Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Eucalyptus

A MASSIVE genus of approximately 700 species of trees and shrubs almost entirely native to Australia. They are THE MOST IMPORTANT forest trees of Australia however are useful and frequently planted in many places throughout the world. I fell in love with the Eucalyptus after seeing a row of MASSIVE Eucalyptus globulus over 200 feet in height planted along a stream within view of the Pacific Ocean north of Vina del Mar, Chile which as a city was in generally a "Mediterranean horticultural paridise". As large as these trees were, they are tiny to some that grow in old growth forests in Tasmania and some other parts of Australia. In fact Eucalyptus regnans IS the worlds largest hardwood tree.
Caution should be used in some areas. Eucalyptus are generally evergreen, however this does not mean the leaves stay on forever, this means they fall only gradually so the tree always produces enough foliage to replace leaves that fall so that it is never bare. Tons of litter collect under Eucalyptus. In parks the lawn mower usually takes care of it. In woodlands, controlled burns may be a means of control to prevent it from accumulating to the point of being a fire hazard. In wet climates this is not a problem, however care should be used in places such as southern California where many Eucalyptus grow especially well but are not always welcome in fire prone areas.
The Eucalyptus are extremely valuable for shade, wind control, fuel production, timber and the flowers are among the worlds best for the production of honey.
Eucalyptus do not like root disturbance but grow extremely fast...PLANT THEM SMALL ( under 18 inches in height ) if you want success! Also avoid planting pot bound plants or plants with circling roots which are almost certain to not establish.
Most prefer full sun and acidic, light, fertile, well drained soil. Conditions vary and I tried to include that in my species entries below.
Eucalyptus are generally pest and disease free, however in some places such as California Eucalyptus Longhorn Beetle may be a problem. Pruning is not typically needed, however most Eucalyptus can be cut back hard if needed. Young trees of taller forms should be pruned to a single leader and feathered by spacing and shortening over extended side branches. Pruning is best done during winter.
Propagation from sowing the seed is easily done and fast. Soaking seed for 24 hours beforehand may speed up germination.
Some Eucalyptus have been moved in to a new genus called Corymbia; I plan to add this at a later date.

* massive photo shoot on Mediterranean climate plants including the Eucalyptus will be conducted in Santiago, Chile during December 2012









* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo taken by I.T. Haig @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* excellent video found on internet





Eucalyptus acaciformis ( Wattle Leaved Eucalyptus )
A fast growing, dense, medium size tree that is similar to Eucalyptus nicholii.
Some records include: largest on record - 82 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet. It is valuable as a windbreak tree.
The fine, lance-shaped leaves, up to 4 x 0.5 inches, are bluish in color.
The flowers are white.
Hardy zones 8b to 10 tolerating as low as 16 F. Frost and snow tolerant. Thrives in southern England.

Eucalyptus acmenoides ( White Mahogany )
A straight trunked, spreading, rounded huge tree native to much of eastern Australia.
Some records include: largest on record - 200 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet.
The thin, lance-shaped leaves, up to 7 x 1.5 inches, are glossy deep green.
The small white flowers are borne in clusters during spring and early summer.
The gray-brown bark is finely fibrous.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 requiring 20 to 60 inches of average yearly rainfall.

Eucalyptus agglomerata ( Blue-leaved Stringybark )
A large tree that is native to southeast Australia.
Some records include: 6.5 years - 52 feet; 26 years - 110 feet; largest on record - 135 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet.
The narrow lance-shaped leaves are up to 5 inches in length.
Hardy zones 8b to 9 ( tolerating as low as 10 F ).
It prefers consistant moisture and is not well adapted to Mediterranean climates.

Eucalyptus aggregata ( Black Gum )
A straight trunked, dense, broad-crowned tree native to cooler parts of southeastern Australia.
Some records include: 18 years - 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot; largest on record - 90 x 57 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.5 feet.
The narrow lance-shaped leaves, up to 5 x 1 inches, are glossy bright green.
The small white flowers are borne in clusters during summer.
The bark is dark gray and rough.
Hardy zones 7b to 9 tolerating as low as -3 F requires very high rainfall in excess of 40 inches per year. It thrives and is very vigorous in England. Flood tolerant.

Eucalyptus alba ( Poplar Gum )
A striking large tree native to the Northern Territory in Australia.
Also called White Gum. Some records include: largest on record - 150 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 6.5 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 10 x 2.5 inches, are dull green. This is one of the very few deciduous Eucalyptus.
The small creamy-white flowers are borne in small clusters during late winter and early spring.
The very attractive bark is smooth and white.
Hardy zones 10 to 12 requiring 40+ inches of average yearly rainfall.
Prefers tropical climates and tolerates seasonal flooding.

Eucalyptus albens ( White Box )
A fast growing, dense, strongly branched, erect tree that is a widespread native to eastern Australia.
Some records include: largest on record - 82 x 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.5 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 7 x 1 inches, are bluish-gray.
The creamy-white flowers are borne in showy clusters during autumn into winter.
The nectar rich flowers are valuable for honey production.
The bark is fibrous light gray.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 tolerating as low as 10 F requiring 30 to 80 inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers hot summers.

Eucalyptus amygdalis ( Black Peppermint )
A dense very large tree with pendulous branches that is native to Tasmania.
Some records include: 17 years - 47 feet with a trunk diameter of 21 inches; largest on record - 475 x 80 feet with a trunk diameter of 18 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves are up to 5 inches in length.
The flowers are white.
The bark is gray-brown and fibrous.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 tolerating as low as 6 F.

Eucalyptus andrewsii
A very large tree that is closely related to Eucalyptus consideniana
Some records include: 22 years - 90 feet; largest on record - 150 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves are up to 7 inches in length.
The flowers are creamy-white.
Hardy zones 8b to 10 ( tolerating as low as 10 F ).

Eucalyptus angophoroides ( Apple Top Box )
An endangered large tree that is closely related to Eucalyptus bridgesiana. Some records include: largest on record - 135 feet with a diameter of 3.5 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves are up to 10 x 2 inches.
Hardy zones 8b to 9 ( tolerating as low as 10 F ). It is both tolerant of drought and poorly drained soil.

Eucalyptus angustissima ( Narrow-Leafed Mallee )
A moderate growing, dense, mult-stemmed mallee shrub reaching a maximum height of 26 x 21 feet.
The very narrow, lance-shaped leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are bright green.
The profuse, small white flowers are borne over a long season from winter into mid summer. The bark is light gray.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 requiring 12+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers warm climates with low summer humidity.

Eucalyptus approximans ( Barren Mountain Mallee )
A small tree that is native to the central part of the east coast of Australia.
Some records include: largest on record - 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 13 inches.
The foliage is glossy green.
The light gray bark is smooth.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 ( tolerating as low as 4 F ) on very well drained soil. Thrives in mild parts of England.

Eucalyptus archeri ( Alpine Cidar Gum )
Also called Eucalyptus gunnii spp archeri. It is an attractive, medium-sized tree that is native to Tasmania. Some records include: 21 years - 66 feet with a trunk diameter of 22 inches; 28 years - trunk diameter of 28 inches.
Hardy zones 7b to 9 ( tolerating as low as -3 F ). Thrives in milder parts of England, it does not tolerate the hot humid summers of the southern U.S.

Eucalyptus argophloia
Some records include: largest on record - 130 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet.
The narrow lance-shaped leaves are up to 6 x 1 inches.
The bark is white and peeling.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 requiring 24 to 28 inches of average yearly rainfall. It thrives with an average temperature around 41 F for the coldest month of the year.
Tolerant of summer heat and clay soil.

Eucalyptus badiensis ( Badja Gum )
A very fast growing, very large tree. Some records include: 5 years - 23 feet; largest on record - 150 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
The narrow lance-shaped leaves are up to 8 x 0.5 inches.
The flowers are white.
The bark is smooth and brown.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 tolerating as low as 10 F.

Eucalyptus baileyana ( Bailey's Stringybark )
A large tree native to northeast New South Wales and southeastern Queensland, Australia.
Some records include: 23 years - 80 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet; largest on record - 133 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 6 x 1 inches, are deep green.
The flower clusters contain around 7 creamy-white flowers.
They are followed by fruit capsules, up to 0.5 inches across.
The bark is fibrous. The hard timber is used to construction and fence posts.
Hardy zones 10 to 11

Eucalyptus baueriana ( Blue Box )
An erect trunked, very dense, medium-size tree native to forests of coastal areas of southeastern Australia. Some records include: 28 years - 75 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot; largest on record - 75 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.3 feet.
The oval to rounded leaves, up to 4 x 2 inches, are bright green.
The small white flowers are borne late summer into fall.
The fibrous bark is gray or red, with white patches.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 tolerating as low as 4 F with no damage at 7 F.

Eucalyptus baxteri ( Brown Stringybark )
Some records include: largest on record - 133 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.5 feet.
The thick, lance-shaped leaves, up to 7 x 2 inches, are glossy green.
The flowers are white.
The timber is very strong.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 requiring 18+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Thrives in just about any well drained soil with a PH from 4 to 6.5.

Eucalyptus bicostata ( Eurabbie )
A very fast growing, large tree native to high mountains in southeastern Australia. It is considered by some to be a subspecies of Eucalyptus globulus. Some records include: largest on record - 150 x 120 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 feet.
The "juvenile" leaves on young trees is heart-shaped and silvery-blue.
The sickle-shaped, "adult leaves", up to 15 x 2 inches, are glossy deep green.
The creamy-white flowers are borne in small clusters of 3 during spring into summer.
The attractive smooth bark is white to bluish-gray and shed in long narrow strips.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 tolerating as low as 10 F requiring inches of average yearly rainfall. Thrives especially well in Ireland. Drought tolerant.

Eucalyptus blakeyi ( Blakely's Red Gum )
A straight trunked, handsome, ornamental large tree loved by koalas, that is native to eastern Australia.
Some records include: largest on record - 100 x 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
The broad "juvenile" leaves on young trees are broad and gray-green.
The hanging, thick, narrow, sickle-shaped leaves on older trees are up to 7 x 1.5 inches, blue-green above, blue-gray beneath.
The showy white to pink flowers are borne in clusters late winter and spring.
The flowers are important for honey production.
The beautiful smooth bark is mottled cream and peels in large flakes.
This tree is highly valued for its timber.
Hardy zones 8 to 11. Prefers hot summers, it thrives in the Texas and the southwest in the United States.

Eucalyptus bosistoana ( Coast Grey Box )
A very large tree, that is native to southeastern Australia. Little known outside its native range, it likely survives only in the very mildest parts of England such as Cornwall where a 23 foot tree grows.
Some records include: largest on record - 200 x 112 feet with a trunk diameter of 7.5 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 8 x 0.7 inches in size, are dull green.
The bark is light gray and smooth on young trees, turning flaky on older trees.
The durable, termite-resistant timber is highly valued.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 in warm temperate climates with 28 to 48 inches of annual precip.
It is lime tolerant and can tolerate up to 40 frost days per year.

Eucalyptus botryoides ( Bangalay )
An extremely fast growing, straight trunked, large crowned, medium size tree native to coastal eastern Australia. Some records include: 3 years - 16 feet; 5 years - 20+ feet; 47 years - 92 feet with a trunk diameter of 20 inches; largest on record - 170 x 82 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet.
The broad, lance-shaped leaves, up to 7 x 2.5 inches, are glossy deep green.
The profuse white flowers are borne in large clusters during summer.
The flowers are valuable for honey production.
The reddish to brown bark is thick and fibrous on the lower trunk; smooth and white on the upper branches and on young trees. The timber is very valuable.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 20 F requiring 25+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Tolerant of coastal exposure, drought and flooding.

Eucalyptus bridgesiana ( Apple Box )
A fast growing, long lived, pendulous, spreading, sturdy, handsome, massively large tree native to southeastern Australia.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 6 feet; 32 years - 90 feet with a trunk diameter of 13 inches; 90 years - 133 feet with a trunk diameter of 52 inches; 300 years - trunk diameter of 6.6 feet; largest on record - 133 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 8 feet. Very long-lived, it can exceed 400 years in age.
One double trunked tree with a 12 foot diameter is likely not a record as it is considered to be 2 trees that have grown together.
The tapered, lance-shaped leaves, up to 10 x 1 inches, are glossy green.
The profuse white flowers borne summer and fall, are very valuable for honey production. This tree is adored by Sugar Gliders.
The bark is fibrous.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 tolerating as low as 9 F requiring 8+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Enjoys cold winters and hot summers. Thrives especially well in mild parts of England. Tolerant of clay soils.

Eucalyptus brookeriana ( Brooker's Gum )
An extremely fast growing, erect, straight trunked, tall tree native to forests of Tasmania and nearby parts of southeastern Australia. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 6+ feet; 21 years - 72 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet; largest on record - 135 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.5 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 7 x 2.5 inches, are lush, mid green.
The profuse creamy-white flowers are borne summer and fall.
The higher branches have smooth creamy-gray bark and the lower trunk has fibrous, gray-brown bark.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 tolerating as low as 10 F requiring 34+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Enjoys cool summers, even thriving in Ireland. Flood tolerant.

Eucalyptus burgessiana ( Faulconbridge Mallee Ash )
A large multi-stemmed shrub, that is native to the Blue Mountains in New South Wales where it is very rare. Some records include: largest on record - 20 feet.
The thick leaves are deep green.
The bark is smooth and gray though it may sometimes have orange patches.
Hardy zones 8b to 9 ( tolerating as low as 10 F ).

Eucalyptus cadens ( Tumbledown Swamp Gum )
A very rare small tree that is native to the Warby Mountain Range in Victoria region in southeastern Australia.
The very attractive foliage is blue at first, later turning to green.
Hardy zones 7b to 9 ( tolerating as low as 0 F ).

