* photos taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.



* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ U.S. Botanical Gardens, Washington, DC

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC

* photo taken on Jun 24 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken Aug 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD

* photo taken on Oct 2 2016 in Harford Co., MD

* photo taken on Oct 16 2016 in Beltsville, MD

* photo taken on Oct 9 2017 in Columbia, MD


'Red Cloud'
Very vigorous, reaching up to 6.5 feet, bearing intense purplish-pink flowers, up to 1.7 inches across., during early to mid autumn.

'September Ruby'
Fast growing, reaching up to 5 x 5 ( rarely over 3.5 ) feet with abundant, deep red flowers, up to 1.5 inches wide, during early to mid autumn.

'Skyscraper'
A long-lived, fast growing, huge Aster, reaching up to 6 x 6 feet.
It profusely bears huge, intense lavender flowers, up to 3 inches across, over the longest season of any cultivar, often lasting from early or mid summer well into autumn.

'Wedding Lace'
Reaches up to 5.3 x 4.5 feet with abundant, white daisies, up to 1.7 inches wide, during early autumn.
It is highly rust resistant but prone to mildew.

Aster novi-belgii ( New York Aster )
Also called Symphyotrichum novi-belgii. Fast growing perennials native to the east coast from Newfoundland to Georgia, that reach up to 6.6 x 4 feet. It has been reported to be native further west at Moosonee, Ontario. It was reported as abundant at Detroit, Michigan during the late 1800s but it is unknown if these were native populations.
The narrow, lance-shaped leaves are up to 7 x 1 inches in size. The foliage is mid-green.
The typically blue-violet flowers are up to 2 inches in width and typically appear September into October unless otherwise noted. The flowers attract butterflies.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 in sun to partial shade on moist, fertile soil. It thrives in harsh climates including the northern Great Plains. Lower growing red-purple cultivars are excellent companion plants to Amsonia hubrechtii. May be prone to Aster Wilt, rust, mildew and unfortunately also rabbits on some sites. Should be divided every 2 years during late fall or early spring. Stems can be cut back a foot or so during mid-June for a plant that is shorter and sturdier at bloom time.

* photos taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.



* photos taken on Sep 23 2016 in Columbia, MD

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photos

Aster novi-belgii cultivars

'Amanda'
Rich violet flowers.

'Beechwood Rival'
Reaches up to 3 feet with wine red flowers in September

'Blondie'
Reaches up to 3 feet, with pure white semi double flowers are borne in September.
The deep green foliage is mildew prone.

'Blue Gown'
Reaches up to 4.2 x 4.3 feet with clear blue daisies up to 1.3 inches wide.

'Bonningdale White'
Reaches up to 4 feet with double white flowers up to 1.5 inches across.
It is highly rust resistant but prone to mildew.

'Carnival'
Up to 32 inches in height with large red-purple, semi-double flowers.
The deep green foliage is mildew prone.

'Coombe Rosemary'
Vigorous, reaching up to 3.3 feet with profuse double violet-purple flowers.

'Diana'
Reaches up to 2 feet with rose-pink flowers.

* photo taken on Sep 16 2013 in Columbia, MD

'Eventide'
Reaches up to 4 feet, with violet-blue, semi-double flowers.

'Marie Ballard'
Reaches up to 3.5 x 3 feet. bearing double, light blue flowers up to 2 inches across.

* photos taken on Oct 22 2015 in Columbia, MD


'Mt. Everest'
Reaches up to 5.5 feet with 2 inch white semi-double flowers borne late summer to mid-autumn.

'Patricia Ballard'
Compact in habit, reaching up to 3.3 x 2.2 feet, bearing rosy-pink, semi-double flowers up to 1.7 inches wide during early to mid autumn.

* photos taken on Sep 16 2013 in Columbia, MD


'Raspberry Swirl'
Vigorous and compact, reaching up to 2 feet.
The foliage is mildew resistant.
The intense purplish-red flowers are borne late summer into early autumn.

'Richness'
Reaches a maximum size of 3 x 6 feet, bearing mid-violet flowers, up to 1.3 inches across.

'Royal Ruby'
Compact, reaching up to 2 feet with abundant, semi-double, deep red flowers.

'Sailor Boy'
Reaches up to 3.5 feet with deep blue daisies. Rhizomatous.

* photo taken on Sep 16 2013 in Columbia, MD


'Violet Carpet'
A spreading, low, compact form; reaching just 1 x 3 feet.
The violet-blue flowers are up to 1 inch wide.
It has excellent rust and mildew resistance.

