Wednesday, January 20, 2010

Rosa

Rosa ( the Roses ) are a very diverse genus of flowering shrubs and are among of the longest cultivated plants in human history
The fruits are extremely rich in Vitamin C and when dried can be added to cakes and cereals. Vitamin C content is much higher in fresh fruit. It is important to remove the seeds and any irritating hairs from the Rose hips before eating. The Rose hips make an excellent tea, which a single cup may contain 6 oranges worth of Vitamn C. After making the first cup of tea, re-use the same hips as many times as necessary until the tea becomes too weak to use.
Most Roses prefer full sun on well drained soil. Propagation is done from hardwood cuttings taken during early summer for cultivars or from seed sown immediately or stratified for 3 months at 40 F.Many Roses can also be propagated from hardwood cuttings taken during late winter.
Non irrigated wild Roses rarely get leaf diseases. Most are drought tolerant.
Roses that do get leaf funguses can be treated safely with mixtures of baking soda and water. It is reported that Powdery Mildew and Black Spot is less prevalent when Alliums are used as companion plants for Roses. Black Spot can be treated by removing badly infected leaves then mixing a few drops of liquid soap and 2 teaspoons of baking soda with 1 gallon of ater then spraying the entire plant with this mixture every 5 days until the black spot disappears.
Many of the more complicated Rose Hybrids, esp. the Hybrid Tea, Floribundas,
Grandiflora, Polyantha and Miniature Roses are excluded due to lack of space for covered. There are many books on the market devoted to Roses only.


* photos taken on May 16 2010 @ Cylburn Arboretum, Baltimore, MD



* photo taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photo taken on Sep 8 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 21 2011 @ Brookside Gardens "Party with the Peonies" tour in Fulton, MD

* photos taken on May 14 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken by J.E. Broaddus @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photos taken on June 2 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 21 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Oct 9 2017 in Columbia, MD


SPECIES ROSES

Rosa acicularis ( Arctic Rose )
Also called Prickly Wild Rose. A somewhat lax shrub native to northern Eurasia & North America ( from northern Alaska to far northwestern Northwest Territories to southern Nunavut to far northern Ontario to Quebec to New Brunswick; south to Idaho to New Mexico to South Dakota to Michigan to Grand Bend, Ontario to Long Point, Ontario to Connecticut ). Some records include: largest on record - 10 x 17 ( rarely over 5 ) feet.
It is the provincial flower of Alberta, Canada where it thrives in cold winter and dry summers. It is found on forest edges, meadows, river bottoms and sandy shores in the wild.
The pinnate leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are composed of 3 to 7 toothed, ovate leaflets, up to 2.5 x 1 inches in size. The foliage is grayish-green.
The fragrant, single, rosy-pink, flowers, up to 2.5 inches across, are borne during early summer.
They are followed by bright red, pear-shaped rose-hips which are an important source of food for wildlife.
The reddish-brown stems are densely bristly.
Hardy zones 1 to 6 in full sun to partial shade. It is very drought tolerant and often returns from the roots after fire. A wood boring insect called Rose Stem Girdler has caused severe population declines in central Canada.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photos taken on July 17 2016 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo taken by Dr. Nick V. Kurzenko @ CalPhotos

Rosa amblyotis
An upright shrub native to Kamchatka. Some records include: largest on record - 6 x 4 feet.
The pinnate leaves are composed of gray-green leaflets, up to 2 inches.
The slightly fragrant, single, red flowers, up to 2 inches across are borne during June.
They are followed by pear-shaped to rounded, red rose-hips.
Hardy zones 2 to 9

Rosa arkansana ( Prairie Rose )
A rapid growing, erect, suckering shrub native to prairies in the central U.S. from ( from far north-central British Columbia to Dawson Creek, Alberta to Edmonton, Alberta to Saskatoon, Saskatchewan to Sioux Lookout, Ontario to Thunder Bay, Ontario to Michigan's Upper Peninsula; south to southern New Mexico to northern Texas to southern Missouri to southern Michigan...a separate population is known from Nova Scotia ). It is endangered in the wild in Ontario. Some records include: largest on record - 4 x 8 feet.
The pinnate leaves, up to 6.5 inches long, are composed of 7 to 11 toothed, ovate leaflets, up to 2.5 x 0.8 inches in size. The glossy bright green foliage turns to intense orange-red during autumn.
The slightly fragrant, single, reddish-pink flowers, up to 1.5 inches, are borne in clusters, continuing over a long season during early to mid summer.
They are followed by round, red rose-hips, up to 0.5 inches across. They are great for making teas and jellies.
The stems are very bristly.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 ( likely 2 for Saskatchewan seed source ), even thriving in parts of Alaska.

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


Rosa banksiana ( Banksia Rose )
An extremely vigorous semi-evergreen Rose native to western and central China, that is nearly evergreen in mild climates. Some records include: 5 years - 20 x 10 feet; largest on record - 50+ x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.5 feet. It can live up to 150 years or more.
The pinnate leaves are composed of 3 to 5 ( rarely 7 ) leaflets, up to 2.5 inches in length. The foliage is glossy deep green.
The fragrant, very abundant, small, white flowers, up to 2 inches, are borne in massed clusters, during mid to late spring.
This Rose does not bear thorns.
Hardy zones 7 to 10 tolerating as low as -5 F. It can be pruned to be kept more compact. It is resistant to black spot but mildew can be a problem in some areas. It is very tolerant of dry climates.

'Lutea'
A very popular form with double yellow flowers.
The green stems do not have prickles.

* photos taken on Apr 16 2015 in Elkridge, MD

* photo taken on Aug 24 2017 @ U.S. Botanic Garden, Wash. DC.


Rosa beggeriana ( Beggar Rose )
A medium-size shrub, reaching up to 10 x 8 feet, that is native to central Asia ( ( Afghanistan & Kazakhstan, far southwest Mongolia & northwest China ).
The pinnate leaves, are composed of up to 9 or 11 elliptical leaflets, up to 1.3 x 0.5 inches in size. The foliage is gray-green.
The abundant, white flowers, up to 2 inches wide, are borne in stem tip clusters of 8 or more, over an extended period during summer.
They are followed by small, round, red rose-hips, up to 0.2 inches across.
The pruplish-brown stems are armed with sickle-shaped, large thorns.
Hardy zones 3 to 8. very cold resistant.