Eucalyptus caesia ( Gungurru )
An moderate growing, ornamental mallee or slender, open, weeping small tree to 20 x 27 feet, native to southern Western Australia.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; largest on record - 50 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 5 x 1 inches, are green.
The pink or red flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne in hanging clusters.
The stems are powdery white.
The smooth red-brown bark sheds in long, curled strips to reveal green fresh bark beneath.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 19 F requiring 15+ inches of average yearly rainfall.

'Magna'
Basically the Gungurru on steroids. It grows larger and sturdier, to 50 x 30 feet, and has larger leaves, to 10 x 2 inches. The profuse red flowers are followed by waxy white fruits.

Eucalyptus caleyi ( Caley's Ironbark )
A medium size tree reaching a maximum height of 90 feet that is native to eastern Australia. Some records include: 22 years - 45 feet.
The oval, "adult' leaves, up to 5 x 2 inches, are gray-green.
The profuse, creamy-white to pink flowers, up to 0.7 inches across, are borne autumn through spring. The flowers are valuable for honey production.
The gray-black bark is deeply furrowed and hard.
Hardy zones to tolerating as low as F requiring inches of average yearly rainfall.

Eucalyptus caliginosa ( Broad-Leafed Stringybark )
A high but spreading crowned, massive, stately tall tree reaching a maximum height of 100 feet that is native to the New England Tableland in New South Wales as well as nearby parts of Queensland in Australia.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 6 x 1.3 inches, are glossy green.
The dark gray bark is thick, furrowed,fissured and fibery.
The profuse small white flowers are borne during autumn.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 tolerating as low as 5 F. Trees may take a few years to acquire winter hardiness.

Eucalyptus calycogona ( Gooseberry Mallee )
A mallee shrub to dense, spreading small tree that is a widespread native to semi-arid parts of southern Australia. Some records include: largest on record - 30 x 30 feet.
The narrow, lance-shaped leaves, up to 4 x 1 inches, are glossy bright green.
The smooth dark gray bark shreds off in long strips to reveal bright gray fresh bark beneath.
The creamy-white or rarely pink flowers are borne in clusters during winter and spring.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 requiring sandy soil and 10+ inches of average yearly rainfall.

Eucalyptus camaldulensis ( Murray River Gum )
Also called River Red Gum. A pendulous, massive, stately tree native along watercoarses over most of inland Australia. An outstanding ornamental shade tree, it is also very valuable for its timber, soil stabilization and reforestation around the world.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 16 feet; 10 years - 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot; 20 years - 105 x 33 feet; largest on record - 220 x 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 13 feet; longest lived - 800 years.
The hanging, aromatic, lance-shaped leaves, up to 12 x 2.5 inches, are rich green.
The profuse white floweres are borne during summer and are valuable for honey production.
The smooth gray bark is attractively mottled.
Hardy zones 8 to 12 tolerating as low as 10 F requiring 8+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Flood and salt tolerant.

'Pendula'
Longer drooping leaves, up to 12 inches in length.

* photo taken by Walter Gill @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Eucalyptus campeste ( Silvertop Gimlet )
A low branching, dense, rounded small tree native to semi-arid parts of Western Australia.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; largest on record - 40 x 27 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 5 x 1 inches, are gray-green.
The showy yellow flowers are borne spring and summer.
Silvery-gray frosted seed capsules follow.
The copper colored bark is smooth.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 18 F requiring 10+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Requires very well drained soil, is very drought tolerant as well as tolerant of salt, clay and alkaline soils.

Eucalyptus camphora ( Broadleaf Sally )
A very fast growing, highly ornamental tree that is native to southeastern Australia.
Some records include: 9 years - 41 feet with a trunk diameter of 0.6 feet; 20 years - 82 x 27 feet; largest on record - 100 x 50 feet. largest in England - 60 feet.
The leaves, up to 5 x 2 inches, are luxuriant deep green.
The creamy-white flowers appear during autumn.
The bark is smooth and gray.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 tolerating as low as 0 F. Can be grown as a foliage perennial as far north as zone 6. This Eucalyptus can be attempted in the southeastern U.S.
Tolerant of drought, clay, wet soil and shade.

Eucalyptus chapmannii ( Bogong Gum )
An extremely fast growing large tree, that is native in the area near Mount Bogong in Victoria region of Australia. Some records include: 22 years - 80 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet.
The leaves are very large and tapered.
The bark is smooth and white to gray on younger stems, turning rough and darker towards the bases of older trees.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 ( tolerating as low as 4 F ).

Eucalyptus cinerea ( Argyle Apple )
An attractive short trunked, dense, spreading tree native to southeastern Australia.
Also called Silver Dollar Tree. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 8 feet; 4 years - 20 feet; 20 years - 66 x 30 feet; largest on record - 80 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.5 feet. Trees have exceeded 60 feet in Ireland.
An excellent windbreak and screen, typically retaining its lower branches unless pruned off.
The aromatic juvenile foliage is round and silvery-gray. The aromatic, leathery "adult" foliage, is lance-shaped, up to 6 inches in length, and gray-green.
The small white flowers are borne during early summer.
The bark is fibrous, red-brown.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 tolerating as low as 8 F requiring 24+ inches of average yearly rainfall. It tolerates the hot humid summers of the southeast U.S. very well. It can also be grown as a foliage perennial in zone 7.

Eucalyptus cladocalyx ( Sugar Gum )
A dense, broad canopied, large tree native to South Australia.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 9 feet; 30 years - 102 feet; largest on record - 170 x 80 feet with a trunk diameter of 6.6 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 7 x 1.5 inches, are glossy deep green.
The abundant, creamy-yellow flowers are borne during summer.
The smooth bark is pale gray and mottled.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 tolerating as low as F requiring 12+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Enjoys hot summers, is clay and alkaline soil tolerant.

'Nana'
A bushy, "dwarf" form only reaching a maximum size of 33 x 33 feet.

Eucalyptus cloeziana ( Gympie Messmate )
A tall straight trunked tree native to eastern Queensland.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 12 feet; 17 years - 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.3 feet; largest on record - 190 x 66 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 feet. A valuable shade and timber tree.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 6 x 1.5 inches, are deep green turning purplish during winter.
The profuse white flowers are borne during autumn.
The bark is dark brown and flaky.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 19 F requiring 20 to 100 inches of average yearly rainfall.

Eucalyptus cneorifolia ( Kangaroo Island Mallee )
A fast growing, moderately long-lived small tree that is only native to Kangaroo Island in Australia. Some records include: largest on record - 40 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 5.2 feet ( rarely even reaches half that and is usually multi-trunked ).
The attractive foliage ranges from elliptical on young trees to lance-shaped on older trees.
The flowers are small and white.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 in full sun on acidic or alkaline sandy soil. It is tolerant of drought and coastal conditions.

Eucalyptus coccifera ( Tasmanian Snow Gum )
A vigorous, fast growing, broad spreading, large tree native to the mountains of Tasmania.
Some records include: 5 years - 17 feet; 20 years - 60 x 30 feet; 33 years - 90 feet; 123 years - 86 x 90 feet with a trunk diameter of 6.6 feet; largest on record - 130 x 90 feet with a trunk diameter of 6.8 feet.
The aromatic juvenile leaves, up to 2 x 1.3 inches, found on young trees is rounded and blue-green. They are followed on older trees by thick, lance-shaped, peppermint-scented adult leaves, up to 5 x 1.5 inches, that are gray-green in color.
The creamy-white flowers are borne in axilliary clusters of 3 to 7 during early summer.
The white and gray bark peels in long strips to reveal creamy-white bark beneath.
Hardy zones 6b to 9 tolerating as low as -10 F requiring 50 to 100 inches of average yearly rainfall. Very cold tolerant, even tolerating a yearly average temperature below 45 F and up to 150 frost days per year; thrives in England and possibly even the eastern U.S.

Eucalyptus conferruminata ( Bushy Yate )
A moderate growing, very dense, short single trunked small tree reaching a maximum size of 30 x 21 feet that is native to Western Australia.
The leaves are up to 3 x 1 inches.
The yellow-green flowers are borne in flowerheads, up to 5 inches across, during spring and summer. Large, spiky capsules, up to 3 inches across follow.
The smooth light gray bark flakes off in stripes and can also be rough near the base.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 requiring 20+ inches of average yearly rainfall.

Eucalyptus consideniana
A fast growing, medium-sized to large tree, reaching up to 100 feet or more, that is native to southeastern Australia.
The very long leaves, up to 7 inches in length, are gray-green.
The very rough bark is brownish-gray.
Hardy zones 8b to 9 ( tolerating as low as 12 F ), it is known to thrive in Cornwall, England. Flood tolerant.

Eucalyptus coolabah ( Coolabah )
A spreading crowned, medium size tree native to dry inland parts of Australia.
Some records include: largest on record - 100 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.5 feet.
The narrow, lance-shaped leaves, up to 8 inches in length, are gray-green.
The creamy-white flowers are borne in large clusters during summer.
The bark on young trees and upper branches is whitish-gray and smooth, becoming rough and orange on older trees.
Hardy zones 9 to 12 tolerating as low as 20 F requiring 8 to 40 inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers a Mediterranean or desert type climate and is tolerant of extreme heat, drought and flooding.

Eucalyptus cordata ( Silver Gum )
A fast growing, dense, straight-trunked, broadly columnar, medium size tree native to Tasmania. Some records include: first year - 3.3 feet; 5 years - 23 feet; 20 years - 60 feet; 32 years - 110 feet with a trunk diameter of 26 inches ( England ); largest on record - 120 x 66 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet.
The attractive ( always juvenile ) heart-shaped leaves, up to 5 x 3 inches, are silvery-gray. The cut foliage is often used for floral arrangements.
The profuse creamy-white flowers are borne during spring.
The attractive smooth white bark is mottled with gray and green patches.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 tolerating as low as 8 F. Grows well on just about any well drained soil and is tolerant of marshy soil, coastal conditions and even summer frosts.

Eucalyptus cornuta ( Yate )
A medium size tree native to Western Australia.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 5 feet; 32 years - 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot; 130 years - trunk diameter of 6 feet; largest on record - 120 x 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 6 x 1.5 inches, are glossy deep green.
The yellow flowers are borne in large clusters during spring.
The bark on young trees and upper branches is smooth, whitish-gray, becoming dark brown and rough on older trees. It is one of the worlds strongest timbers.
Hardy zones 7 to 10 tolerating as low as F requiring 19 to 60 inches of average yearly rainfall. Preferring Mediterranean climates, it is tolerant of flooding, drought, most soil types and coastal conditions.

Eucalyptus cosmophylla ( Cup Gum )
A tall mallee to crooked trunked, dense, spreading small tree reaching a maximum height of 50 feet that is native to South Australia.
The leaves, up to 6 x 1.3 inches, are gray-green.
The showy, creamy-white flowers, up to 1.3 inches across, are borne late summer through the following spring.
The smooth gray-white bark flakes off.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 12 F. Flood tolerant.

Eucalyptus costata ( Ridge-Fruited Mallee )
An attractive, broad crowned, large mallee shrub reacing a maximum height of 20 feet that is native to semi-arid parts of southeastern Australia.
The thick leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are glossy green.
The creamy-white flowers are borne in large clusters during spring.
The smooth, gray-brown bark flakes off in ribbons.
Some records include: largest on record - feet with a trunk diameter of feet.
Hardy zones 9 to 11

Eucalyptus crebra ( Narrow-Leafed Ironbark )
A straight trunked tall tree native to forests of eastern Australia. Some records include: 13 years - 57 feet with a trunk diameter of 8 inches; largest on record - 120 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet. It makes an excellent street tree.
The narrow lance-shaped leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are gray-green.
The small white flowers are borne spring into summer.
The flowers are valuable for honey production.
The dark gray bark is deeply furrowed.
The timber is durable and strong, valuable for construction.
Hardy zones 9 to 12 tolerating as low as 10 F requiring 22 to 60 inches of average yearly rainfall. Tolerant of clay soil.

Eucalyptus crenulata ( Buxton Gum )
Also called Silver Gum. A very attractive, fast growing, dense, rounded, small tree native to swampy areas of Victoria, Australia where it is endangered. On ideal sites with proper pruning, it can grow into a well branched shade tree. Some records include: 6 years - 27 feet with a trunk diameter of 8 inches; largest on record - 50 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of feet.
The opposite, shallow-toothed, heart shaped leaves, up to 3 x 2 inches, are gray-blue at first, later turning gray-green.
The profuse white flowers are borne during spring.
The bark is smooth.
Hardy zones 7b to 10 tolerating as low as 1 F requiring 45 to 60 inches of average yearly rainfall, especially thriving in England. It likes consistant moisture and is not suitable for Mediterranean climates. It likes cold climates and tolerates frequent frosts and flooding. It can be cut back hard each year and can even be grown as a foliage perennial.

Eucalyptus crucis ( Silver Mallee )
A moderate growing, mallee to small straggly tree, reaching up to 27 x 33 feet, is native to Western Australia. Some records include: largest on record - 50 feet.
The stalkless, opposite rounded leaves, up to 2 x 1.7 inches, are glaucous powdery gray.
Profuse showy white flowers are borne in clusters from late spring to autumn.
The stems are powdery gray.
The red bark sheds in curled strips.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 requiring 11+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers a Mediterranean climate.

Eucalyptus cunninghamii ( Cliff Mallee Ash )
Also called Eucalyptus rupicola. A rapid growing, multiple-stemmed large shrub tree native to a small area in the Blue Mountains, west of Sydney, Australia.
Some records include: 15 years - 10 x 17 feet.
The narrow lance-shaped leaves, up to 4.5 inches in length, are glossy green.
The profuse creamy-white flowers are borne in clusters during autumn.
The gray bark is smooth except for the ribbons the shred off.
Hardy zones 8 to 11, tolerating hard pruning.