'Winston Churchill'
Reaches up to 3.5 x 2.5 feet with single bright red daisies during early to mid autumn. Early blooming compared to species.

Aster oblongifolius ( Aromatic Aster )
A fast growing, rhizomatous, compact, bushy, mounding perennial, reaching up to 3 x 3.3 ( up to x 5.5 for var angustatus ) feet, that is a widespread U.S. native ( from eastern Montana to northwest Minnesota to central Wisconsin to northeast Ohio to south-central New York State; south to New Mexico to Texas to central Alabama to northern Virginia ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was locally common around Windsor during the 1800s. It is now extinct in the wild in Canada; endangered in Indiana, Ohio and North Carolina. It was abundant at Detroit, Michigan during presettlement era.
The smooth-edged, oblong leaves, up to 4 x 0.8 ( rarely over 3 ) inches in size, are blue-green. The foliage is fragrant.
The lavender-blue ( with yellow center ) flowers, up to 1.3 inches across, are borne early to late autumn. It is one of the large North American wildflowers to bloom in the fall and the bloom season lasts up to 2 months. The flowers attract butterflies.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 in full sun on dry to average, well drained soil. Tolerant of alkaline, sand, clay soils as well as seashore conditions. Very drought tolerant. Rarely bothered by pest or disease other than occasional mildew. Shear during early summer fore denser habit.

* photos taken on Sep 15 2013 in Howard Co., MD

* photo taken on Sep 23 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken by Clarence A. Rechenthin @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


'Dream of Pink'
Reaches up to 1 x 2.5 feet, with abundant, pale pink flowers.

'Fanny'
Reaches a maximum size of 4 x 8 ( rarely over 3 x 5 ) feet, bearing masses of abundant, violet-blue flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, from September into November.

* photos taken on Oct 1 2013 in Howard Co., MD


'October Skies'
A strong growing, low bushy mound up to 3 x 4.2 feet ( foliage up to 1.5 feet in height ). The intense, mid blue flowers, up to 1.3 inches across, are borne from September on for up to 13 weeks. The foliage is bright green.
Very drought and poor soil tolerant.

* photos taken on Sep 14 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC

* photos taken on Sep 23 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Oct 16 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Sep 23 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Oct 3 2016 in Columbia, MD<br />

* photo taken on Oct 3 2017 in Columbia, MD


'Raydon's Birthday Pink'
An upright, bushy plant reaching up to 3.2 x 6 feet that is covered in very abundant single, light pink flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, during early to mid autumn.
It is highly rust and mildew resistant.

'Raydon's Favorite'
An upright, bushy plant reaching up to 3.2 x 6 feet that is covered in very abundant single, violet-blue flowers, up to 1.7 inches across, lasting from September late into autumn. Mildew resistant.

* photo taken on Aug 25 2013 @ University of Maryland, College Park

* photos taken on Sep 15 2013 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ U.S. Botanical Gardens, Washington, DC

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC

* photos taken on Oct 10 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Oct 13 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Oct 17 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Oct 19 2015 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on Oct 22 2015 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on Nov 4 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Nov 4 2016 in Columbia, MD


Aster paludosus ( Southern Prairie Aster )
Also called Aster hemisphaerica. A spectacular, rhizomatous perennial, reaching a maximum size of 3 feet x 44 inches, that is native to open woods and savannas in the eastern U.S. ( from Kansas to Kentucky; south to Texas to Florida ).
The narrow leaves, up to 4.2 x 0.25 inches, are glossy deep green.
The abundant, deep violet-blue ( with yellow center ) flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are borne during early to mid autumn.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on well drained soil. Drought tolerant. Prune during early summer for denser habit.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Aster patens ( Purple Aster )
A perennial, reaching a maximum size of 5 x 2 ( rarely over 4 ) feet, that is native to dry rocky habitats in eastern North America ( from central Kansas to central Illinois to northeast Ohio to western New York to southern New Hampshire and southern Maine; south to central Texas to far northern Florida ). It is endangered in New Hampshire and extinct in Maine. It occurred around Niagara Falls during the 1800s but has since gone extinct there.
The leaves, up to 3 x 1.2 ( rarely over 2.3 x 0.8 ) inches, are deep green.
The dark violet flowers, up to 1.3 inches across, are borne on panicles during late summer to mid autumn.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on well drained soil. Very drought tolerant. Slightly mildew prone.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photo


Aster pilosus ( Frost Aster )
Also called Aster pilosum. A perennial, reaching a maximum size of 5.5 x 4 feet, that is native to prairies in eastern North America ( from northeast South Dakota to Michigan's Upper Peninsula to Tobermory, Ontario to southeast Quebec to Nova Scotia; south to central Oklahoma to central Louisiana to central Georgia & South Caroline ).
The narrow lance-shaped leaves are up to 4 x 0.8 inches in size.
The white flowers, up to 0.7 inches across, are borne in loose open inflorescences during early to mid autumn. The flowers persist over a season lasting up to 1.5 months.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun on well drained soil. Very soil tolerant, tolerating even pure sand and gravel. It is also drought tolerant. Mildew resistant.