Rosa blanda ( Meadow Rose )
Also called Hudson Bay Rose. It is an erect medium-size shrub native to North America ( from southeast Saskatchewan to Sioux Lookout, Ontario to Lansdowne House, Ontario to Attawapiskat, Ontario to Matagami, Quebec to New Brunswick and Nova Scotia; south to central Kansas to southern Illinois to southern Ohio to New Jersey ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant on the Lake Erie islands as well as the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It was also common at Detroit, Michigan during that time. It can be aggressive and often forms dense thickets in the wild. Some records include: largest on record - 7 x 12 feet. It is similar in appearance to Rosa canina and makes a great natural hedge. It is found on rocky or sandy shores, meadows and open woodland in the wild.
The pinnate leaves, up to 4.5 inches long, are composed of 5 to 7 elliptic leaflets, up to 2.5 x 1.2 inches in size. The foliage is dull green.
The slightly fragrant, single, dark pink flowers, up to 3 inches wide, are borne during early summer. It will bloom even after winters going below -40 F.
They are followed by ovoid, scarlet-red rose-hips, up to 0.5 inches, persisting over a long season.
The brown stems are nearly spineless.
Hardy zones 2 to 7 ( even thriving in most of Alaska ) in full sun to partial shade.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photos taken on July 14 2016 in Tobermory, ON

* photos taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


Rosa bracteata ( Macartney Rose )
A vigorous spreading evergreen climbing Rose that is native to China but is now found wild in much of the southern U.S. Some records include: largest on record - 30 x 20 feet.
The pinnate leaves are composed of 7 to 11 toothed, obovate to rounded leaflets, up to 2 x 1 inches. The foliage is glossy deep green.
The lightly-fragrant, white ( with showy yellow stamens ), single flowers, up to 6 inches across, are borne continuously from early summer to mid-autumn.
They are followed by rounded, orange-red rose-hips, up to 1.5 inches across.
The stems are armed viciously with hooked thorns.
Hardy zones 7 to 10. Tough and disease resistant.

Rosa californica ( California Rose )
A fast growing, arching, spreading, thicket forming, rhizomatous, medium-sized, deciduous shrub native to the western U.S. ( west of the Sierra Nevadas from northwest Oregon to as far south as the Baja Peninsula ).
Some records include: 10 years - 8 x 6.5 feet; largest on record - 10 x 10 feet.
The fern-like pinnate leaves, are composed of 5 to 7 toothed leaflets, up to 1.5 inches. The blue-green foliage turns to yellow in autumn.
The lightly fragrant, single, pink flowers, up to 2 inches wide, are borne in clusters during summer.
They are followed by rounded, orange-red rose-hips, up to 0.7 inches wide, which are edible after the first fall frost. The rose-hips are rich in Vitamin C.
The stems are armed with stout prickles.
Hardy zones 5 to 10 in partial shade, even tolerating shade. It requires as little as 20 inches of average yearly precipitation and is tolerant of both flooding and drought. Cut older plants nearly to ground during late autumn to renovate.

'Mermaid'
Hardy north to zone 4.

* photo taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos


'Plena'
Identical to Rosa californica except with semi-double flowers.

Rosa canina ( Dog Rose )
A vigorous suckering shrub, averaging around 7 feet, that is native to the British Isles, Europe and southwest Asia, though now also found wild in North America.
Some records include: largest on record - 18 x 10 feet. The canes can grow up to 11.5 feet in a single season. The older canes can be up to 2 inches in diameter.
The pinnate leaves, up to inches in length, are composed of 5 to 7 toothed, ovate leaflets, up to 2 x 0.8 ( rarely over 1.5 ) inches in size. The foliage is glossy mid-green above, pale green beneath.
The showy fragrant, single, pale pink ( sometimes white ) flowers, up to 3.2 ( rarely over 2 ) inches across, are borne in clusters of 1 to 4 during early summer.
They are followed by orange-red rose-hips, up to 1.3 inches in length.
The stems are armed with brown or gray, curved prickles, up to 0.5 inches in length.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 in full sun on well drained soil. It is very drought tolerant.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


'Abbotswood'
Double pink flowers.

Rosa carolina ( Carolina Rose )
A rhizomatous small shrub native to upland woods in the eastern U.S. ( from eastern Minnesota to far northern Wisconsin to Sault Ste Marie to Chalk River, Ontario to Quebec to Nova Scotia; south to eastern Texas to northern Florida ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant along the Detroit River, around Leamington and Point Pelee, the Lake Erie islands as well as the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It was also abundant at Detroit during that time. It often spreads underground, forming dense thickets. Some records include: largest on record - 6 x 7 feet. It is found on dry sandy roadsides and woodland edge and meadows in the wild.
The pinnate leaves, up to 6.5 ( rarely over 4 ) inches in length, are composed of 5 to 7 toothed, oval leaflets, up to 2 x 1.1 inches. The foliage is luxuriant mid-green above, bright green below.
The single, bright pink flowers are up to 2.5 inches across, are borne during early summer.
They are followed by edible, red rose-hips, up to 0.5 inches long, that ripen late summer, often persisting into early spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 ( hardiness varies with seed source ) in sun to partial shade on well drained soil. Drought and urban tolerant.

* photos taken on Aug 25 2013 @ University of Maryland, College Park

* photos taken on Sep 18 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD

* historic archive photo


'Alba'
White flowers.

'Walter's Strain'
Hardy north to zone 2, tolerating as low as -40 F

Rosa chinensis ( China Rose )
Varying from a small shrub to almost a climber, this semi-evergreen Rose is native to China. Some records include: largest on record - 20 x 15 feet
The pinnate leaves, up to inches in length, are composed of 5 leaflets, up to 2.5 inches.
The single to semi-double, white, pink or red flowers, up to 2 inches, are borne in clusters, all summer long.
They are followed by orange to scarlet-red, pear-shaped rose-hips
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on just about any moist, well drained soil. Rarely bothered by disease problems.

* historical archive photo


Rosa chionistra ( Chionistra Rose )
An upright shrub, reaching up to 8 feet in height, that is native to Cyprus where it is very rare.
The pure white flowers are borne during spring.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 in full sun on fertile, very well drained soil.