Eucalyptus curtisii ( Plunkett Mallee )
An endangered, moderate growing, very ornamental, slender stemmed mallee tree reaching a maximum size of 40 x 17 feet. It makes an excellent landscape tree.
The leaves, up to 6 x 1 inches, are glossy silvery-gray.
The profuse white flowers are borne in large terminal panicles during winter and spring.
Hardy zones 9 to 12 requiring 42+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers hot wet climates.

Eucalyptus cypellocarpa ( Mountain Gray Gum )
Also called Yellow Gum )
A fast growing, straight trunked, very tall tree native to mountainous parts of southeastern Australia. Some records include: largest on record - 220 x 115 feet with a trunk diameter of 16 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 24 x 2 inches, are glossy deep green.
The creamy-white flowers are produced profusely during summer.
The creamy-white mottled trunk sheds off bark in long ribbons.
The timber is light brown and is highly valuable for poles, construction, flooring, pulp and fencing.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 requiring 28 to 52 inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers cool winters.

Eucalyptus dalrympleana ( Broad-Leaved Kindling Bark )
A very fast growing, broadly columnar, very large tree native to cold mountainous areas ( 900 to 1600 meters ) in southeastern Australia and Tasmania.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 13 feet; 5 years - 50 feet; 20 years - 100 x 33 feet; 32 years - 120 feet ( England ); largest on record - 233 x 150 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 feet.
The aromatic "juvenile" leaves in young plants is unstalked and rounded.
The curved, taper pointed "adult" leaves on older plants, up to 10.5 x 2 inches, are bronze at first turning to deep blue-green on both sides.
The white flowers are borne in axilliary clusters of 3 during late summer.
The bark is smooth and white to deep pink on young trees and upper limbs. On older trees the bark becomes gray-brown peeling off in large flakes to reveal freshly exposed creamy-white bark.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 tolerating as low as 3 F requiring 30 to 60 inches of average yearly rainfall, tolerating up to 109 frost days per year. It prefers cool rainy climates, such as Ireland. Snow and lime tolerant.

Eucalyptus dealbata ( Tumbledown Red Gum )
A fast growing, medium-sized tree that is native to New South Wales in Australia.
Some records include: 14 years - 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot; largest on record - 66 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of feet.
The leaves, up to 5 inches in length, are grayish-green.
The flowers are white.
The bark is red and white.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 tolerating as low as 10 F requiring inches of average yearly rainfall. Heat and drought tolerant, it thrives in the southwest and Texas.

Eucalyptus deanei ( Round-Leafed Blue Gum )
A very fast growing, beautiful, straight trunked, very large tree native to moist forests of southeastern Australia.
Some records include: 11 years - 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 inches; 18 years - 80 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet; largest on record - 220 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 feet; largest in California - 100 + feet.
The broad, lance-shaped leaves, up to 7 x 1.5 inches, are glossy deep green above, light green beneath.
The white flowers are borne in clusters during winter.
The creamy-white bark peels off in short ribbons.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 tolerating as low as 7 F requiring inches of average yearly rainfall. Thrives in milder parts of England.

Eucalyptus deglupta ( Mindanao Gum )
A gigantic tree which is one of the worlds fastest growing, is native to tropical mountain forests of the Phillipines, New Guinea and parts of Indonesia.
Some records include: 1.5 years - 33 feet; 7 years - 100 feet; 10 years - 110 feet with a trunk diameter of 14 inches; 15 years - 190 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet; largest on record - 250 x 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 8 feet.
The opposite-arranged, broad lance-shaped leaves, up to 9 x 2 inches, are medium green.
The profuse masses of tiny white flowers are borne in large showy panicles, up to 8 x 7 inches, at the tips of the branches.
The smooth orangish-brown bark peels to reveal bright green, orange and purplish-brown fresh bark beneath.
Hardy zones 9 to 12 tolerating as low as 17 F requiring 80+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Thrives in hot rainy climates and prefers a soil PH from 6 to 7.5. Very salt tolerant.

* photos taken on Jan 3 2011 @ Deerfield Beach Arboretum, Florida







* video found on internet


Eucalyptus delegatensis ( Alpine Ash )
A straight, open crowned, very tall tree native to forests in mountainous regions of southeastern Australia. Some records include: 5 years - 17 feet; 16 years - 60 feet; 28 years - 72 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet; 200 years - 208 x 97 feet with trunk diameter of 8 feet; largest on record - 300 x 140 feet with a trunk diameter of 13 feet; largest in England - 125 feet; largest in Washington State - 70 feet in Seattle. A massive Oak-like specimen in Christchurch, New Zealand is 133 x 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 11 feet. Extremely long-lived, this forest giant can persist up to 500 years.
The blue-green "juvenile" foliage on young trees is broader and shorter than the adult foliage found on mature trees that is long, curved and up to 14 x 2 inches.
The small white flowers are borne in late summer.
The upper trunk and limbs has very attractive smooth, creamy-white to bright bluish-gray bark that sheds off in long ribbons. The lower trunk has fibrous bark that is brown. The timber is of excellent quality.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 tolerating as low as 2 F requiring 28 to 90 inches of average yearly rainfall. It requires cool summers with an average temperature of the hottest month below 70 F and can tolerate as many as 100 frost days per year, or 1 to 6 months of snow on the ground.

Eucalyptus dendromorpha ( Budawang Ash )
A fast growing, large tree reaching a maximum height of 100 feet that is native to the Blue Mountains of Australia.
The leaves are up to 4.5 x 1 inches. The flowers are white.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 ( tolerating 5 F ) requiring high rainfall.

Eucalyptus denticulata
A rare, very large tree that is native to extreme southeastern Australia not including Tasmania. Some records include: largest on record - 213 x 117 feet with a trunk diameter of 18 feet. It is closely related to and is very similar to Eucalyptus nitens. Very long-lived, it can persist up to 400 years.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 ( tolerating as low as 7 F ).
It is little known but has grown very well in Ireland.

Eucalyptus desmondensis ( Desmond Mallee )
A multi-stemmed, slender, pendulous branched, mallee shrub reaching a maximum height of 15 feet that is native to a very small area close to Ravensthorpe in the southern part of Western Australia.
The thick leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are gray-green.
The light yellow flowers in late summer open from red-brown buds.
The branchlets are silvery and the bark is smooth and powdery white.
Hardy zones 9 to 11

Eucalyptus diversicolor ( Karri Gum )
A very straight trunked, open crowned, massive tree native to the moist, far southwest of Western Australia.
It is the largest tree in Western Australia where it is valued for its high quality timber. Some records include: 16 years - 120 feet with a trunk diameter of 15 inches; largest on record - 330 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 13 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 6 x 1 inches, are deep green above, bright green beneath.
The creamy-white flowers are borne spring and summer, they are of high value for honey production.
The smooth, whitish-gray bark sheds in a very attractive pattern.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 tolerating as low as 20 F requiring 36+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers sandy, well drained soil with a PH of 4 to 7. Tolerant of clay.

Eucalyptus dives ( Broad-Leafed Peppermint )
A open, spreading, very large tree native to southeastern Australia.
Some records include: 24 years - 75 feet; largest on record - 100 x 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet.
The ovate leaves, up to 6 x 1.5 inches, are glossy deep blue-green. They are highly aromatic fragrant when crushed.
The profuse white flowers are borne during spring.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 tolerating as low as 7 F. Prefers cold winters and cool summers.
Drought tolerant.

Eucalyptus dunni ( Dunn's White Gum )
A beautiful, very fast growing, spreading crowned large tree, that is native to southeastern Queensland in Australia. Some records include: largest on record - 180 x 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 8 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves are up to 12 x 2 inches.
The bark is smooth and white.
Hardy zones 8b to 9 ( tolerating as low as 9 F ).

Eucalyptus dura ( Hard Ironbark )
A medium size tree reaching a maximum height of 80 feet that is closely related and very similar to Eucalyptus paniculata but is shorter growing with thicker, glossier leaves. It is native to the inland part of southeast Queensland, Australia.
The hard, corky bark is dark gray with interlacing wide furrows.
Hardy zones 9 to 11

Eucalyptus dwyeri ( Dwyer's Red Gum )
A mallee shrub or small tree reaching a maximum height of 50 feet that is native to semi-arid parts of southeastern Australia.
The narrow, lance-shaped leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are dull dark green.
The attractive red buds open up into large, creamy-white flowers during winter and spring. The flowers are valuable in the production of honey.
The smooth creamy bark flakes off in small flakes.
Hardy zones 9 to 11

Eucalyptus elata ( River Peppermint )
A fast growing, slender, erect, tall tree native to southeastern Australia.
Some records include: largest on record - 203 x 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 8.3 feet. The River Peppermint is a long-lived tree that can persist up to 300 years or more.
The somewhat pendulous, lance-shaped leaves, up to 7 inches in length are deep green above. They have a peppermint fragrance when crushed.
The abundant but very small creamy-white flowers are borne in large clusters during spring.
The upper branches and young trees have white to yellowish bark that sheds in long ribbons. The bark on the lower branches is dark and hardened.
Hardy zones 8b to 11 tolerating as low as 8 F requiring 28 to 46 inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers cool winters.

Eucalyptus eremophila
A moderate growing small tree reaching a maximum height of 25 feet. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 tolerating as low as 17 F. Salt tolerant.

Eucalyptus erythrocorys ( Red-Cap Gum )
Also calleed Illyarrie. A fast growing, open, spreading small tree reaching a maximum size of 33 x 30 feet that is native to Western Australia.
The leathery, lance-shaped leaves, up to 11 x 1.6 inches, are bright green.
The large scarlet buds open into bright yellow flowers, up to 2 inches across, during summer into fall.
They are followed by attractive woody capsules up to 1.5 inches across.
The bark is smooth and white.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 23 F requiring 18+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers a Mediterranean climate.

Eucalyptus erythronema ( Red-Flowered Mallee )
A fast growing small tree reaching a maximum size of 33 x 23 feet, that is native to Western Australia.
The narrow lance-shaped leaves, up to 4 x 0.5 inches, are glossy green.
The deep red flowers are borne in clusters of 3 or 7.
Thee bark is powdery white often with pink, red and gray tints mixed in.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 17 F requiring 13+ inches of average yearly rainfall.

Eucalyptus eugenioides ( Thin-leaved Stringybark )
Some records include: largest on record - 200 x 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 6 x 1.3 inches, are reddish-purple at first, turning to blue-green above, bright blue beneath. The foliage is very attractive.
The twigs are deep red.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 ( tolerating 8 F ), requiring 24 to 40 inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers cold winters and hot summers.

Eucalyptus fastigiata ( Brown Barrel )
A fast growing large tree, native to southeastern Australia, that is closely related to Eucalyptus regnans. Some records include: 11 years - 100 feet; largest on record - 170 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 feet.
The leaves are up to 7 inches in length.
The flowers are creamy-white.
The bark is rough, stringy, shredded and fibrous.
The wood is highly valuable.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 tolerating as low as 10 F requiring 30 to 50 inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers cool climates and is snow tolerant. Thrives in milder parts of England.

Eucalyptus formanii
A moderate growing, small multi-trunked tree reaching a maximum size of 35 x 25 feet.
The foliage is glossy and very deep green.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 tolerating as low as 15 F

Eucalyptus forrestiana ( Fuschia Gum )
A very ornamental, dense canopied tree often used to line streets in semi-desert climates, is native to Western Australia. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; largest on record - 40 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of feet.
The leaves, up to 4 x 1 inches, are deep green.
The showy red flower buds, up to 2 inches in length, open to reveal vibrant yellow stamens during summer into fall. They are followed by showy red fruits.
The smooth gray bark peels in long strips during late summers.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 requiring 15+ inches of average yearly rainfall.

Eucalyptus fraxinoides ( White Ash )
A rapid growing, narrow, dense, tall tree native to southeastern Australia.
Some records include: 7 years - 40 feet ( England ); 16 years - 91 feet with a trunk diameter of 14 inches; 25 years - 142 feet with a trunk diameter of 20 inches; largest on record - 200 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet.
The curved leaves, up to 8 x 2 inches, are glossy green above, bright blue to purplish beneath. The foliage is very attractive.
The large clusters of profuse white flowers are borne during summer.
The showy, smooth whitish bark peels in long strips. On older trees there is fibrous bark on the very low part of the trunk.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 tolerating as low as 9 F requiring 40 to 60 inches of average yearly rainfall. Requires a cool moist climates with cold winters.

Eucalyptus gardneri
Some records include: largest on record - 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 inches.

Eucalyptus glaucescens ( Tingiringi Gum )
A very fast growing tree native to mountain forests of southeastern Australia.
Some records include: 5 years - 20 feet; 8 years - 27 x 13 feet; 20 years - 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.8 feet; largest on record - 170 feet with a trunk diameter of 4.5 feet.
The aromatic "juvenile" foliage, up to 1.6 x 1.6 inches, on young trees is rounded and bluish-gray. The leathery "adult" leaves on older trees is narrow, up to 6 x 1 inches, are luxuriant blue-green.
The white flowers are borne during autumn.
The bark is smooth and white, peeling in short narrow reddish strips. The bark on the very lowest part of the trunk is fibrous.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 tolerating as low as -2 F requiring 20 to 60 inches of average yearly rainfall. Enjoys Mediterranean climates but also thrives in the Pacific Northwest and England ( exceeds 70 feet ).

Eucalyptus globoides ( White Stringybark )
A dense, rounded, heavy-set, large tree that is native to New South Wales in Australia. Some records include: 5 years - 20 feet; largest on record - 140 x 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
Hardy zones 9 ( est ).