* photo taken by Jennifer Anderson @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database
* photo taken by Robert H. Mohlenbrock @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo taken on Sep 18 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD


Aster prenanthoides ( Crooked Stemmed Aster )
A rhizomatous perennial, reaching a maximum size of 4 x 7.5 feet, that is native to moist to swampy woods in eastern North America ( from central Iowa to southeast Minnesota to central Wisconsin to the north shore of Lake Erie to Vermont; south to southern Illinois to northern Alabama to northern Georgia to central Virginia ). It is endangered in Ontario, Alabama, Georgia, Delaware, New Jersey and Massachusetts. It is extinct in the wild in Connecticut. It occurred sporadically on the Ohio shore during the 1800s.
The narrow leaves are up to 2.8 x 0.8 inches.
The violet-blue ( with yellow center ) flowers, up to 1 inches across, are borne late summer to mid autumn.
The stems zigzag.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in full sun to partial shade on moist soil. Tolerant of clay soil and occasional flooding but not drought.

* photo taken by Robert H. Mohlenbrock @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Aster pringlei ( Pringle's Aster )
Also called Aster pilosus var pringlei and Symphyotrichum pilosum var. pringlei. It is a moderate growing, densely branched perennial, reaching a maximum size of 6.6 x 3 ( rarely over 5 ) feet, that is native to northeastern North America ( from Wisconsin to Manitoulin Island to Massachusetts & Vermont. In Ontario, it is extremely rare outside of Manitoulin Island. It is known to have occurred locally on the Lake Erie islands and Ohio shore during the 1800s.
The needle-like leaves, up to 0.6 inches in length, are bright green.
The very showy, white flowers, up to 0.7 inches across, are borne late summer to early autumn.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in full sun on fertile, moist, well drained soil. Drought tolerant.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


'Monte Cassino'
Forms a fast growing, sturdy, upright clump, up to 4 x 3 feet, with delicate textured tiny green foliage that turns bronze in autumn.
The abundant, starry, small white flowers are borne over a long season lasting from September and sometimes late into autumn.

Aster ptarmicoides ( Upland White Aster )
A handsome, mounding perennial, reaching up to 2 x 2 feet, that is native to dry prairies and savannas in North America ( from Candle Lake, Saskatchewan to the north shore of Lake Superior to Sault Ste Marie to Killarney, Ontario to southeast Quebec and New York State; south to Colorado to Oklahoma to South Carolina ). It is extremely rare to absent over much of its range and it is very isolate in the east and southeast.
The linear to lance-shaped leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are deep green.
The very abundant, white flowers, up to 0.7 inches across, are borne mid summer into early autumn. The flowers are followed by attractive silvery-white seedheads.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun on dry, sandy well drained soil or limestone outcrops. Extremely heat and drought tolerant.
It is know to hybridize with Goldenrod - unusual for an Aster.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photo


Aster puniceus ( Purple Stem Aster )
Also called Bog Aster and Symphyotrichum puniceum. A vigorous perennial reaching up to 8 x 15 ( rarely over 7 x 6 ) feet that is native to swamps in North America ( from centra British Columbia to northern Alberta to northern Manitoba to Moosonee, Ontario to Newfoundland; south to Alabama and Georgia ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant in southern Essex County including Point Pelee during the 1800s. It was also abundant at Detroit, Michigan but sporadic on the Ohio shore during that time.
The lance-shaped to oblong leaves are up to 8 ( rarely over 6 ) inches in length.
The showy, violet-blue flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are borne early to mid autumn.
The hairy stems are reddish in color.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 in full sun to partial shade. Very drought tolerant.

* photo taken by Robert H. Mohlenbrock @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photos


'Eric's Big Blue'
Reaches up to 8 x 3 feet with purple-blue flowers.
Hardy zones 4 to 8.

Aster retroflexus ( Rigid White Top Aster )
A perennial, reaching a maximum size of 45 inches x 2.5 feet, that is native to open pine-oak woods in the Blue Ridge Mountains in the southeastern U.S. ( from eastern Tennessee to western North Carolina; south to northern Georgia & western South Carolina ).
The ovate to spatulate leaves are up to 4.5 x 1.6 inches in size.
The violet-blue flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, appear early to mid autumn.