Rosa cinnamomea plena ( Cinnamon Rose )
Also called Rosa majalis. A medium-size shrub native from central Europe to Siberia. Some records include: largest on record - 6.6 x 6 feet
The pinnate leaves are composed of 7 leaflets, up to 0.5 inches. The foliage is gray-green.
The purplish-pink, single to double flowers, up to 2 inches, are borne in clusters, during early summer.
They are followed by deep-red, oblong rose-hips. The edible Rose hips are very high in Vitamin C.
The stems are slender and purplish.
Hardy zones 3 to 7

* photo of unknown internet source



Rosa x damascana ( Damask Rose )
A hybrid between Rosa gallica & R. moschata. A moderate growing, medium-sized shrub Rose. Some records include: largest on record - 10 x 12 feet.
The pinnate leaves are composed of 5 to 7 leaflets, each up to 2.5 inches in length.
The double flowers, up to 3 inches wide, are light pink to light red. They are borne early to mid summer.
The stems are profusely armed with stiff bristles and stout, curved prickles.
Hardy zones 5 +

Rosa davidii ( Father David's Rose )
A large arching shrub native to western and central China. Some records include: largest on record - 13 x 12 feet.
The pinnate leaves, up to 8 inches in length, are composed of 9 to 11 leaflets, up to 2 inches in length. The somewhat wrinkled foliage is deep green.
The lightly fragrant, soft pink flowers, up to 2 inches, are borne in large clusters during summer.
They are followed by abundant, showy, orange rose-hips, up to 1 inch in length, borne on hanging clusters during autumn.
The stems are armed with scattered reddish prickles.
Hardy zones 5 to 8.

Rosa davurica ( Dahurian Rose )
A small to medium size shrub native to to northeast Asia ( from northeast Mongolia & eastern Siberia; south to northeastern China, Korea and Japan ).. Some records include: largest on record - 6 x 4 feet.
The small pinnate leaves are composed of 7 to 9 ovate leaflets, up to 1.6 x 0.6 inches in size. The foliage is glossy mid-green.
The purplish-pink flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne in clusters of 1 to 3, during early summer.
They are followed by red, oval rose-hips, up to 0.6 inches wide, during late summer into early autumn.
The purplish-brown stems are armed with straight prickles.
Hardy zones 2 to 6. Shade tolerant.

* photos taken by Dr. Nick V. Kurzenko @ CalPhotos


Rosa dumalis ( Glaucous Dog Rose )
A medium-size shrub native from Europe into southwest Asia and also Turkey. Some records include: largest on record - 6.6 feet. It is very similar to Rosa canina except for having darker pink flowers.
The pinnate leaves are composed of 7 leaflets, up to 1.5 inches in length. The foliage is bluish-green.
The single, bright to dark pink flowers are borne during summer.
They are followed by bristly or smooth red rose-hips, up to an inch in length.
The stems are covered in white bloom and long bent thorns.
Hardy zones 4 to 9

Rosa ecae
A dense, suckering, small shrub native to rocky hillside in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Some records include: 10 years - 5 x 4 feet; largest on record - 7 x 4 feet.
The aromatic, fine fern-like pinnate leaves are composed of up to 9 obovate leaflets, up to 0.3 inches.
The prolific, rich deep yellow flowers, up to 1.3 inches, are borne during spring.
They are followed by glossy, red-brown rose-hips
The stems are very prickly.
Hardy zones 4 to 9.

Rosa farreri
Also called Rosa elegantula. It is a suckering dense, medium size shrub native to northwest China. Some records include: 10 years - 6.5 x 10 feet; largest on record - 8 x 10 feet.
The fern-like pinnate leaves are composed of up to 11 ovate leaflets, up to 1 inch in length.
The attractive ferny foliage is gray-green turning intense purple and deep red in autumn.
The abundant, single, white to rosey-pink flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are borne during summer.
They are followed by profuse orange-red rose-hips, up to 0.5 inches.
The stems are densely covered with red bristles.
Hardy zones 6 to 10

Rosa fedtschenkoana
A vigorous, suckering, upright shrub native to mountains in central Asia; south to Afghanistan, Mongolia and northern China. Some records include: 10 years - 8 x 6 feet ( average ); largest on record - 20 x 8 feet.
The pinnate leaves, are composed of 5 to 9 , ovate, elliptical or rounded leaflets, up to 1.5 inches in length.
The foliage is blue-green, turning to purple during autumn.
The lightly fragrant, single, white flowers, up to 3.5 inches wide, are borne throughout summer then often repeating into autumn.
They are followed by lightly bristly, orange-red rose-hips, up to 2 inches in length.
The stems are armed with prickles that are pinkish when young.
Hardy zones 4 to 10

* photo of unknown internet source


Rosa filipes
An extremely vigorous, massive deciduous climbing Rose that is native to western China. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 12 feet; largest on record - 50 x 60 feet ( with climbing support ). Climbing support such as an open tall tree, open fence, shed or sturdy arbor is required.
The pinnate leaves, up to 5.5 inches in length, are composed of 5 to 7 leaflets, up to 3.5 x 2 inches in size. The foliage turns to orange and red during autumn.
The white flowers, up to 1 inch wide, are borne in dense, huge, foot wide clusters of up to 100.
They are followed by very abundant, showy, red, oval rose-hips, up to 0.6 inches wide, during autumn.
Hardy zones 5 to 8.

'Kiftsgate'
HUGE flower clusters, up to 18 inches across.

Rosa foetida ( Austrian Copper Briar )
An erect to arching, medium-size shrub native to the foothills of the Caucasus Mountains in western Asia though widely grown elsewhere. Some records include: largest on record - 10 x 10 feet.
The pinnate leaves are composed of 9 leaflets, up to 1.7 inches in length. The foliage is bright green.
The scented single, deep yellow flowers, up to 3.2 inches across, are borne during summer.
They are followed by rounded, bristly, red rose-hips.
The stems are armed with large black thorns.
Hardy zones 3 to 6, thriving even in south-central and southeast Alaska. It is unfortunately very prone to leaf diseases such as Black Spot.

* photo of unknown internet source


'Bicolor'
Brilliant coppery-orange blooms.

'Harrison's Yellow'
Also Rosa x harisonii. A hybrid with R. spinosissima, upright in habit, reaching up to 6.5 feet.
The foliage is glossy bright green.
The lightly fragrant, bright yellow flowers are borne during late spring.

'Persian Yellow'
Flowers are double and yellow.

Rosa foliolosa ( White Prairie Rose )
A suckering, thornless, small deciduous shrub that is native to the south-central U.S. ( southeast Kansas, most of Oklahoma, central Texas and western Arkansas ). Some records include: largest on record - 4 x 4 feet. It is found on prairie on dry openly wooded hillsides.
The pinnate leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are composed of 5 to 11 ( averaging 9 ) narrow leaflets, up to 2 x 0.3 inches in size. The foliage is glossy deep green above, bright green beneath.
The lightly-fragrant, single, white ( rarely bright pink ) flowers, up to 2.5 inches, are borne over a long period during summer.
They are followed by small, rounded, scarlet-red rose-hips up to 0.4 x 0.3 inches in size.
The stems are only sparsely thorned.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on well drained soil. Flood and heat tolerant and has excellent disease resistance.