Eucalyptus globulis ( Tasmanian Blue Gum )
A straight trunked, very large tree reaching up to 250 feet or sometimes more, that is native to forests of Tasmania and isolated parts of nearby southern Victoria, however has been planted around much of the world, now growing wild in many places.
Some records include: fasstest recorded growth rate - 20 feet; 6 months from seed - 7 feet; 7 years - 50 feet; 9 years - 66 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.8 feet; 12 years - 92 feet; 20 years - 166 x 57 feet; 32 years - trunk diameter of 3.5 feet ( Ireland ); 90 years - 240 feet ( Catalina Island, California ); 107 years - 260 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 feet ( India ); 125 years - trunk diameter of 8 feet; 140 years - trunk diameter of 10 feet; largest on record - 400 x 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 16 feet; largest in U.S. - 260 feet in California; largest in Portugal - 263 feet ( was 240 feet in 1875 ).
The aromatic "juvenile" leaves on young trees, up to 3 x 3 ( rarely 6 x 3.2 ) inches are round and blue-green.
the leathery "mature" leaves on older trees is sickle-shaped, up to 20 x 3 inches, and glossy deep green.
The singular, stalkless, creamy-white flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne during spring.
The dark bluish-gray bark shreds into long ribbons to expose white beneath.
Hardy zones 8b to 11 (tolerating as low as 15 F )requiring 24 to 50 inches of average yearly rainfall. Heat tolerant but grows taller in cooler climates.
Requires 70 or less frost days per year.
A 133 foot tree in Christchurch, New Zealand was reported to be scale resistant ( unusual for species ).


* photos taken on January 2007 in Vina Del Mar, Chile




* photo of unknown internet source

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo taken by H.D. Tiemann @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Eucalyptus gomphocephala
Some records include: largest on record - 140 x 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 feet. The lance-shaped leaves are up to 8 x 2 inches.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 requiring 12+ inches of average yearly rainfall.

Eucalyptus goniocalyx ( Olive Bark Gum )
A fast growing large tree. Some records include: 15 years - 111 feet with a trunk diameter of 13 inches; largest on record - 200 feet with a trunk diameter of 8 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 10 x 1.5 inches, are blue-green.
The flowers are white.
The rough, deeply fissured bark is gray.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 tolerating as low as 6 F. Thrives in Ireland, it is also heat and drought tolerant and grows in the southern U.S.

Eucalyptus grandis ( Flooded Gum )
A straight trunked, massive tree that is among the fastest growing of all hardwoods worldwide is native to coastal parts of eastern Australia.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 13 feet; 4 years - 52 feet; 7 years - trunk diameter of 8 inches; 9 years - 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 10 inches; 41 years - 172 feet; largest on record - 250 x 85 feet with a trunk diameter of 11 feet; longest lived - 400 years. It is often found in forestry plantations in Australia as well as California and South Africa.
The narrow leaves, up to 8 x 1.5 inches, are deep green and make good forage for Koalas.
The white flowers are borne in small clusters during winter.
The bark is smooth and powdery white except for the very lowest part of the trunk.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 requiring 36+ inches of average yearly rainfall.

Eucalyptus gregsoniana ( Wolgan Snow Gum )
Also called Eucalyptus pauciflora var 'nana'. It is typically a small tree native to a tiny area in the mountains west of Sydney in Australia.
Some records include: 5 years - 20 feet; 29 years - 43 feet with a trunk diameter of 22 inches; largest on record - 63 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.5 feet.
The thick, leathery, narrow leaves, up to 5 x 1 inches, are glossy, gray-green on both sides.
The small white flowers are borne in early summer.
The very attractive bark is smooth and white.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 tolerating as low as 3 F. Requires very well drained soil, is tolerant of clay, sand, cold conditions and snow.

Eucalyptus grossa ( Course-Leafed Mallee )
A mallee shrub typically reaching around 10 feet but someitimes growing into a straggly small tree, that is native to Western Australia.
Some records include: largest on record - 20 x 20 feet.
The thick leaves, up to 6 x 2 inches, are glossy green.
The large yellow flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne in large clusters during winter and spring.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 requiring 10+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Requires sandy loam soil. Prefers a Mediterranean climate and is drought tolerant.

Eucalyptus gunnii ( Cider Gum )
A broadly columnar to eventually spreading, large tree native to mountains of Tasmania. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 7 feet; 5 years - 23 feet; 11 years - 60 x 22 feet; 20 years - 120 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 22 inches; 35 years - trunk diameter of 2.5 feet; 100 years - trunk diameter of 6 feet; largest on record - 140 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 6.5 feet. Thrives in England, reached 110 feet in Ireland and has exceeded 100 feet in New Zealand. Cider Gum has been used for land reclaimation in mainland Italy, Sicily and Spain. It makes an excellent shade tree.
The oppositely arranged, stem clasping, attractive, rounded, aromatic "juvenile" leaves are gray-blue. The leathery "adult" leaves on older trees, are longer and narrower, up to 5 x 1.5 inches. The adult foliage is silver at first, turning to gray-green.
The small, creamy-white flowers are borne in clusters of 3 during spring and summer.
The smooth bark is patterned grayish-pink, red-brown and green, shedding in late summer revealing fresh white bark beneath.
Hardy zones 7 to 10 tolerating as low as -5 F requiring 32+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Tolerant of cold and very wet conditions as well as frequent snow and clay soil. It requires 150 or more frost free days per year. Cider Gum may also be grown as a foliage perennial tolerating as low as -10 F. This is among the best Eucalyptus for the southeastern U.S. Many trees sold in the U.S. are not of the hardiest clones thus ending up disappointing gardeners trying to grow cold hardy Eucalyptus...seed source is important.

* excellent video found on internet



'Blue Ice'
Hardy with very blue foliage.

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC


'Silver Drop'
Very hardy with larger silver leaves. Survived the severe 2003 winter in Washington, D.C.

Eucalyptus haemastoma ( Broad-Leafed Scrubby Gum )
A multi-trunked, medium size tree reaching a maximum size of 70 x 20 feet that is native to bushland around Sydney.
The thick, curved leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are shiny mid green.
The foliage is foraged on by Koalas.
The small white flowers are borne from fall into spring.
The attractive bark is white.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 preferring a mild climates and sandy, very well drained soil.

Eucalyptus hemiphloia
Some records include: 47 years - 72 feet; largest on record - 100 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet.
The leaves are up to 5 x 4 inches.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 tolerating as low as 18 F

Eucalyptus intermedia
Some records include: largest on record - 233 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet.
The leaves are up to 8 inches in length.

Eucalyptus jacksonii ( Red Tingle )
A dense canopied, stately gigantic tree that is among the largest of all trees native to Western Australia where it is native. Some records include: 22 years - 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 16 inches; largest on record - 250 feet with a trunk diameter of 21 feet; longest lived - 400 years.
The narrow leaves, up to 7 x 1 inches, are glossy bright green.
The small, white flowers are borne during summer.
The bark is brownish and stringy.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 requiring 48 to 60 inches of average yearly rainfall. enjoying cool Mediterranean climates.

Eucalyptus johnsonii ( Tasmanian Yellow Gum )
An attractive, straight-trunked, stately large tree that is native to Tasmania.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 7 feet; 5 years - 23 feet; 15 year - 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.2 feet; 20 years - 87 feet; 25 years - 95 feet; 120 years - 127 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 feet ( Ireland ); largest on record - 200 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 feet.
The attractive narrow leaves, up to 7 x 1 inches, are luxuriant bright green.
The attractive bark, similar to that of Eucalyptus deglupta, is peeling, showing yellow, orange and green.
Hardy zones 7 to 9, mature trees can tolerate as low as -7 F and trees are known to resprout from the ground at -12 F. Flood tolerant.

Eucalyptus kitsoniana ( Gippsland Mallee )
An attractive small tree that is native to Victoria in Australia.
Some records include: 27 years - 27 feet with a trunk diameter of 9 inches ( Dublin, IR ); largest on record - 27 feet.
The large leaves are blue-green.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 ( tolerating as low as 8 F and recovering fast from freeze damage ).

Eucalyptus kruseana ( Kruse's Mallee )
Also called Bookleaf Mallee. A large mallee shrub reaching a maximum size of 18 x 12 feet.
The oppositely arranged, stalkless leaves, up to 0.7 x 0.8 inches, are gray-blue.
The powdery pink, conical buds open to reveal spectacular yellow flowers late autumn into winter.
The gray-brown bark is smooth through often does sheds.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 thriving in dry climates requiring as little as 8 inches of average yearly rainfall.

Eucalyptus kybeanensis ( Kybean Mallee Ash )
A very attractive, moderate growing, multi-trunked tree, reaching around 25 x 20 feet, that is native to southeastern Australia. Some records include: 15 years - 57 feet with a trunk diameter of 11 inches ( England ).
The lance-shaped, willow-like leaves are blue-green above, bluish-white beneath.
The flowers are white.
The attractive bark ranges from smooth to peeling.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 ( tolerating 4 F ).

* excellent video found on internet


Eucalyptus lacrimans
A small, upright, narrow tree with a strong central leader and pendulous side branches. It is native to southeastern Australia. Some records include: largest on record - 33 feet with a trunk diameter of 10 inches.
The ovate to elliptical leaves are silvery-blue.
The attractive bark is peeling.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 ( tolerating as low as -6 F ). Thrives in milder parts of England.

Eucalyptus laophlila
Some records include: 18 years - 20 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 inches.

Eucalyptus largiflorens ( Black Box )
A large massive tree that is similar in appearance to the Live Oak.
Some records include: largest on record - 82 x 82 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet.
The drooping leaves, up to 7 x 0.7 inches, are gray-green.
The bark is rough and black.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 requiring 10+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Very tolerant of heat and also tolerant of flooding, drought, salt and lime.

Eucalyptus lehmannii ( Bushy Yate )
An ornamental fast growing, mallee shrub or low branched, dense, rounded small tree native to the southern coastal part of Western Australia. Some records include: 17 years - 35 x 15 feet; largest on record - 50 x 27 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are deep green.
The showy, large, yellow flowers are borne winter into early spring.
Woody fruits, up to 3 inches across follow.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 requiring 18+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Extremely heat tolerant as well as tolerant of drought, sandy soil, salt and coastal areas.

Eucalyptus leucophloia ( Snappy Gum )
Also called Mignum. A tree reaching a maximum height of 33 feet that is native to northern Australia.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 4 x 1 inches, are whitish-gray.
The creamy-white flowers are borne autumn into winter.
The bark is smooth, powdery white.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 requiring a warm, nearly tropical climates with distinct wet and dry seasons.

Eucalyptus leucoxylon ( South Australian Blue Gum )
Also called Yellow Gum. An attractive, very fast growing, semi-pendulous, moderately dense, straight trunked tree that is native to moist forested parts of southern Australia as well as cooler high elevations within the central Australian desert.
Some records include: 5 years - 17 feet; 14 years - 27 feet; 20 years - 50 x 25 feet; largest on record - 103 x 72 feet with a trunk diameter of 6.5 feet.
Moderately long-lived, it can persist for at least 200 years.
The aromatic, narrow, lance-shaped leaves, up to 8 x 1.3 inches, are gray-green.
The profuse cream of white flowers, up to 1.3 inches across, are borne in hanging clusters of 3 late fall through to spring. Forms with showy yellow, pink and red flowers exist. The nectar rich flowers are highly valuable for honey production.
The smooth bark can be blue-gray or creamy-yellow, shedding in flakes.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( tolerating as low as 14 F with isolated reports as low as 8 F ) requiring 16+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers high rainfall climates but is very tolerant of heat and drought.

Eucalyptus ligustrina ( Privet-Leafed Stringybark )
A fast growing, dense-crowned, small tree that is native to southeastern Australia. Some records include: 5 years - 20 feet; largest on record - 33 feet.
The ovate, privet-like leaves are luxuriant mid-green.
Hardy zones 8 to 9.

Eucalyptus longifolia ( Woollybutt )
A fast growing tree native to eastern Australia.
Some records include: 10 years - 67 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 inches; largest on record - 130 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.5 feet.
The curved, hanging leaves, up to 10 x 2 inches, are blue-gray.
The profuse, creamy-white flowers are borne in hanging clusters of 3 during spring.
The nectar rich flowers are valuable for honey production.
The bark on the upper trunk and branches is smooth and whitish-gray. On the lower trunk of mature trees it is rough and gray.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 tolerating as low as 20 F requiring inches of average yearly rainfall.

Eucalyptus luehmanniana ( Yellow-Top Ash )
A moderate growing, small, multiple trunked, irregularly crowned tree is native locally to the area close to Sydney, Australia. Some records include: largest on record - 55 x 90 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet.
The thick, sickle-shaped leaves, up to 7 x 1.7 inches, are glossy green.
The creamy-yellow flowers are borne during spring.
The smooth white bark sheds in long strips.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 on sandy, well drained soil.

Eucalyptus macarthurii ( Camdon Woollybutt )
A fast growing, dense, massive, large tree that is native to southeastern Australia.
Some records include: 32 years - 110 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet; largest on record - 133 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet.
The leaves are up to 8 inches in length.
The bark is gray-brown and fibrous.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 ( older trees are hardier and can tolerate as low as 5 F ).
It is very heat tolerant, thriving in the southwest and southern U.S. It is also tolerant of clay soil.

Eucalyptus macranda
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; largest on record - 35 feet.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 tolerating as low as 8 F requiring inches of average yearly rainfall.