Aster schreberi ( Schreber's Aster )
A perennial, reaching a maximum height of 4 feet, that is native to moist woodland in eastern North America ( from eastern Iowa to southern Wisconsin to the north shore of Lake Erie to central Vermont to southern Maine; south to central Illinois to central Kentucky to eastern Tennessee to central Virginia ). It is endangered in Maryland, found only in Baltimore and Cecil Counties despite occurring in all nearby suburban DC counties in Virginia. It is also endangered in Ontario, Wisconsin, Indiana, Tennessee and Delaware. It has become extinct in Iowa, Michigan and Maine. It is similar to Aster divaricatus but is similar in all its parts.
The coarsely-toothed, cordate, broadly-ovate leaves are up to 6 inches in length. The foliage is mid-green above, silvery beneath.
The white ( centered yellow ) flowers, up to 1 inch across, are borne late summer into early autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in partial shade ( tolerates full shade ) on moist, fertile, well drained soil.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Aster sedifolius ( Rhone Aster )
Also called Aster acris. A vigorous, bushy, non-invasive perennial, reaching a maximum size of 4 x 3 ( rarely over 3 ) feet, that is native to southern Europe ( France to Russia; south to Portugal to the Caucasus ).
It looks great planted in groups.
The leaves are linear.
The masses of starry, lavender-blue to purple-blue ( with yellow center ) flowers, up to 1.2 inches across, are borne in dense corymbs during late summer to late autumn.
Hardy zones 2 to 7 in full sun to partial shade and east to grow on most soils. Drought tolerant, deer and mildew resistant.
It sometimes requires staking.

'Nanus'
A billowy dwarf perennial, only reaching up to 2 x 2 feet with mildew resistant foliage and masses of starry blue flowers August to October. This tough perennial is highly recommended for the Canadian Prairies.

Aster sericeus ( Silky Aster )
Also called Western Silvery Aster. A bushy, erect perennial, reaching up to 3 x 2.6 ( rarely over 2 ) feet, that is native to prairies and oak savanna in central North America ( from North Dakota & southern Manitoba to Kenora and Rainy Lake in western Ontario to western lower Michigan to central Ohio; south to central Texas to Arkansas to Indiana ). It is highly endangered in Manitoba, Michigan and Ontario. The swollen woody rootstock enables this plant to survive prairie fires.
The smooth-edged, lance-shaped to ovate leaves, up to 1.7 x 0.5 inches, are silky silvery-green.
The lavender-purple to violet-blue ( with golden-yellow center ) flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are borne late summer through fall.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 in full sun on dry, sandy, well drained soil. It is very drought tolerant and will even grow on limestone, pure sand or gravel; too much water will easily kill this plant. It is highly rust and mildew resistant.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photo


Aster shortii ( Short's Aster )
A clumping ( non-rhizomatous ) perennial, reaching up to 4 x 2 feet, that is native to eastern North America ( from southwest Iowa to southeast Minnesota to central Wisconsin to southern Michigan to far southern Ontario to central Pennsylvania; south to central Mississippi to central Georgia to central Maryland ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was uncommon at Point Pelee and the Lake Erie Islands; abundant on the Ohio shore during the 1800s.
The very abundant, showy violet-blue flowers, up to 1 inch across, are borne early autumn until frost.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial shade on just about any well drained soil. It is often found in dry Oak-Hickory forests in the wild but will grow on moister sites Tolerant of limestone.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photo


Aster spectabilis ( Showy Aster )
Also called Seaside Aster. A mat forming perennial reaching a maximum size of 3 x 6 feet, that native to eastern North America from Massachussets to North Carolina.
The toothed leaves up to 5 inches in length are deep green and leathery.
The very large, violet to blue flowers, up to 2.3 ( rarely over 1.6 ) inches across, are borne in early autumn.
Attracts butterflies.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun on hot, dry, sandy, well drained soils. Tolerant of drought and tree root competition. Disease resistant.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Aster tataricus ( Tatarian Aster )
A sturdy, massive perennial reaching a maximum size of 9 x 4 feet that is native to Mongolia to eastern Siberia; south to northern China to Japan.
The elliptical to oblong leaves are up to 26 x 6 inches in size. The foliage is mid-green.
The purple-blue daisies, up to 1.3 inches wide, are borne during late autumn. The flowers attract butterflies and hummingbirds.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in sun or shade. Flood tolerant. Deer resistant.
Plant is reported to have antiseptic properties that kill staph.