* historic archive photo


Rosa gallica ( French Rose )
A suckering, low shrub that is a widespread native to central and southern Europe. Some records include: largest on record - 7 x 5 feet.
The pinnate leaves, up to inches in length, are composed of 7 rounded leaflets, up to 3.5 inches long. The attractive leathery foliage is deep green.
The lightly fragrant, single, light to deep pink ( with showy yellow stamens ) flowers, up to 2.5 inches, are borne during summer.
They are followed by orange-red rose-hips
The stems are lightly bristled.
Hardy zones 3 to 8. Resistant to leaf spot.

* historic archive photo


'Officinalis'
A very attractive bush that is somewhat smaller in size, with larger, very fragrant, semi-double, deep red flowers.

'Versicolor'
A clone originating from 'Officinalis' that is the same except for the flowers being striped white, pink and deep red.

* photos taken on Aug 1 2013 in Stratford, Ontario


Rosa gigantea
A massive climbing semi-evergreen Rose native from northeast India to Yunnan Province in China and northern Burma. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 20 feet with a trunk diameter increase of 1 inch; largest on record - 8o feet with a trunk diameter of 20 inches.
The pinnate leaves, up to 10 inches in length, are composed of 7 leaflets, up to 3.5 x 1.5 inches. The thick leaflets are powdery-blue beneath.
The creamy-white flowers are up to 5.5 inches across, the largest of any Rose.
They are followed by orange rose-hips, up to 1.5 inches in length, often persisting into the following spring.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 tolerating as low as 5 F.

Rosa glauca ( Sweet Briar Rose )
Also called Rosa rubiginosa, Rosa eglanteria, Rosa glauca and Redleaf Rose. A non-suckering, tough, rapid growing, large, broad, arching, deciduous shrub native to mountains of central and southern Europe and western Asia. It is now also growing wild in parts of North America ( especially Newfoundland, New Brunswick & Nova Scotia ). During the early 1900s, it was became abundant on the sandy soils at Point Pelee near Leamington, Ontario. Some records include: largest on record - 14 x 12 feet. Older canes can be up to 1.2 inches in diameter. It has become invasive thus being declared a weed in southeastern Australia as well as New Zealand.
The apple-scented pinnate leaves, up to 5.5 ( rarely over 4 ) inches in length, are composed of 7 to 9 toothed, oblong to rounded leaflets, up to 2 x 1 ( rarely over 1.3 ) inches in size. The attractive foliage is smoky-purple at first, turning to blue-gray; turning to orangish-yellow during autumn.
The very fragrant, single, deep pink fading to white in the middle, small flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne in clusters of 2 to 5 during late spring into early summer.
They are followed by attractive, abundant, orange-red to purplish-red, ovoid rose-hips, up to 0.8 x 0.5 inches in size, that persist well into winter. The showy berries are often in clusters of 12 or so. The fruit is used in Chile to produce Marmalades.
The thorned, yellowish-green stems are sparsly brstled, the thorns up to 0.6 inches in length.
It is similar in many ways to Rosa canina except for having more prickly foliage.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 ( even in interior Alaska ) in full sun to partial shade on just about any well drained soil. Very alkaline, drought, heat, urban and soil tolerant. It is highly black spot resistant. It can be cut back hard during late fall through early spring and will regenerate vigorously from old wood.

* photos taken on Aug 1 2013 in Stratford, Ontario

* photo taken on July 17 2016 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo taken on Jul 18 2017 @ Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, ON

* photos taken on Jul 19 2017 @ Rideau Hall, Ottawa, ON


'Amy Robsart'
Profuse blooming with single, very fragrant, dark pink blooms.

'Lady Penzance'
Very fragrant, single, orange-pink flowers with showy yellow stamens.

'Lord Penzance'
Fragrant, single yellow flowers.

'Magnifica'
A dense shrub with semi-double deep red flowers. Can be used as a hedge.

'Manning's Blush'
Dense with large, double flowers that are white with a pink tinge.

'Meg Merrilies'
A very vigorous shrub with fragrant, semi-double, intense deep red flowers that are followed by a showy display of red rose-hips.
The stems are very prickly.

Rosa gymnocarpa ( Bald-Hip Rose )
A fast growing, rhizome spreading, erect, small shrub, reaching up to 5 ( rarely over 3 ) feet, that is native to western North America ( from British Columbia to western Montana; south to central California to southeast Idaho ). The rhizomes often survive forest fires and resprout after. It is found in open woodland understory in the wild.
The pinnate leaves are composed of 5 to 9 toothed, oval leaflets, up to 1 x 0.5 inches in size. The foliage turns to red during autumn.
The small pink flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are borne in clusters of 1 to 4.
They are followed by small, scarlet-red hips, up to 0.4 inches wide, that persist through the winter.
The stems are covered in tiny bristles but not thorns.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in partial shade on moist, alkaline, well drained soil.

* photo taken by http://www.nwplants.com


Rosa helenae
A very vigorous, climbing Rose that is native to central China. Some records include: largest on record - 30 x 20 feet.
The pinnate leaves, up to 7 inches in length, are composed of 9 narrow ovate leaflets, up to 2.5 inches. The foliage is bright green above, pale beneath.
The single, very fragrant, creamy-white flowers, up to 1.5 inches, are borne in clusters, up to 6 inches wide.
They are followed by very showy, orange to scarlet-red rose-hips, up to 0.6 inches, borne on large hanging clusters. The fruits will usually persist until late winter.
The young stems are purplish and the stems are profusely armed with strong curved spines.
Hardy zones 5 to 9

Rosa inodora ( Scentless Rose )
Also called Rosa elliptica. A fast growing, coarse, medium-size shrub native to southern Europe. Some records include: largest on record - 8 x 10 feet. It is closely related to Rosa eglanteria but the leaflets are elliptic rather than rounded.
The scentless, single, whitish-pink to soft-pink flowers are borne in clusters, during summer.
They are followed by scarlet-red, oval rose-hips
Hardy zones 4 to 8

Rosa laevigata ( Cherokee Rose )
A very vigorous, semi-evergreen to evergreen large climbing Rose that is native to southern China and southeast Asia but now also grows wild in the southern U.S.
Some records include: largest on record - 33 x 20 feet.
The trifoliate leaves are composed of 3 to 5 toothed, ovate leaflets, up to 4 inches in length. The thick leathery foliage is glossy deep green. The midrib on the underside of the leaf sometimes has the occasional thorn.
The large single, fragrant, pure white flowers, up to 4 inches, are borne in clusters, during late spring into early summer.
They are followed by showy, bristly, orangish-red rose-hips, up to 1.6 x 0.7 inches in size.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on just about any well drained soil.