Eucalyptus macrocarpa ( Mottlecah )
An attractive mallee shrub or small tree native to Western Australia.
Some records include: largest on record - 28 x 40 feet.
The stem clasping, thick, broad ovate leaves, up to 5 x 3 inches, are silvery-blue.
The showy red flowers, up to 7 inches across, are borne late winter into spring. Both the flowers and woody capsules, up to 4 inches across that follow, are the largest of any Eucalyptus.
The stems and bark are powdery gray.
Hardy zones 8b to 10 tolerating as low as 10 F requiring inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers a Mediterranean climate and requires low humidity and very well drained soil. Extremely heat tolerant.

Eucalyptus macrocorys
A tall tree reaching a maximum height of 170 feet.

Eucalyptus macrorhyncha ( Red Stringybark )
A straight trunked, dense, rounded, medium size tree native to southeasstern Australia.
Some records include: 5 years - 20 feet; 19 years - 33 feet; largest on record - 120 x 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 8 x 1 inches, are deep green.
Up to 7 or more white flowers are borne in clusters during summer into early fall.
The fibrous, stringy bark is reddish-brown.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 ( tolerating as low as 6 F ) requiring 24 to 32 inches of average yearly rainfall. It is moderately drought tolerant.

Eucalyptus maidenii ( Maiden's Gum )
A fast growing, straight trunked, very tall tree closely related to Eucalyptus globulus, that is native to southeastern Australia. Some records include: 8 years - 81 feet with a trunk diameter of 8 inches; 31 years - 140 feet with a trunk diameter of 20 inches; largest on record - 250 x 71 feet with a trunk diameter of 8 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 12 x 2 inches, are glossy green.
The flower clusters borne fall into spring contain 7 creamy-white flowers.
The smooth bark is bluish-white, yellow and gray shedding in long narrow strips.
The timber is very valuable for construction and paper pulp.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 ( tolerating as low as 7 F ) requiring 30 to 60 inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers cool summers.

Eucalyptus mannifera ( Brittle Gum )
An attractive, open medium size tree that is a widespread in southeastern Australia.
It is frequently planted as a street tree in suitable climates.
Some records include: 5 years - 20 feet; 20 years - 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 10 inches; largest on record - 100 x 45 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet.
The hanging, narrow, willow-like leaves, up to 8 inches in length, are gray-green.
The white flowers are borne in clusters summer and autumn.
The young twigs are deep red.
The beautiful bark is powdery white and smooth, with ribbons that shed and turn reddish before falling.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 ( tolerating as low as 4 F ) requiring 20 to 40 inches of average yearly rainfall. Heat tolerant in the southern U.S. as well as tolerant of clay, rock and Mediterranean climates.

Eucalyptus marginata ( Jarrah )
A straight trunked, somewhat dense, very large tree that is a dominent component of the hardwood forests in far southwest Australia. Some records include: 19 years - 45 feet; largest on record - 200 feet with a trunk diameter of 10 feet. Roots as deep as 133 feet have been found on this tree enabling it to survive drought.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 7 x 1.5 inches, are deep green.
The creamy-white flowers are borne in clusters during spring.
They are very rich in nectar.
The reddish-brown bark is fibrous and rough.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 requiring 28 to 55 inches of average yearly rainfall.

Eucalyptus megacarpa
Reaches up to 100 feet.
The leaves are up to 7 inches in length.
The bark is white.

Eucalyptus megacornuta ( Warty Yate )
A highly ornamental, fairly open, small tree reaching a maximum size of 40 x 25 feet, that is native to the Ravensthorpe Range in the southern part of Western Australia.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet.
The sickle-shaped leaves, up to 3.5 inches in length, are dull green.
Large bud caps, up to 2 inches in length, reveal attractive yellowish-green flowers, up to 2 inches across, during spring.
The smooth gray bark is patched with red and green.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 requiring 16+ inches of average yearly rainfall.
Prefers sandy well drained soil. Tolerant of gravel.

Eucalyptus melanophloia ( Silver-Leafed Ironbark )
A tree reaching a maximum height of 100 feet that is native over a wide region of northeastern Australia.
Some records include: 20 years - 55 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 requiring 18 to 34 inches of average yearly rainfall.
Prefers a Mediterranean climate, it is extremely heat tolerant as well as drought tolerant.

Eucalyptus melliodora ( Yellow Box )
Also called Honey Gum. A tall tree native to eastern Australia that makes an excellent shade tree.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; largest on record - 250 x 82 feet with a trunk diameter of 8 feet.
The narrow leaves, up to 7 x 1 inches, is gray-green. The foliage of this tree is a favorite food of the Koala Bear.
The profuse sweetly fragrant flowers borne during summer are white or sometimes pink.
The nector rich flowers are highly valuable for honey production.
The bark on the upper trunk and limbs is smooth and white; fibrous and rough on the lower trunk.
Hardy zones 8b to 11 ( tolerating as low as 15 F ) requiring 16 to 40 inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers a Mediterranean climate with cool winters.

Eucalyptus microcorys ( Tallowwood )
A dense, spreading crowned, large tree that is a widespread native to coastal parts of eastern Australia. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 12 feet; 5 years - 50 feet; 10 years - 82 feet; largest on record - 233 x 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 10 feet. Tallowwood is valuable for shade trees and shelterbelt.
The thin "adult" leaves, up to 5 x 1.5 inches, are deep green.
The showy creamy-white flowers are borne in clusters during winter into early summer.
The bark is fibrous and reddish-brown. The timber is highly valuable.
Hardy zones 8 to 12 tolerating as low as F requiring 40+ inches of average yearly rainfall.

Eucalyptus microtheca ( Coolabah )
A very attractive, fast growing, broad-spreading medium size tree.
Some records include: largest on record - 70 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet. Young trees will often resemble the Weeping Willow in appearance.
The narrow, willow-like leaves, up to 8 inches in length, are blue-green.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 ( tolerating as low as 7 F ) requiring 10+ inches of average yearly rainfall.
Very adaptable, it thrives in the Pacific Northwest as well as much of the southwest and south. It has potential as a drought tolerant landscape tree in Austin and San Antonio, Texas. It tolerates flooding and is often found in floodplains in the wild.

Eucalyptus mitchelliana ( Mount Buffalo Gum )
A beautiful, very fast growing, medium-sized tree, related to E. stellulata, that is native to the Mount Buffalo Plateau in Victoria state in Australia.
Some records include: 35 years - 105 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet.
The very narrow, willow-like foliage is blue-green.
Hardy zones 7b to 9 ( tolerating 2 F ) in cool maritime climates, it thrives in much of the British Isles.

Eucalyptus moluccana ( Coast Gray Box )
A large tree native to open forests of the east coast of Australia where it is abundant. Some records include: largest on record - 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet.
The thick leaves are glossy green.
The flowers borne during summer are small and white. The flowers are rich in nectar and valuable for honey production.
The bark is light grayish-brown. The timber is highly valuable.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 requiring 20 to 40 inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers a Mediterranean climate.

Eucalyptus moorei ( Narrow-leaved Sallee )
A small to medium-sized tree that is native to New South Wales in Australia.
Some records include: 18 years - 43 feet with a trunk diameter of 40 inches; largest on record - 63 feet ( England ).
The very narrow, blue-green foliage resembles that of the Olive.
Hardy zones 7b to 9 ( tolerating as low as 2 F ). Flood tolerant.

Eucalyptus morrisbyi ( Morrisby's Gum )
A very beautiful, small tree that is native to Tasmania where it is rare.
Reaches a maximum height of 27 feet.
The foliage is blue-gray.
The showy bark is smooth.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 ( tolerating as low as 4 F ).

Eucalyptus muelleriana ( Yellow Stringbark )
A large tree native to Victoria in Australia.
Some records include: 5 years - 20 feet; 30 years - 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 14 inches; 98 years - 120 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.5 feet; largest on record - 200 feet with a trunk diameter of 11 feet.
The leaves are up to 8 inches in length.
The flowers are white.
The bark is stringy.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 requiring 28 to 48 inches of average yearly rainfall. Clay tolerant.

Eucalyptus neglecta ( Omeo Gum )
A medium-sized tree that is native to Victoria in southeastern Australia.
Some records include: 10 years - 30 feet; 29 years - 37 x 45 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet; largest on record - 82 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet.
The blue leaves are up to 6 x 5 inches.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 tolerating as low as -8 F ( with an isolated tree surviving -17 F in Cincinnati, Ohio only to be killed later by a longer but less severe freeze ). This is the most cold hardy of all Eucalyptus. Very heat tolerant as well as tolerant of wet soil, drought and shade. The Omeo Gum has excellent potential as a landscape tree in the southern U.S. and milder parts of the Mid Atlantic region.

Eucalyptus nicholii ( Narrow-Leafed Black Peppermint )
A beautiful, fast growing, graceful, weeping, rounded tree native to eastern Australia that is popular to street plantings and shade. Some records include: 20 years - 100 x 33 feet; largest on record - 100 x 60 feet.
The aromatic "juvenile" leaves, up to 2 x o.2 inches, are blue-green.
The very narrow, sickle-shaped "adult" leaves, up to 5 x 0.3 inches, are purplish at first turning to blue-green.
The small white flowers are borne during autumn.
The bark is fibrous and red.
Hardy zones 7b to 11 ( tolerating as low as 4 F ) requiring 27+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Very tolerant of heat, drought and clay. Seed source is important in determining hardiness and unfortunately most trees of this species sold in the U.S. are not the hardiest provenences and are only hardy north to zone 8b.

Eucalyptus niphophila ( Snow Gum )
An open spreading medium size tree of high mountains in southeastern Australia.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; 5 years - 20 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot; 20 years - 50 x 40 feet; largest on record - 85 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 33 inches.
The aromatic "juvenile" leaves, up to 1.6 x 1 inches on young trees are rounded and dull blue-green.
The leathery, broadly lance-shaped "adult" leaves, up to 5.5 x 2 inches, are glossy deep blue-green.
The profuse creamy-white flowers are borne in axilliary clusters spring into summer.
The showy white bark sheds in narrow strips revealing fresh white bark with patches of red, orange, yellow and olive-green.
Hardy zones 6b to 9 tolerating as low as -10 F. Requires very well drained soil. It is also hardy north of zone 6 as a 4 foot foliage perennial if cut back and mulched during winter.
Tolerates windy seashore conditions.

* excellent video found on internet


Eucalyptus nitens ( Shining Gum )
A very fast growing, dense, straight-trunked, tall tree native to wet mountain forests in southeastern Australia. Some records include: 5 years - 33 feet; 24 years - 130 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.5 feet; largest on record - 300 x 66 feet with a trunk diameter of 13 feet; largest in Washington State - 60 feet @ Vashon Island.
The narrow leaves, up to 12 x 1 inches, are glossy deep green.
The white flowers are borne during summer. They are nectar rich and valuable for the production of honey.
The bark is smooth and silvery. The timber is valuable for construction.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 ( tolerating as low as 3 F ) requiring 30+ inches of average yearly rainfall. It prefers cool summers and in fact snow occurs during winter in most of its native range. It can tolerate as many as 150 frost days per year.
This tree thrives in New Zealand, the British Isles and in the Pacific Northwest of North America.

Eucalyptus nitida ( Smithton Peppermint )
A beautiful, fast growing, dome-canopied tall tree, that is native to Tasmania. Some records include: 37 years - 90 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet; 57 years - trunk diameter of 3.5 feet; largest on record - 136 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.5 feet.
The leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are glossy green. The flowers are white.
The fibrous bark is gray.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 tolerating as low as 5 F requiring inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers cool winters and cool summers.

Eucalyptus nobilis ( Forest Ribbon Gum )
A fast growing, striaght-trunked, upright, very large, evergreen tree, reaching up to 258 feet in height. It is closely related to Eucalyptus viminalis but is native to 3000 + foot elevations in the New England Tablelands in southeastern Australia.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 8 x 1.3 inches in size, are glossy green.
The bark is smooth and white on the upper trunk. On the lower trunk on older trees; the bark becomes gray, green and yellow and sheds in long ribbons.
Hardy zones 8b to 9 ( tolerating as low as 10 F ). It may be suitable for the southeastern U.S. however more testing is needed.

Eucalyptus notabilis ( Blue Mountains Mahogany )
A large tree that is native to the Blue Mountains near Sydney, Australia.
Some records include: largest on record - 100 feet.
Hardy zones 8b to 9

Eucalyptus nova-anglica ( New England Peppermint )
Very closely related to Eucalyptus cinerea but extremely fast growing and even hardier. Some records include: largest on record - 82 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 feet.
The deeply furrowed bark is black.
Hardy zones 7 yo 9 ( tolerating as low as -2 F - may resprout from lower
temperatures ). Tolerant of cold climates, arid climates, heat, flooding and clay.

Eucalyptus obliqua ( Messmate )
A somewhat dense, long lived gigantic tree native to temperate forests in the southern part of eastern Australia. Some records include: 16 years - 114 feet with a trunk diameter of 14 inches; 34 years - 145 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet; largest on record - 300 x 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 22.5 feet.
The leaves, up to 8 x 2 inches, are glossy deep green.
The abundant creamy-white flowers are borne in large clusters during summer and fall.
The bark is brown and fibrous. The highly valuable timber is very strong and durable.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 ( tolerating as low as 4 F - unfortunately most trees sold outside native range are not of hardiest seed source ). It can also tolerate as many as 100 frost days per year. Messmate requires 20 to 96 inches of average yearly rainfall and thrives in England.

Eucalyptus oblonga
A medium size tree reaching a maximum height of 66 feet.
The leaves are up to 6 inches in length.
The flowers are white.
Hardy north to zone 8

Eucalyptus occidentalis ( Flat Top Yate )
Some records include: 37 years - 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot; largest on record - 100 x 33 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet.
The leaves are up to 7 inches in length.
The attractive flowers are yellow.
The bark is smooth and white.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 tolerating as low as F requiring 12 inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers a cool Mediterranean climate and is very tolerant of both heat, drought, clay, salt as well as flooding.