* photo taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photo of unknown internet source

* historical archive photo


'Jindai'
Sturdy and compact, to 6 x 4 ( rarely over 4.5 ) feet however with sometimes invasive rhizomes. Foliage is deep green, disease free and remains attractive all season long. Sky blue daisy-like flowers are borne from September to November for up to 3 months.

* photo taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


* photos taken on Sep 28 2011 in Columbia, MD


* photo taken on Aug 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, Washington, DC

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC


Aster thibeticus
Similar to Aster alpina with bright blue flowers.

Aster tongolensis
A long-lived, carpet-forming perenial, reaching up to 2 feet, that is native to mountain meadows in western China.
The attractive, oval foliage is hairy deep green.
The lilac-blue flowers, up to 2.3 inches wide, are borne late spring to early summer.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun or light shade on just about any moist, deep, rich, well drained soil. Great for containers. It is highly resistant to rust and mildew.

* photo taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery

* photo taken on May 20 2017 in Pikesville, MD


'Napsbury'
Reaches up to 1.2 x 2 feet, bearing stunning, huge, lavender-blue ( with intense golden-orange center ) flowers, up to 2.5 inches wide, during late spring into early summer.

'Wartburg Star'
Fast growing and stoloniferous, reaching up to 3 x 5 feet. The violet-blue flowers, up to 3 inches across, are borne in late spring to early summer.

Aster turbinellus ( Prairie Aster )
An attractive bushy perennial, reaching a maximum size of 5 x 5.8 ( rarely over 4 ) feet, that is native to open woods in central U.S. ( from Nebraska to Illinois; south to Kansas to Louisiana ).
The smooth-edged, lance-shaped to narrow ovate basal leaves, up to 8 x 0.7 ( rarely over 5 ) inches, are deep green.
The abundant, large, lavender-pink to violet ( with yellow center ) flowers, up to 1.5 inch across, are borne on open heads during early to mid autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on dry, light or stony, well drained soil. It is highly rust and mildew resistant.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photos


Aster umbellatus ( Flat Topped Aster )
Also called Doellingeria umbellata. A fast growing to invasive perennial, reaching a maximum size of 8 x 4.5 ( rarely over 6 ) feet, that is native to moist meadows and forests in eastern North America ( from southern Alberta to Saskatchewan to Manitoba to Thunder Bay, Ontario to Moosonee, Ontario to Newfoundland; south to central Nebraska to northwest Missouri to central Kentucky to northern Georgia to central Virginia ). It was abundant at Detroit, Michigan and sporadic on the Ohio shore during the 1800s but has declined considerably there since. It is endangered in South Dakota, Nebraska and Missouri. It is an important host plant for Harris Checkerspot butterfly
The smooth-edged, lance-shape to elliptical leaves, up to 6.5 x 1.5 inches in size, are deep green.
The creamy-white flowers, up to 1 inch across, are borne on dense, large flat-topped clusters, up to 12 inches, over a period lasting up to 8 weeks during late summer into mid-autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on moist to wet soil ( it is not drought tolerant, water deeply once weekly during summer if rainfall is not sufficient ). Almost never bothered by pests of disease.
Plants can be pinched heavily during early summer for a more compact habit, 1/2 the regular height. Propagation is from division or seed.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photo


Aster undulatum ( Wavyleaf Aster )
Also called Symphyotrichum undulatum. A perennial, native to dry open woods in eastern North America ( from Arkansas to southern Illinois to far southern Ontario to central New York State to southern Maine; south to Louisiana to Florida...it is also native to Nova Scotia ). It is endangered in Indiana, Illinois and Nova Scotia.
The lavender-blue flowers are borne late summer into early autumn.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in partial shade on sandy or gravelly, well drained soil. It is very drought tolerant.

* photo taken on Sep 25 2016 near Reisterstown, MD


Aster vimineus ( Small White Aster )
Considered by some to be a subspecies of A. puniceus. Forms a tall upright bushy perennial, reaching a maximum height of 5 ( rarely over 3 ) feet. It makes an excellent border plant. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was locally common around Windsor and the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It also occurred around Niagara Falls during that time.
The leaves are up to 4.3 x 0.3 inches in size.
The small white flowers, up to 0.3 inches across, are borne late summer to mid autumn.
The stems are purplish.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in partial shade on moist soil. It is rarely bothered by pests or disease.

* photo taken by Robert H. Mohlenbrock @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


'Lovely'
Similar but only reaching up to 4 x 2.5 feet with mildew free foliage and profuse starry small lilac pink flowers in September and October.

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