* photo of unknown internet source

* historical archive photos


Rosa laxa
A medium-sized, deciduous shrub, reaching a maximum size of 6.5 feet, that is native from central Siberia; south to central Asia to southwest Mongolia to Xinjiang Province in China.
The leaves are composed of 7 to 9 oblong or elliptical leaflets, up to 0.8 inches wide. The foliage is luxuriant deep green.
The white or pink flowers, up to 1.2 inches wide, are borne in clusters of 3 to 6 during mid-summer.
They are followed by red, oblong hips up to 0.7 inches wide.
The stems are armed with axilliary prickles.
Hardy zones 1 to 6.

Rosa x macrantha
A vigorous, arching to spreading medium size shrub.
Some records include: largest on record - 7 x 10 feet.
The pinnate leaves, up to inches in length, are composed of 5 to 7 leaflets, up to 2 inches.
The single, large, fragrant, clear pink fading to white flowers, up to 3 inches, are borne during summer.
They are followed by rose-hips
Hardy zones 6 to 10

Rosa macrophylla 'Master Hugh'
A large deciduous shrub, reaching up to 15 feet or more.
The single flowers are soft pink.
They are followed by scarlet-red, very large rose-hips.

Rosa marretii
A small upright shrub, reaching a maximum size of 6 x 4 feet, that is native to Sakhalin in far northeastern Asia.
The pinnate leaves are composed of up to 9 leaflets, up to 1 inch in length. The foliage is mid green.
The pink flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne in small clusters during summer.
They are followed by rounded, red rose-hips
The stems are purplish.
Hardy zones 2 to 6.

Rosa maximowicziana
A fast growing, deciduous shrub, reaching up to 15 x 10 feet, that is native to far eastern Russia; south to northeast China and Korea. It is similar to Rosa multiflora but for colder climates.
The pinnate leaves, up to 4.5 inches long, are composed of 7 to 9 ovate or oblong leaflets. The foliage is deep green.
The white or very pale pink flowers, up to 1.5 inches wide, are borne in small corymbs during early summer. The flowers appear 2 weeks later than Rose multiflora.
They are followed by glossy red, later turning blackish-brown, oval fruits, up to 0.4 inches long.
Hardy zones 3 to 6.

* photos taken by Dr. Nick V. Kurzenko @ CalPhotos


Rosa moschata ( Musk Rose )
A vigorous arching to semi-climbing rose, averaging 7 feet in height, that is native from southern Europe to the Middle East. Some records include: largest on record - 4o feet ( vining )
The pinnate leaves, up to inches in length, are composed of 7 to 13 elliptical leaflets, up to 3 inches. The foliage is glossy gray-green.
The fragrant, single, white flowers, up to 2.3 inches, are borne in loose clusters, during mid to late summer though some may bloom from early summer to as late as mid-autumn.
They are followed by ovoid, downy, orange-red rose-hips, up to 0.6 inches.
The stems are only sparsely thorned.
Hardy zones 6 to 10 ( 5 and possibly even 4 on very protected sites such as a court yard or south facing wall ). Musk Roses are rarely bothered by the typical Rose diseases of rust, black spot or powdery mildew. Musk Roses grown on their own roots are more cold hardy than grafted plants as if severe freeze damage did occur, they can grow back from the roots. Even if cold hardiness isn't a problem, grafted Musk Roses may throw suckers from an unknown root stock that may eventually take over the plant. Musk Roses are NOT cut back during early spring in the way Hybrid T Roses are. The only pruning is pruning out overly dense growths and dead brances.

* photo of unknown internet source


'Buff Beauty'
Bright orange, double flowers.

'Felicia'
Moderate growing and compact, reaching up to 4 x 4 feet in 5 years, eventually 5.5 feet at most.
The fragrant flowers are double, pale pink.

'Francesca'
Fragrant, yellow, semi-double flowers.

'Moonlight'
Fragrant, semi-double, white flowers.

'Mozart'
Vigorous growing, dense and thorny, reaching up to 5 x 8 feet in just 5 years.
The single, pink ( with deep reddish-pink edges and white center ) flowers are borne on large clusters from early summer until mid-autumn.
Stunning in appearance, it is unfortunately not fragrant.
If not deadheaded, the flowers will be replaced with orange rose-hips.

'Prosperity'
Reaches up to 6 x 6 feet, with deep green foliage contrasting spectacular, fragrant, double white flowers.

'Red Ballerina'
Deep red, single flowers.

'Vanity'
A vigorous, dense rounded to spreading shrub, reaching up to 5 x 8 feet in just 5 years, eventually up to 7 x 12 feet.
The large, intense deep pink flowers are borne on clusters.

Rosa moyesii
A vigorous shrub, native to northwestern China and reaching up to 13 feet. Some records include: largest on record - 18 x 13 feet
The pinnate leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are composed of up to 13 leaflets, up to 1.5 inches long. The foliage is deep green.
The single, intense deep red flowers, up to 2.5 inches wide, are borne in clusters during summer.
They are followed by showy, hanging, orange-red, bottle-shaped rose-hips, up to 2.5 inches in length, persisting into January. The Rose hips are very high in Vitamin C.
The stems are thick and upright, with scattered thorns.
Hardy zones 4 to 7 in full sun.

'Eddies Jewel'
Added ornamental effect due to its repeat blooming.

'Geranium'
Nearly thornless and vigorous but compact in habit, reaching a maximum size of only 10 x 8 ( rarely over 6 x 6 ) feet. Some records include: 3 years - 8 feet.
The deep red flowers, up to 3 inches across, are followed by abundant, very large, showy orange-red rose hips.

'Highdown'
Very similar except for larger intense-red flowers, up to 3.2 inches across, that are followed by very large, orange-red Rose-hips.

'Rosea'
Similar to Rosa moyesii except with pink flowers borne in clusters, that are followed by very large Rose-hips, up to 3.2 inches in length.

Rosa multibracteata
A vigorous arching shrub native to Sichuan and Yunnan Provinces in western China. Some records include: largest on record - 13 feet ( often over 10 feet in 10 years ).
The fern-like pinnate leaves, up to 0.6 inches in length, are composed of 5 to 9 toothed, ovate leaflets, up to 6 inches.
The profuse lilac-pink, non-double flowers, up to 1.5 inches, are borne in terminal clusters over an extended from late spring to mid summer.
They are followed by lightly bristly, red rose-hips, up to 0.6 inches.
The stems have abundant thorns.
Hardy zones 6 to 9. Very tolerant of drought but does not enjoy the hot humid summers in the eastern U.S. This Rose prefers the Pacific Northwest even including areas east of the Cascades if not too hot. Rarely bothered by pests or disease.
Propagation: collect the seeds when the Rose-hips are red. Acid scarify them to soften the seed coats then cold treat for 3 months.
Softwood cuttings are easily rooted with mist in a peaty perlite mix.