Eucalyptus oleosa ( Red Mallee )
A moderate growing, multiple stemmed, low branched, dome canopied mallee tree native to dry parts of southern Australia. Some records include: largest on record - 40 x 33 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.5 feet.
The narrow leaves, are glossy green.
The profuse bright yellow flowers are borne in large clusters from spring into summer.
The bark on the lower parts of the trunk is rough, on the upper parts of the stems are smooth and peeling.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 tolerating as low as F requiring 8 to 18 inches of average yearly rainfall. Very drought and extremely heat tolerant.

Eucalyptus olsenii ( Woila Gum )
A rare tree reaching a maximum height of 70 feet with a tiny natural range in a mountainous area in southeastern Australia.
The narrow leaves are red at first, turning to glossy green.
The bright yellow flowers are borne during summer.
The smooth white bark sheds in narrow strips late summer into fall.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 ( tolerating as low as 6 F on older well established plants only ) on sandy well drained soil.

Eucalyptus orbifolia ( Round-Leafed Mallee )
An ornamental mult-stemmed mallee shrub reaching a maximum height of 25 feet that is native to drier regions of soutern Western Australia.
The rounded leaves, up to 1.5 inches, are lush green. The leaves have an indented tip.
The yellow flowers, up to 1 inches across, are produced profusely winter into early spring.
The stems are powdery gray.
The smooth red-brown bark peels in long narrow strips revealing fresh green bark beneath.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 requiring 10+ inches of average yearly rainfall.

Eucalyptus oreades ( Blue Mountain Ash )
A straight tall tree native to moist mountain forests of eastern Australia.
Some records include: 22 years - 103 feet; largest on record - 133 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 feet.
The leaves are up to 9 inches in length.
The white flowers are borne during summer.
The smooth white bark sheds in long narrow strips.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 tolerating as low as 9 F requiring 30+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefes moist climates and cold winters, thrives especially well in New Zealand.

Eucalyptus ovata ( Swamp Gum )
Some records include: 5 years - 27 feet; 20 years - 90 feet with a trunk diameter of 17 inches; 35 years - 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 32 inches; largest on record - 120+ x 90 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
The leaves are up to 6 x 2 inches.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 ( tolerating as low as 10 or possibly even 6 F ). It likes moisture and is clay, heat and flood tolerant. Can survive as a perennial down to -12 F

Eucalyptus pachyphylla ( Red Bud Mallee )
A moderate growing, single or multi-trunked mallee shrub reaching a maximum height of 20 feet that is native to central Australia, often on red sands.
The broad leaves, up to 5.5 x 1.5 inches, are gray-green.
The showy bright yellow flowers are borne during winter and spring.
The stems are red and the smooth gray bark peels in long strips.
Hardy zones 8 to 11. Hate summer humidity and is very tolerant of heat and drought.

Eucalyptus paniculata ( Gray Ironbark )
A straight tall tree native to coastal eastern Australia.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 9 feet; 10 years - 65 feet; largest on record - 170 x 111 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
The leaves, up to 6 x 1 inches, are deep green.
The white flowers are borne in small clusters late autumn into winter.
The gray bark is deeply furrowed. This tree is highly valued for its dark red timber that is durable and very strong.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 20 F requiring 35 to 50 inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers somewhat cool winters.

Eucalyptus parvifolia ( Small Leaved Gum )
A rare, elegant, semi-weeping, dense medium size tree with smooth white bark.
Some records include: 9 years - 44 feet with a trunk diameter of 0.6 feet; largest on record - 70 x 70 feet with a trunk diameter of feet.
The aromatic, "juvenile" leaves, up to 1.3 x 0.7 inches, are blue-green.
The adult leaves are up to 8 x 0.8 inches.
The flowers are borne during summer.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 tolerating as low as 5 F known to recover from as low as -12 F. Heat, snow, lime and flood tolerant.

Eucalyptus parvula ( Kybean Gum )
An attractive, semi-pendulous, broad-spreading, medium,sized to large tree that is native to southeastern Australia from New South Wales into Victoria.
Some records include: 5 years - 13 feet; largest on record - 86 feet with a trunk diameter of 32 inches.
The juvenile leaves are small and rounded. The adult leaves are lance-shaped, up to 3 inches in length.
The bark is smooth.
Hardy zones 7b to 9 ( toleraitng as low as -5 ), it is easy to grow and tolerant of flooding and limestone soils but is only tolerant of extreme heat if soil is moist.

Eucalyptus patens
Some records include: 35 years - 103 feet; largest on record - 103 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
The leaves are up to 7 x 1 inches.
Hardy zones 8 to 9

Eucalyptus pauciflora ( Ghost Gum )
An attractive, broadly spreading large tree native to high mountains of southeastern Australia and Tasmania.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 7 feet; 5 years - 17 feet; 20 years - 60 x 40 feet; 37 years - 76 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.5 feet; largest on record - 100 x 80 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
The aromatic, thick, rounded "juvenile" leaves on young trees, up to 2.5 inches in length, are gray-green.
The smooth, leathery "adult" leaves, up to 9 x 2 inches, are glossy blue-green.
The profuse white flowers borne in axilliary clusters of up to 12 during spring into summer. They are rich in nectar and are valuable in the production of Honey.
The smooth white bark is mottled with gray and sheds in patches.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 ( tolerating as low as -4 F ) requiring 24 to 76 inches of average yearly rainfall. Requires well drained soil. It prefers cool maritime climates but is tolerant of the occasional heatwave, wind and salt.
Does not like root disturbance so transplant while small.

'Debeuzevillei' ( Jounama Snow Gum )
Similar but is even hardier, tolerating as low as -8 F.

'Pendula'
A very attractive large tree similar to Weeping Willow in appearance.
The leaves are up to 9.5 x 4 inches.

Eucalyptus perriniana ( Shining Gum )
An attractive, very fast growing, open spreading, small tree native to high mountains of southeastern Australia.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 6 feet; 3 years - 17 feet; 16 years - 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet; largest on record - 82 x 56 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet.
The aromatic, rounded "juvenile" leaves on young trees are powdery gray and popular for use in flower arrangments.
The thick, lance-shaped, pendulous "adult" leaves, up to 8 x 1.5 inches, are purplish at first turning to blue-green.
The profuse axilliary flower clusters borne during late summer contain up to 3 creamy-white flowers.
The attractive brown bark sheds to reveal fresh smooth grayish-white bark.
Hardy zones 7b to 10 ( tolerating as low as -2 F though hardiness might vary depending on seed source ) requiring 25+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers cool climates and thrives in England. Tolerant of partial shade.
Trees severe damaged by hard freezes should be cut to near ground level during very early spring where they will regrow rapidly.

Eucalyptus pilularis ( Blackbutt )
A straight trunked, somewhat open, broad-crowned gigantic tree native to coastal areas of eastern Australia.
Some records include: 6 years - 47 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 inches; 40 years - 170 feet with a trunk diameter of 28 inches; largest on record - 250 x 120 feet with a trunk diameter of 11 feet.
The sickle-shaped leaves, up to 7 x 1.5 inches, are deep green above, pale green beneath.
The gray bark is smooth shedding in long strips on upper branches and on young trees; rough on the lower trunks of older trees. This tree is valued for its timber.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 20 F requiring 30 to 60 inches of average yearly rainfall. It requires consistant moisture and is not a Mediterranean climate tree. It thrives in the southeastern U.S. as far north as Savannah, GA.

Eucalyptus piperita ( Sydney Peppermint )
An attractive, single-trunked large tree, reaching a maximum height of 100 feet, that is native to New South Wales in Australia.
The leaves, up to 6.5 x 0.4 inches, are dull blue-green.
The bright yellow-green flowers are borne during late spring to early summer.
The bark on the branches and upper branches are smooth and white, the lower trunk dark and fibrous.
Hardy zones 8b to 9 ( tolerating 10 F ) thriving on somewhat dry upland soils in warm temperate climates.

Eucalyptus platypus ( Round-Leafed Moort )
A fast growing, medium size tree native to southern Western Australia that reaches a maximum size of 66 x 27 feet.
The lance-shaped to almost round "adult" leaves are olive green.
The very small yellow flowers are borne in clusters.
The bark is pinkish-gray.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 requiring 16+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Clay as well as moderately salt tolerant.

Eucalyptus polyanthemos ( Red Box )
A very fast growing, broad irregular round crowned tree native to southeast Australia.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 8 feet; 12 years - 45 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 inches; 20 years - 100 x 26 feet; 80 years - trunk diameter of 7 feet; largest on record - 160 x 110 feet with a trunk diameter of 8 feet.
Very long-lived, it can persist up to 400 years.
The oval leaves, up to 6 x 2 inches, are blue-gray.
The small white flowers are borne during spring.
The bark is often smooth and sheds on the upper trunk and limbs, reddish-brown and rough towards the base.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 ( tolerating as low as 14 F - though possibly acting as a perennial where even colder ) requiring 20 to 30 inches of average yearly rainfall. Thrives in Mediterranean climates and is very drought tolerant.

Eucalyptus polybractea ( Blue Mallee )
A moderate growing, small tree reaching a maximum size of 33 x 27 feet that is native to semi-arid parts of southeast Australia. It makes an excellent windbreak and screen.
The blue-gray leaves are used for distilling Eucalyptus oil.
The bark is smooth and gray on upper trunk, rough and fibrous towards the base.
The abundant creamy white flowers are borne autumn into spring.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 requiring 19+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers Mediterranean climates and is very drought and moderately salt tolerant.

Eucalyptus populnea ( Poplar Box )
A large crowned tree native to inland eastern Australia.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; largest on record - 82 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.5 feet. Poplar Box is an excellent shade and windbreak tree.
The oval leaves, up to 5 inches in length, are glossy green.
The small white flowers are borne during late summer.
The bark is fibrous.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 requiring 14 to 20 inches of average yearly rainfall.
Extremely heat and very drought and flood tolerant.

Eucalyptus porosa
Some records include: largest on record - 33 x 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 22 inches.

Eucalyptus preissiana ( Bell-Fruited Mallee )
A moderate growing, straggling mallee shrub reaching a maximum size of 17 x 33 feet that is native to the southern part of Western Australia.
The thick ovate leaves, up to 5 inches in length, are gray-green.
The showy bright yellow flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne in clusters of 3 during winter and spring. They open from large, pear-shaped red buds.
The gray bark is mottled or smooth.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 requiring 16+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers warm temperate to Mediterranean climates.

Eucalyptus propingua ( Small Fruited Gray Gum )
A tall tree native to forests from slightly north of Sydney to central coastal Queensland. Some records include: 42 years - 74 feet; largest on record - 150 x 80 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 6 x 1 inches, are glossy green above, light green beneath.
The white flowers are borne in clusters of 7 to 15 during summer and autumn.
The smooth bark is grayish, peeling off in ribbons to exposed fresh cream colored to orange bark beneath.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 tolerating as low as 20 F requiring 32 to 60 inches of average yearly rainfall. Requires fertile, well drained soil and consistant moisture.

Eucalyptus pryoriana ( Rough-barked Manna Gum )
A tree that is closely related to Eucalyptus viminalis but has rougher bark and is much shorter stature. Some records include: largest on record - 43 x 102 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet.
Hardy zones 8b to 9 ( tolerating 12 F ).

Eucalyptus pulchella ( White Peppermint )

A beautiful large tree that is native to Tasmania and is popular for street plantings in Australia. Some records include: 5 years - 20 feet; 19 years - 73 feet with a trunk diameter of 21 inches; largest on record - 100 x 80 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet.
The aromatic leaves are up to 6 inches in length. The flowers are cream colored.
The bark is smooth and white.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 ( tolerating as low as 8 F ). Prefers cool winters and summers.
It is tolerant of coastal conditions and temporary drought.

Eucalyptus pulverulenta ( Powder Gum )
A moderate growing, small tree native to southeastern Australia.
Some records include: 20 years - 90 x 27 feet; largest on record - 102 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.2 feet. It is a highly attractive, popular ornamental tree.
The round "juvenile" leaves, are silvery-blue.
This tree rarely produces "adult" leaves but when they do occur, they are around 4 x 2.2 inches and also silvery-blue.
Small axilliary clusters containing 3 white flowers are borne during spring.
The attractive bark is smooth and coppery or light brown peeling in long strips.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 tolerating as low as 6 F requiring 32+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Thrives in the British Islands.

Eucalyptus punctata ( Gray Gum )
A dense straight trunked tree native to open woodlands of southeast Australia.
Some records include: 36 years - 83 feet; largest on record - 120 x 75 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 feet. It makes an excellent shade tree.
The leaves, up to 8 inches in length, are glossy deep green.
The small white flowers are borne during summer.
The bark is smooth
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 20 F. Requires 28 + inches of average yearly rainfall and prefers light well drained soil. Very heat tolerant.

Eucalyptus pyriformis ( Dowerin Rose )
Also called Pear-Fruited Mallee.
A fast growing, multiple-stemmed mallee shrub reaching a maximum size of 20 x 20 feet that is native to Western Australia.
The thick leaves are gray-green.
The hanging red flowers are borne in clusters of 3 winter and spring.
The bark is smooth and pink.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 requiring 11 to 16 inches of rainfall per year. Extremely heat tolerant but requires excellent drainage.

Eucalyptus quadrangulata ( White Top Box )
Some records include: 28 years - 120 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet; largest on record - 170 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
The leaves are up to 8 inches in length.
The flowers are white.
The bark is gray.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 tolerating as low as 10 F requiring inches of average yearly rainfall.