Rosa multiflora ( Multiflora Rose )
a beautiful but noxious weed that is a very vigorous shrub native to Japan and eastern Asia, where it should stay! DO NOT PLANT in the eastern U.S.
Some records include: largest on record - 23 x 14 feet.
The pinnate leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are composed of 7 to 11 leaflets, up to 2 inches in length.
The abundant, non-double, white flowers, up to 1.3 inches wide, are borne in clusters, over a short period during early summer.
They are followed by round, red rose-hips, up to 0.3 inches wide.
Hardy zones 5 to 10 in full sun to partial shade.

* photo taken on May 16 2010 @ Cylburn Arboretum, Baltimore, MD

* photo taken on May 21 2011 in Howard County, MD

* photo taken on May 20 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo of Multiflora Rose invasion taken Apr 22 2015 in Ellicott City, MD

* photos taken on July 15 2016 in Lions Head, ON


'Carnea'
White to light pink, fully double flowers.

'Cathayensis'
A natural clone found in China with larger, rosy-pink, non-double flowers, up to 1.7 inches across.

'Inermis'
Thornless

'Platyphylla'
Longer leaves, up to 10 inches.

Rosa nitida ( Shining Rose )
A fast growing, low suckering shrub native to bogs and black spruce swamps in northeastern North America ( from Wawa, Ontario to Cochrane, Ontario to Newfoundland; south to New York State to Connecticut ). Some records include: largest on record - 3.5 x 4 feet. It is endangered in New York State, Vermont and Connecticut. It may be used for groundcover, especially on commercial sites.
The pinnate leaves, up to 4 inches long, are composed of 7 to 9 elliptical leaflets, up to 1.5 x 0.7 inches in size. The fern-like foliage is glossy very deep green, turning intense deep red during autumn.
The fragrant, single, deep pink flowers, up to 2.5 inches, are borne in clusters, during summer.
They are followed by showy, slightly bristly, rounded, deep red rose-hips, up to 0.3 inches, borne during summer.
The stems are slender and prickly.
Hardy zones 2 to 7, thriving even in interior Alaska. It is both drought and flood tolerant. It is also tolerant of urban conditions.

* photo taken on Jul 18 2017 @ Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, ON

* photos taken on Jul 19 2017 @ Rideau Hall, Ottawa, ON

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Rosa nutkatana ( Nootka Rose )
A fast growing, upright Rose, native to western North America ( from Bethel, Alaska to Anchorage, Alaska to Atlin, British Columbia to Mackenzie, B.C. to western Montana; south to northern California to southern Utah to central New Mexico ). Some records include: largest on record - 10 x 7 feet.
The pinnate leaves, up to 7 inches in length, are composed of 5 to 9 toothed, elliptical leaflets, up to 2 x 1.6 inches in size. The foliage is deep gray-green, turning to orange and red during autumn.
The fragrant, non-double, deep pink ( with yellow stamens ) flowers, up to 3.5 inches wide, are borne in clusters of 1 to 3 during early summer.
They are followed by scarlet-red, rounded rose-hips, up to an inch in size.
The purplish-brown stems are only sparsely thorned.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 thriving where average yearly precip exceeds 32 inches. Tolerant of flooding, clay, sand and shade.

* photo taken by http://www.nwplants.com

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photo


'Plena'
Gray-green foliage contrasts with fragrant, semi-double deep pink flowers.

Rosa odorata 'Mutabilis'
A fast growing, medium size shrub reaching a maximum size of 10 x 8 ( rarely over 5 ) feet. Some records include: largest on record - 20 feet ( on a very protected site ).
The semi-evergreen to evergreen foliage is reddish at first, turning to blue-green.
The lightly fragrant, single flowers, up to 3 inches wide, open bright apricot-yellow and deepen to deep pink. The flowers are borne profusely from late spring until autumn frosts.
Hardy zone 7 to 9 ( 6 on protected sites ) in full sun to partial shade on acidic soil ( foliage may turn yellowish on alkaline soils ). Easy to grow and very tough, being tolerant of drought and extreme heat. Prune during early spring. It is east to root from cuttings.

* photo taken on May 8 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photo taken @ Smithsonian Inst, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


Rosa palustris ( Swamp Rose )
A suckering, erect, medium-size shrub, native to swamps and marshland in eastern North America ( from eastern Minnesota to Batchewana, Ontario to Mattawa, Ontario to Nova Scotia; south to central Arkansas to central Mississippi to central Florida ). Some records include: largest on record - 10 x 8 feet
The pinnate leaves, up to 4.5 inches in length, are composed of up to 7 ( rarely 5 or 9 ) elliptical leaflets, up to 2.5 x 0.7 inches in size. The foliage is dull deep green above, bright green beneath.
The fragrant, non-double, pink flowers, up to 2.2 inches wide, are borne in small clusters over a long period during early to mid summer.
They are followed by glossy red rose-hips, up to 0.4 inches, during mid to late summer, often persisting into early spring. The fruits are edible.
The stems are reddish.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 and is flood tolerant, even thriving in swampy conditions. Not prone to mildew.

* photo taken by Robert H. Mohlenbrock @ USDA SCS. 1989. Midwest wetland flora

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database. Wetland flora

* photos taken on June 27 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD

* historic archive photo


Rosa pendulina
A fast growing, arching, medium-size shrub native to central and southern Europe. Some records include: largest on record - 10 x 5 feet
The pinnate leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are composed of up to 11 leaflets, up to 2.5 inches in length. The foliage is deep green.
The dark to purplish-pink flowers ( with showy yellow stamens ), up to inches, are borne in clusters, during summer.
They are followed by hanging, red rose-hips, up to 1.3 inches in length.
The red-purple stems are very sparsely thorned.
Hardy zones 4 to 9, it thrives in the Ottawa Valley of Canada but is generally unknown in North America.

* photo taken on Jul 19 2017 @ Rideau Hall, Ottawa, ON


Rosa pimpinellifolia ( Scots Rose )
Also called Rosa spinosissima. A dense small suckering shrub that is a widespread European native ( it ranged from far northern Africa all the way to Iceland and Norway ). Some records include: largest on record - 8 x 7 ( rarely over 4 in height ) feet.
Due to its suckering, a single plant may eventually cover a large area, well beyond 7 feet. It can be used as a tall groundcover on slopes and sand dunes.
The ferny pinnate leaves, up to inches in length, are composed of 5 to 11 leaflets, up to 1 x 0.7 inches in size. The glossy bright green foliage turns to orange and red during autumn.
The abundant, fragrant, creamy-white single flowers, up to 2.5 inches across, are borne during late spring to early summer.
They are followed by rounded, shiny black rose-hips, up to 0.6 inches in length, during late summer.
The stems are very prickly with red spines.
Hardy zones 3 to 8, thriving even in interior Alaska. Tolerant of pure sand, clay, drought, wind, urban, seashore and limestone conditions. It is disease resistant and very easy to grow.