Eucalyptus racemosa
Some records include: largest on record - 75 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet ( Ireland )

Eucalyptus radiata ( Narrow-Leafed Peppermint )
An attractive, upright to widespreading, pendulous crowned, large tree that is a widespread native to southeastern Australia. Some records include: largest on record - 170 x 80 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 feet; largest in Ireland - 63 feet.
The narrow leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are deep green and aromatic.
The leaves are used for the production of Eucalyptus oil.
The profuse white flowers are borne spring into summer.
The fibrous bark is gray.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 ( tolerating as low as 6 F ). It requires 26 to 50 inches of average yearly rainfall, or 80 or less frost days per year.

Eucalyptus raveritiana ( Black Ironbark )
A open crowned, straight trunked tree reaching a maximum size of 80 x 40 feet that is native to rainforest edges in Queensland, Australia.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 5 x 1 inches, are deep green.
The small white flowers are borne in large clusters during summer.
Hardy zones 10 to 12

Eucalyptus regnans ( Mountain Ash )
A tall straight trunked, open crowned, narrow tree native to cool mountains of southeastern Australia that is the worlds tallest hardwood.
Some records include: 20 months - 13 feet; 7 years - 100 feet; 24 years - trunk diameter of 3 feet; 30 years - 270 feet; 90 years - trunk diameter of 12 feet; largest on record - 500 feet with a trunk diameter of 25 feet; longest lived - 500 years.
Some exceptional trees recorded are:
500 feet - Watts River Australia ( 1800 )
470 feet - Mt. BawBaw, Victoria, Australia ( 1885 )
373 feet - largest recent tree
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 9 inches in length, are deep green.
The small white flowers are borne during summer.
The fibrous bark sheds in long ribbons to reveal smooth gray-green or whitish fresh bark beneath.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 ( with the hardiest seed source tolerating as low as 5 F ), requiring 30 + inches of average yearly rainfall or 80 or less frost days per year. Prefers a Mediterranean climate. an average coldest month temerature of 41 F and mildest month temperature of 63 F. Unlike some other Eucalyptus, this one does not resprout if frozen to the base.

* excellent video found on internet


Eucalyptus remota
Some records include: 14 years - 17 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 inches.

Eucalyptus resinifera
Some records include: 7 years - 62 feet; 12 years - 90 feet; largest on record - 200 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves are up to 9 x 3 inches.
Very heat tolerant.

Eucalyptus rhodantha ( Rose Mallee )
A rare spreading mallee reaching a maximum size of 12 x 18 feet, that is native to the sandplains in southwest Australia where it is endangered.
Some records include: 3 years - 6 feet.
The thick, rounded to heart-shaped leaves, up to 3 x 3 inches, are powdery gray.
The red flowers, up to 5 inches across, are solitary, borne spring into fall.
They are followed by wide capsules up to 2 inches across.
The branches are powdery whitish-gray and the bark is light brown and smooth.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 15 F. Requires full sun and acidic soil, as well as average yearly rainfall from 14 to 20 inches. Very heat as well as humidity tolerant.

Eucalyptus risdonii ( Risdon Peppermint )
A narrow small tree, native to a tiny part of Tasmania where it is endangered.
Some records include: 19 years - 42 feet with a trunk diameter of 10 inches.
The stem-clasping juvenile leaves are powdery-blue.
The flowers are abundantly produced.
The bark is smooth.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 ( tolerating as low as 8 F ) preferring maritime climates.

Eucalyptus robusta ( Swamp Mahogany )
An extremely fast growing, straight truned, dense, spreading crowned tree native to swamps in coastal Australia.
Some records include: 5 years - 30 feet; 15 years - 90 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet; 38 years - 180 feet; largest on record - 200 x 90 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
The thick leaves, up to 7 x 3 inches, are very deep green.
The foliage is foraged on by Koalas.
The white flowers borne spring into fall are nectar rich and valued in the production of honey.
The bark is reddish-brown and deeply furrowed.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 requiring 40 + inches of average yearly rainfall.
Very heat tolerant as well as tolerant of wet clay and coastal exposure.

Eucalyptus rodwayii ( Swamp Peppermint )
A fast growing tree reaching a maximum height of 86 feet, that is native to Tasmania.
Some records include: 25 years - 85 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet.
It is a close relative to Eucalyptus aggregata.
The leaves are up to 5 inches in length.
The bark is gray-brown.
Hardy zones 7b to 9 ( tolerating as low as -3 F ) preferring a maritime climate. Flood and clay tolerant.

Eucalyptus rubida ( Ribbon Gum )
Also called Candlebark Gum. A fast growing, very attractive, straight-trunked, rounded, large tree native to cool subalpine forests in southeastern Australia. Some records include: 5 years - 20 feet; largest on record - 150 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet; largest in Ireland - 82 feet. It is a close relative of Eucalyptus dalrympleana.
The narrow leaves, up to 10 x 1.5 inches, are gray-green.
The juvenile foliage is intensely powdery-blue.
The white flowers are borne late spring and summer.
The bark is creamy-white except in late summer when it develops reddish tints before shedding in late summer.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 ( tolerating as low as 3 F ) requiring 23 to 64 inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers cool moist conditions and is clay tolerant.

Eucalyptus rubiginosa
A tree reaching a maximum height of 70 feet that is native to Queensland, Australia.
The deep green, lance-shaped leaves are up to 6 x 1 inches.
The flowers are creamy-white.
The bark is red-brown and fibrous.
Hardy zone 10 to 11

Eucalyptus rudis ( Flooded Gum )
A fast growing, spreading, often weeping, large tree.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 5 feet; 30 years - 80 feet; largest on record - 100 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 feet.
The linear leaves, up to 6 x 1 inches, are gray-green.
The showy white flowers are borne spring and summer.
The rough gray bark peels on the branches.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 tolerating as low as 12 F requiring 18 to 36 inches of average yearly rainfall. Very drought tolerant, moderately drought tolerant as well as tolerant of flooding, wind and clay.

Eucalyptus rupicola ( Cliff Mallee Ash )
A multi-stemmed shrub to small tree, that is native to very high elevations in New South Wales in Australia.
Hardy zone 8 ( tolerating as low as 5 F ) in cool, moist maritime climates.

Eucalyptus saligna ( Sydney Blue Gum )
A handsome, straight trunked, tall tree native to forests of eastern Australia.
It is among the worlds fastest growing trees.
Some records include: 5 years - 105 feet; 24 years - 170 feet; 44 years - 236 feet; largest on record - 280 x 80 feet with a trunk diameter of 8 feet; largest in Hawaii - 236 feet.
The broad, tapered, lance-shaped leaves, up to 8 x 1.5 inches, are deep green.
The foliage is foraged on by Koalas.
The profuse white flowers are borne in dense clusters during summer.
The nectar rich flowers are valuable for honey production.
The showy bark is smooth and bluish-white.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 tolerating as low as 14 F requiring 32 to 72 inches of average yearly rainfall and 60 or less frost days per year. Clay as well as very heat tolerant.

Eucalyptus salmonophloia ( Salmon Gum )
A fast growing, straight, open crowned, tall tree native to Western Australia.
Some records include: 4 years - 8 feet; largest on record - 100 x 80 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.5 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 5 inches in length, are glossy bright green.
The small white flowers are borne in clusters during summer.
The nectar rich flowers are valuable for the production of honey.
The smooth bark is salmon-red. The strong timber is of high value.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 requiring 8 to 20 inches of average yearly rainfall. Extreme heat, salt, lime, drought and heavy clay tolerant.

Eucalyptus salubris ( Gimlet )
A very ornamental, rounded, medium size tree with a very twisted decorative trunk that is native to Western Australia.
Some records include: largest on record - 90 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.5 feet.
The leaves, up to 5 inches in length, are glossy deep green.
The white flowers are borne spring and summer.
The smooth bark is copper colored and shiny.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 20 F requiring 10 to 16 inches of average yearly rainfall preferring a Mediterranean Climate. Very drought, extremely heat, alkaline and heavy clay tolerant.

Eucalyptus sargentii
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; largest on record - 40 x 40 feet.
The leaves are up to 4 x 0.5 inches.
Hardy to 20 F.

Eucalyptus saxatilis ( Suggan Buggan Mallee )
An extremely rare, multi-stemmed tree reaching a maximum size of 37 x 10 feet that is native to a restricted area in the mountains of Victoria, Australia.
Moderately long-lived, it can live up to 200 years.
The oppositely arranged, round juvenile leaves are gray-blue.
The lance-shaped, "adult" leaves, up to 6 x 1 inches, are blue-green.
The foliage is very similar to that of Eucalyptus glaucescens.
The flowers are cream colored.
The smooth bark is a combination of cream, gray, green and yellow-orange.
Hardy zones 7b to 9 ( tolerating as low as 0 F or possibly even colder ).

Eucalyptus scoparia ( Wallangarra White Gum )
A very attractive, rapid growing, straight trunked, open, graceful, weeping medium- size tree reaching a maximum size of 60 x 60 feet. It is native to New South Wales in eastern Australia.
The pendulous, narrow, willow-like leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are glossy deep green.
The small creamy-white flowers are borne spring and summer.
The bark is smooth and white.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 ( tolerating as low as 7 F ).

Eucalyptus sepulcralis ( Weeping Gum )
A small, weeping Willow-like tree native to western Australia that reaches a maximum height of 27 feet.
The narrow tapering leaves, up to 4 inches, are bright green.
The showy yellow flowers are borne in summer.
The bark is smooth and white.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 requiring 20 + inches of average yearly rainfall.

Eucalyptus sideroxylon ( Red Ironbark )
A handsome pendulous tall tree native to southeastern Australia.
Some records include: 5 years - 17 feet; 20 years - 82 x 30 feet; 80 years - trunk diameter of 4 feet; largest on record - 120 x 66 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
The "juvenile" leaves, up to 6 x 2 inches are blue-green.
The narrow, pendulous leaves, up to 9 x 0.8 inches, are grayish-green.
The attractive white flowers are borne in pendulous clusters of 7 during winter into early spring. The nectar rich flowers are valuable for honey production.
The dark brown to nearly black bark is deeply furrowed.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 14 F requiring 18 to 26 inches of average yearly rainfall. Very drought as well as extremely heat tolerant as well as tolerant of clay.

'Rosea'
Pink or red flowers

'Tricarpa'
Longer leaves, up to 9 inches in length.

Eucalyptus sieberi ( Silver Top Ironbark )
Some records include: 6 years - 60 feet; 11 years - 70 feet; 22 years - 143 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet; 36 years - trunk diameter of 3.5 feet; largest on record - 170 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 4.5 feet.
The leaves are up to 8 x 2 inches.
The flowers are white.
The orange-brown bark is rough and flaky.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 tolerating as low as 18 F requiring 28 to 56 inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers cool summers and is clay tolerant.

Eucalyptus smithii ( Gully Gum )
A rapid growing, large tree native to southern New South Wales and Victoria, that is similar to Eucalyptus viminalis.
Some records include: 11 years - 75 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot; 30 years - 113 feet with a trunk diameter of 20 inches; largest on record - 150 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
The sickle-shaped leaves, up to 8 x 0.5 inches, are dark green.
The small white flowers are borne in heads of up to 7.
The bark is smooth on the upper branches and trunk, fibrous and gray-brown on the lower trunk.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 ( tolerating as low as 8 F ) requiring 30 to 68 inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers uniform rainfall throughout the year though it is tolerant of temporary drought. Thrives in New Zealand.

Eucalyptus spathulata ( Swamp Mallet )
A fast growing, low branched, dense small tree reaching a maximum size of 40 x 27 feet that is native to far southwest Australia. It is valuable as a windbreak in dry climates.
The narrow leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are gray-green.
The profuse creamy-white flowers borne winter and spring, open from red buds.
The smooth red-brown bark turns to gray before it sheds during late summer.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 15 F. Very tolerant of salt and clay as well as wet soil.
A new variety has red flowers.

Eucalyptus stellulata ( Black Sally )
A fast growing, dense, thick crowned, rounded shade tree native to high mountains of southeastern Australia. Some records include: 5 years - 20 feet; 35 years - 72 feet with a trunk diameter of 22 inches; largest on record - 72 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.3 feet.
The leathery leaves, up to 6 x 1 inches, are blue-green to dull green.
The small white flowers are borne in clusters autumn into the following spring.
The bark on the upper trunk and limbs is smooth and olive green, with the bark close to the base being rough and dark.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 ( tolerating as low as 5 F with hardiest seed source possibly hardy to -1 F ). Requires cool summers and grows as far north as British Columbia on the Pacific Coast. Flood tolerant.

'Mitchellii'
Tolerates as low as -1 F

Eucalyptus stoatei ( Scarlet Pear Gum )
A small tree reaching a maximum size of 33 x 27 feet that is native to Western Australia. It is frequently planted as a small street tree in southern Australia.
The leaves are up to 3 inches in length
The scarlet-red, solitary, pendulous flower buds up to 2 inches in length, open to reveal showy yellow stamens from spring into autumn.
Showy red fruits that later turn brown follow.
The bark is light brown and smooth.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 requiring 14+ inches of average yearly rainfall.
Extremely tolerant of heat and drought as well as saline soil and lime.

Eucalyptus stricklandii ( Strickland's Gum )
A fast growing, dense, fairly upright, medium-sized tree reaching a maximum size of 40 x 27 feet that is native to Western Australia. It is an excellent small shade tree for dry climates.
The thick, leathery leaves, up to 5 x 1 inches, are glossy bright green.
The profuse, showy, bright yellow flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, borne during summmer, open from powdery white buds.
The bark is smooth and cinnamon except very close to the base where it is roughly furrowed and dark brown.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( tolerating as low as 15 F ) requiring 9+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Tolerant of heat, drought, salt, lime and clay.
It can be grown in the mildest southwesterly parts of the British Isles.