* photos taken on Jul 19 2017 @ Rideau Hall, Ottawa, ON

* historic archive photos


var 'Altaica'
Also called Rosa oxyacantha. Reaches up to 6.5 feet with pure white flowers with showy yellow stamens.
This subspecies is native from Mongolia to Siberia; south to Xinjiang Province in northwest China. It may be even hardier than the species...to zone 2.

'Double White'
Very fragrant double white flowers.

'Dunwich Rose'
Single, light yellow flowers.

'Falkland'
Semi-double flowers that are lilac-pink, later fading to white.

'Fruhlingsgold'
Large single flowers that are golden-yellow fading to light yellow.

'Fruhlingsmorgan'
A large shrub with large, single flowers that are dark pink later fading to white and light yellow. The flowers have showy yellow stamens.

'Karl Forster'
Repeat flowering with double creamy-white flowers with showy yellow stamens.

'Single Cherry'
Thorny stems. The flowers are single dark red with showy bright yellow stamens.

'Stanwell Perpetual'
An arching shrub with gray-green foliage. The very fragrant, double, light pink flowers are borne over a long season.

'William III'
Semi-double, deep red flowers.

Rosa pisocarpa ( Cluster Rose )
A gracefully, arching, dense, small to medium-size shrub native to western North America ( from Vancouver Island to Whistler, British Columbia; south to northern California to northern Idaho ). Some records include: largest on record - 10 x 8 feet. It is often found on river floodplains in the wild. It is great for use in soil stabilization of river banks and erosion control.
The pinnate leaves are composed of 5 to 9 coarsely-toothed, elliptical leaflets, up to 1.5 inches in length. The foliage is glossy bright green.
The rosy-pink, single flowers, up to 1.3 inches across, are borne clusters of 3 to 10 during early summer, often repeating sporadically during early autumn.
They are followed by small, oblong, glossy, scarlet-red rose-hips, up to 0.5 inches.
The reddish-purple to black stems are slender with bristles on the lower parts of the shrub. The stems are armed with vicious thorns that are paired at the leaf axils.
Hardy zones 6 to 10. Tolerant of shade and even grows on moist shady sites in the wild.

* photo taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos

* photo taken by http://www.nwplants.com


Rosa platyacantha
An erect shrub, reaching up to 6.5 ( rarely over 3.3 ) feet in height, that is native to central Asia ( Kazakhstan, Mongolia and western China ).
The pinnate leaves are composed of 5 to 9 oblong or obovate leaflets, up to 0.6 x 0.4 inches in size. The leathery foliage is bright green.
The yellow, single flowers are up to 2 inches across.
They are followed by rounded fruits, up to 0.4 inches wide, that ripen to deep red then later to blackish-purple.
The stems are armed with curved or straight, broad-based, yellow thorns that are up to 0.3 inches in length.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 ( 4 on protected sites ) in full sun. It is very cold tolerant.

Rosa primula ( Afghan Yellow Rose )
An erect medium-size shrub native from Turkey to China. Some records include: largest on record - 10 x 5 feet.
The fern-like pinnate leaves- are composed of up to leaflets, up to inches in length. The glaucous blue-green foliage smells like incense.
The abundant, very fragrant, single, light yellow flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne during late spring.
They are followed by smooth, round, deep red rose-hips, up to 0.6 inches across.
The brown stems are armed with thick, red thorns.
Hardy zones 5 to 9

Rosa roxburghii ( Chestnut Rose )
Also called Chinquapin Rose. A sturdy, arching, rounded, large shrub native to western China. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 7 feet; largest on record - 20 x 11 feet.
The ferny pinnate leaves are composed of 7 to 19 toothed, elliptical leaflets, up to 1 inch in length. The foliage is bright green.
The single, fragrant, pink flowers, up to 3 inches across, are borne over a long period during early to mid summer.
They are followed by yellow-green to bright yellow rose-hips covered in short prickles. The rose hips are very large, up to 2 x 3 inches in size. The abundant fruits often persist late into fall.
The older stems have attractively shredded peeling brown bark, the younger stems are angular.
Hardy zones 4 to 9. Highly disease resistant and tolerant of hot humid summers.

* photo taken on Sep 3 2017 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


'Plena'
Double, rose-pink flowers.

Rosa rubus ( Blackberry Rose )
A very vigorous, semi-climbing, large shrub native to western and central China.
Some records include: largest on record - 30 feet ( with support ).
The pinnate leaves, up to 9 inches in length, are composed of up to 3 or 5 leaflets, up to 4 inches in length. The foliage is purplish at first, turning to glossy green.
The single, white flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are borne in dense clusters during summer.
They are followed by abundant, deep red rose-hips, up to 0.6 inches.
The purplish-green stems are armed with thorns.
Hardy zones 8 to 10

Rosa rugosa ( Rugosa Rose )
Also called Beach Rose. A rapid growing, dense medium size shrub native to eastern Asia ( eastern Russia; south to northern China, Korea and Japan ). It has become endangered in China while now also found in the wild in North America and the British Isles. The Rugosa Roses do not need alot of pruning and make excellent hedges. Some records include: 10 years - 7 x 9 feet; largest on record - 12 x 20 ( rarely over 7 ) feet with a trunk of 4 inch diameter.
The pinnate leaves, up to inches in 6 length, are composed of 5 to 9 elliptical leaflets, up to 2 x 1 inches in size. The healthy wrinkled, leathery foliage is glossy deep green, turning to orange and red during autumn.
The very fragrant, single, light to deep pink flowers, up to 4 inches wide, are borne during summer into fall. With ideal conditions, they may bloom continuously from May into October.
They are followed by large, rounded, vivid-red rose-hips up to 1 inch in length.
The thick stems are thorny.
Hardy zones 1 to 7 in full sun on just about any well drained soil however preferring sands. Extremely tough and hardy; the Rugosa Rose is tolerant of heat, drought, salt, saline soil, sand, wind, ice, fire and hail. It thrives on the harsh northern Great Plains. Rugosa Roses are not usually bothered by typical Rose diseases such as mildew and black spot. Spraying with insecticides and fungicides should be avoided as the Rugosa foliage can be chemical sensitive and turn yellow. It is an excellent plant for commercial sites including parking lot plantings as well as use on ocean shore developments. If you purchase plants that are budded rather than grown from cuttings...plant the graft union 3 inches below ground to encourage that it will eventually grow on their own roots ( which can take up to 3 years ).