Eucalyptus stricta ( Blue Mountains Mallee )
An attractive, moderate growing, multi-stemmed large shrub to small tree, reaching a maximum size of 23 x 15 feet that is native to the Blue Mountains near Sydney where it is common.
The erect, lance-shaped leaves are up to 4 inches in length.
The abundant, very showy, white flowers are borne summer into autumn.
The bark is smooth and white.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 tolerating as low as 5 F. Prefers sandy soil.

Eucalyptus subcrenulata ( Tasmanian Yellow Gum )
An attractive, fast growing, large tree, closely related to Eucalyptus johnstonii, that is native to Tasmania. Some records include: 5 years - 13 feet; 32 years - 113 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet; 51 years - trunk diameter of 2.5 feet; 96 years - trunk diameter of 5 feet; largest on record - 180 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
The leaves, up to 5 inches in length, are deep green. The adult leaves are lance-shaped and pendulous.
The flowers are creamy-white.
The beautiful bark peels in vertical strips revealing green, pale brown and yellow.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 ( tolerating as low as -2 F ). Prefers moist soil.

Eucalyptus tenuiramis
A small tree reaching around 30 feet.
Some records include: largest on record - 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 inches .

Eucalyptus tereticornis ( Forest Red Gum )
A very fast growing, stately large tree native to New Guinea and the east coast of Australia.
Some records include: 7 years - 150 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot; largest on record - 170 x 80 feet with a trunk diameter of 8 feet.
Long-lived, it can live up to 350 years or more.
The narrow, curved leaves, up to 10 x 4 inches, are glossy green.
The profuse white flowers are borne winter and spring.
The bark sheds in large sheets leaving fresh bark of white, blue-gray and cream beneath.
Hardy zones 8 to 12 requiring 20 to 60 inches of average yearly rainfall.
Extremely heat and drought tolerant. Moderately salt tolerant. It thrives in the southeastern U.S. as far north as Savannah, GA.

Eucalyptus tetragona ( Tallerack )
A small open tree reaching a maximum height of 25 feet that is a widespread native of soutern Western Australia.
The attractive, thick, short pointed, broad oval leaves, up to 6 inches in length are bright gray-green and are often used in floral arrangments.
The white flowers, up to 1.3 inches, are borne during spring and summer.
The stems are square and covered in a white powdery bloom.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 requiring 16 + inches of average yearly rainfall. Very tolerant of drought as well as coastal conditions.

Eucalyptus tetraptera ( Four-Winged Gum )
A straggly, moderate growing, mallee shrub reaching a maximum height of 12 feet that is a widespread native to the southern coast of Western Australia. It can be trained as an attractive miniature tree in cultivation.
The leathery leaves, up to 8 x 3 inches, are glossy bright green.
The red flowers with pink stamens are borne single during spring.
The contorted trunks are covered in smooth white to gray bark.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 requiring 16 + inches of average yearly rainfall.

Eucalyptus torquata ( Coral Gum )
A fast growing, popular, rounded to spreading, pendulous, small ornamental tree native to Western Australia. Some records include: 5 years - 8 feet; 20 years - 33 x 20 feet; largest on record - 40 x 40 feet.
The "juvenile" leaves, up to 2.3 x 1.3 inches, are blue-green.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 7 x 1.5 inches are medium green.
The profuse red flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are borne spring and summer ( or almost all year in some gardens ) and open from buds that are red.
The stems are red.
The gray bark is smooth on the upper stems and rough on the lower trunk.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 17 F requiring 8 to 21 inches of average yearly rainfall. Extremely tolerant of both heat and drought.

Eucalyptus triflora ( Pigeon House Eucalyptus )
A medium size tree native to Pigeon House Mountain in Australia where it is endangered. Some records include: largest on record - 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 14 inches.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 5 x 1 inches, are glossy green.
The flowers are creamy-white.
The bark is smooth and white.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 tolerating as low as 5 F

Eucalyptus urnigera ( Urn Gum )
A fast growing, broadly columnar, large tree with drooping branches, that is native to Tasmania. Some records include: 4 years - 40 x 10 feet; 20 years - 90 x 15 feet; 100 years - 120 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet; largest on record - 150 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet; largest in Ireland - 105 feet.
The rounded "juvenile" leaves, on young trees, are up to 2 inches and bluish-white.
The ovate "adult" leaves, up to 6 x 2 inches, are glossy blue-green on both sides.
The axilliary flower clusters borne in late summer and fall contain 3 creamy-white flowers.
The smooth creamy-white bark peels vertically in long strips.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 tolerating as low as 5 F and possibly even -4 F for hardiest seed source. Thrives in much of the British Isles and should be much more widely planted in North America. Tolerates flooding and wet soils.

Eucalyptus vernicosa ( Varnished Gum )
A slow growing ( < 12 inches ), large shrub to small tree, reaching a maximum height of 15 feet, that is native to high mountains in Tasmania. It is related to Eucalyptus subcrenulata. The very attractive, pointed, broad-ovate leaves are glossy deep green.
Hardy zones 7b to 9 ( tolerating 0 F ) but requiring a cool maritime climate to thrive.

Eucalyptus viminalis ( Manna Gum )
A very fast growing, massive, spreading forest tree reaching around 200 feet with pendulous willow-like branches , that is native to eastern Australia.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 9 feet; 5 years - 30 feet; 20 years - 150 x 40 feet; largest on record - 320 x 82 feet with a trunk diameter of 10 feet; largest in Ireland - 143 feet.
The narrow, lance-shaped leaves, up to 8 x 1 inches, are deep green.
The leaves of this Eucalyptus are adored by the Koalas.
The white flowers are small but are borne profusely during summer.
The darkish bark sheds in long ribbons to reveal smooth fresh white bark.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 tolerating as low as 5 F requiring 24 to 60 inches of average yearly rainfall. Prefers cool climates but thrives in parts of the southeastern U.S. including northern Florida.

Eucalyptus viridis ( Green Mallee )
A moderate growing, multi-stemmed mallee tree reaching a maximum size of 40 x 40 feet, that is native to semi-area parts of southeastern Australia.
The narrow, lance-shaped leaves are deep green.
The profuse small white flowers are borne late spring and summer.
The bark on the upper stems is smooth and white, the bark on the lower trunk is fibrous.
Hardy zones 8 to 11

Eucalyptus wandoo ( Wandoo )
A medium to large size tree native to semi-arid parts of Western Australia.
Some records include: largest on record - 100 x 66 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet. It is an excellent shade tree where it is adapted.
The narrow, lance-shaped leaves, up to 6 x 1.5 inches, are dull green.
The creamy-white flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are borne late spring into autumn. The flowers are very rich in nectar and are valuable in the production of honey.
The very attractive bark is smooth and white.
The valuable timber is durable and very strong.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 requiring 20 to 40 inches of average yearly rainfall.
Extremely heat and drought tolerant.

Eucalyptus willisii ( Grampians Shining Peppermint )
A very attractive small tree, reaching up to 40 feet, that is native to Victoria in southeastern Australia. Some records include: 17 years - 37 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 inches. This close relative of Eucalyptus nitida has glossy green foliage and smooth bark.
Hardy zones 8b to 9 ( tolerating as low as 10 F ).

Eucalyptus woodwardii ( Lemon-Flowered Gum )
A very attractive upright small tree native to a small area outside of Kalgoorlie in Western Australia. Some records include: 2 years - 6 feet; largest on record - 50 x 27 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 6 x 1.5 inches, are silvery to pale grayish-green.
The attractive bright yellow flowers borne in clusters up to 2 inches across are borne winter and spring.
The bark is smooth and white.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 17 F requiring 10+ inches of average yearly rainfall. It prefers sandy loam and a hot Mediterranean climate.

Related Trees

Corymbia
A genus of close to 100 species of trees that were formerly included in the Eucalyptus genus which is very similar. Most prefer acidic, sandy loam soil and are easy to germinate from seed.





Corymbia aparrerinja ( Central Australian Ghose Gum )
A broad rounded tree that is a widespread native to dry regions of Australia.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; largest on record - 82 x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.5 feet.
The drooping leaves, up to 10 x 4 inches, are glossy green.
The beautiful bark is intense white and smooth.
The creamy-white flowers are small.
Hardy zones 9b to 12 tolerating as low as 22 F requiring 10+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Requires a warm to hot climate and is tolerant of severe drought.

Corymbia calophylla ( Marri )
A fast growing, highly attractive, dense, rounded large tree native to the southern part of Western Australia.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; largest on record - 200 x 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 feet.
The leaves, up to 8 x 4 inches, are reddish-brown at first turning to green.
The creamy-white or less often pink flowers are borne in large clusters during summer.
Hardy zones 8 to 10. Requires moist, well drained soil as well as hot summers.

Corymbia citriodora ( Lemon-Scented Gum )
A very graceful, straight trunked, open crowned tall tree native to tropical parts of Queensland in Australia. Among the worlds fastest growing trees, it has been planted for forestry and landscape in many mild regions throughout the world.
Some records include: 2 years - 17 feet; 4 years - 43 feet; 4.5 years - 52 feet; 20 years - 100 x 27 feet; largest on record - 170 x 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
The strong lemon-scented, long leaves, up to 12 x 2.5 inches, are deep green.
The white flowers are borne summer into fall.
The smooth bark is powdery-white to pink.
Hardy zones 9 to 12. Lemon-Scented Gum thrives on most well drained soils.

Corymbia eximia ( Yellow Bloodwood )
A fast growing, medium size tree native to coastal parts of eastern Australia.
Some records include: largest on record - feet with a trunk diameter of feet.
The curved, narrow leaves, up to 8 x 1 inches, are blue-green.
The nectar rich, large, creamy-white flowers are borne profusely during spring.
The scaly bark is yellowish-brown.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 requiring 24+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Yellow Bloodwood is very tolerant of drought however young trees are more susceptible to cold.

Corymbia ficifolia ( Red-Flowered Gum )
Among the most beautiful of all flowering trees, it is native to a small moist area of southern Western Australia but has been planted in mild regions around the world.
The Red-Flowered Gum is typically moderate growing and short trunked topped by a dense, rounded crown.
Some records include: 5 years - 20 feet; 20 years - 30 x 25 feet; largest on record - 65 x 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
The thick, wide lance-shaped leaves are up to 7 x 2 inches, are glossy deep green.
The profuse showy scarlet-red flowers are borne in large clusters at the branch tips during summer.
They are followed by urn-shaped fruits, up to 1.5 inches.
The bark is rough and red-brown to gray.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 tolerating as low as 19 F requiring 40+ inches of average yearly rainfall. Tolerant of seashore conditions.

Corymbia gummifera ( Red Bloodwood )
A large heavy crowned tree native to eastern Australia.
Some records include: 10 years - 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 8 inches; 18 years - 92 feet with a trunk diameter of 14 inches; largest on record - 200 feet with a trunk diameter of 14 feet. It makes an excellent shade tree.
The "adult" leaves, up to 9 x 3 inches, are deep green.
The flower clusters contain up to 7 creamy-white flowers.
The checkered bark is gray-brown.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 requiring 28 to 80 inches of average yearly rainfall.

Corymbia maculata ( Spotted Gum )
A highly ornamental, tall tree native to coastal parts of eastern Australia.
Some records include: 3 years - 37 feet; 10 years - 105 feet; 40 years - 164 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet; largest on record - 233 x 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 11 feet.
The narrow leaves, up to 12 x 4.5 inches, are deep green.
The fragrant white flowers are borne in small clusters during fall and winter.
The smooth trunk is cream, pale gray or pink. The bark sheds in patches giving it a mottled appearance. The timber is highly valued.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 requiring 30 to 75 inches of average yearly rainfall.

Corymbia papuana ( Ghost Gum )
A fast growing tree native to New Guinea.
Some records include: largest on record - 80 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet.
The leaves are large, up to 10 x 4 inches.
The small white flowers are borne during winter.
The bark on upper branches is smooth and white, square patterned on the lower trunk.
Hardy zones 10 to 12 in tropical climates only. Shade tolerant.

Corymbia ptychocarpa ( Swamp Bloodwood )
A moderate growing, broad canopied tree native to the northern Australian tropics.
Some records include: largest on record - feet with a trunk diameter of feet.
The very large, broad lance-shaped leaves, up to 18 x 6 inches, are glossy deep green.
The huge flower clusters, up to 16 inches across, are borne on and off throughout the year. The flowers vary in color from deep red, orange-red to pink and white.
Hardy zones 9 to 12 requiring 20+ inches of average yearly rainfall, requiring hot wet summers. Clay tolerant.

Corymbia tessellaris ( Moreton Bay Ash )
A large tree of New Guinea and northern parts of eastern Australia.
Some records include: largest on record - 120 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 6.6 feet.
The pendulous, narrow leaves, up to 10 x 2 inches
The showy white flowers are borne spring and summer.
The bark on the upper trunk and limbs is smooth and white; square pattern dark gray on the lower half.
Hardy zones 10 to 12. Requires tropical and warm temperate climates.

Corymbia torelliana ( Cadaga )
A very fast growing, straight trunked dense tree native to moist forests in the tropical northern part of Queensland.
Some records include: largest on record - 120 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet.
The leaves, up to 9 inches in length, are glossy bright green.
The white flowers are borne profusely produced during spring. They are rich in nectar.
The upper trunk and limbs has smooth whitish-green bark. The bark on the lower trunk is dark gray.
Hardy zones 10 to 12 tolerating as low as F requiring 40 to 80 inches of average yearly rainfall, preferably with most of it during summer. Cadaga prefers deep well drained soil and is very heat tolerant.

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