* photo taken on May 21 2011 in Howard County, MD

* photo taken on Aug 3 2012 in London, Ontario

* photos taken on Aug 1 2013 in Stratford, Ontario

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database. North Dakota tree handbook

* photos taken on May 25 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Nov 28 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos

* photos taken on Jul 18 2017 @ Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, ON

* photo taken by Dr. Nick V. Kurzenko @ CalPhotos


'Alba'
A vigorous, medium-size shrub reaching a maximum size of 10 x 6 feet.
The foliage is glossy bright green.
The pink buds open to fragrant, single, large white flowers.
They are followed by large, red rose-hips.

* photos taken on Jul 17 2017 in Gatineau, Quebec


'Blanc Double de Coubert'
Attractive, dense, rounded in habit, reaching up to 7 x 5 feet in 10 years with very fragrant semi-double, white flowers.
The foliage is deep green.

* photo taken on May 14 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 10 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Jul 19 2017 @ Major's Hill Park, Ottawa, ON


'Conrad'
Reaches up to 7 x 5 feet in 10 years with fragrant, double, silver-pink flowers, up to 3.5 inches across.

'Frau Dagmar Hastrup'
Dense and compact in habit, reaching up to 5 x 5 feet; it is great for hedging.
The very fragrant, single, light pink flowers are followed by very large, red Rose hips.

* photos taken on May 6 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 25 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 8 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 21 2017 in Columbia, MD


'Hansa'
Reaches up to 10 x 7 ( rarely over 8 ) feet with lush mildew resistant deep green foliage that turns to orange during autumn.
The very fragrant, double flowers are magenta-red.
They are followed by abundant, large rose hips.
The stems are very thorny.
Exceptionally drought tolerant and thrives on dry sandy soil.

* photo taken on May 16 2010 @ Cylburn Arboretum, Baltimore, MD

* photo taken on May 6 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 17 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 25 2014 in Columbia, MD


'Jens Munk'
A vigorous, bushy shrub reaching up to 6.5 x 5 feet ( 3.5 x 6.5 feet in 7 years ) with lush deep green foliage that is free of Black-Spot and Mildew.
The very fragrant, soft pink, semi-double flowers, up to 3 inches across, are borne early summer into autumn.
It thrives especially well in harsh climates including Edmonton, Alberta and The Pas, Manitoba.

* photos taken on May 17 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Jul 19 2017 @ Major's Hill Park, Ottawa, ON


'Jubilee'
Originating in Russia, with attractive purple-red flowers.
The large striking red fruits are VERY HIGH IN VITAMIN C.

'Roseraie D'Hay'
Vigorous and dense, reaching up to 8 x 8 feet with fragrant, double, deep red to purplish-pink flowers, up to 4 inches across. The flowers appear over a long season.

* photos taken on Aug 1 2013 in Stratford, Ontario

* photos taken on Jul 17 2017 in Gatineau, Quebec

* photos taken on Jul 19 2017 @ Major's Hill Park, Ottawa, ON

* photo taken on Jul 19 2017 @ Rideau Hall, Ottawa, ON


'Rubra'
Reaches up to 10 x 6 feet.
Hardy north to zone 2

'Sarah'
Also called 'Sarah Van Fleet'. Reaches up to 8 x 5 feet in 10 years with double mid-pink flowers, up to 4 inches across.
There is often a good repeat bloom later in the season.
It does not produce rose hips.

'Snow Owl'
Mildew resistant foliage.

'Therese Bugnet'
A strong growing, upright shrub reaching up to 6 feet with lush, mildew resistant foliage. The fragrant, double flowers are red, later fading to pink.

Rosa sempervirens ( Evergreen Rose )
A semi-evergreen scrambling or trailing shrub native to southern Europe that can be low growing without support for its stems which can reach a length up to 35 feet though usually much less.
The pinnate leaves, up to inches in length, are composed of up to 7 leaflets, up to 2.5 inches in length. The foliage is deep green.
The fragrant, white flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne in clusters over a long period during early summer.
They are followed by small, orange-red rose-hips, up to inches.
Hardy zones 7 to 10

Rosa sericea ( Maltese Cross Rose )
Also called Rose omeiensis. It is a vigorous erect large shrub native to western China. Some records include: largest on record - 20 x 15 feet.
The pinnate leaves, up to inches in length, are composed of up to 11 leaflets, up to 1.3 inches in length. The foliage is .
The single, 4-petalled ( rare for Roses ) white flowers, up to 2.5 inches across, are borne during spring.
They are followed by bright-red, Pear-shaped rose-hips, up to 0.6 inches.
The thick stems are armed with large, flat hooked thorns, up to 0.75 x 0.5 inches in size, are red and translucent when young.
Hardy zones 4 to 9. Tolerant of seashore and urban conditions. Resistant to mildew and black spot.

* photo of unknown internet source


subsp 'omeiensis'
The leaves have more leaflets ( up to 19 ) turning red in autumn. The wedge-shaped thorns are large, up to 1.5 inches in length.
It is often cut back to 1.5 feet in height, during early spring to encourage the vigorous upright first year stems that bear the showy red thorns.

Rosa setigera ( Prairie Rose )
A very fast growing, massive, arching shrub to climbing Rose that is native to floodplain open woods and ditches in North America ( from southeast Nebraska to to central Iowa to southern Wisconsin to southern Ontario to central New York State; south to eastern Texas to central Georgia ). It is endangered in Canada, Nebraska, Iowa, Wisconsin, Maryland, Virginia and North Carolina. In Ontario, Canada it is known from Essex, Kent, Lambton and Middlesex Counties east to near Strathroy. It was also known from south of Belleville, Ontario before 1941. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was locally abundant at the Ojibway Prairie in Windsor, along Lake St Clair, near Amherstburg, the Lake Erie islands as well as the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It was very abundant at Detroit during that time. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 15 feet; largest on record - 20 x 12 feet in size ( climbing shoots supported on tree in Amherstburg, ON ). This Rose often forms thickets covering large areas.
The pinnate leaves are composed of 3 to 5 oval leaflets, up to 4 inches in length. The foliage is glossy mid-green.
The single, dark pink flowers, up to 3 inches across, are borne in dense clusters, over a long period during summer. The fragrant flowers are pink.
They are followed by round, bristly, green-brown to red rose-hips, up to 0.4 inches wide.
The very long, arching stems are armed with scattered thorns.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on just about any moist soil. Cut old canes to the ground to enhance vigor.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photo


Rosa setipoda
A medium-size shrub native to western China. Some records include: largest on record - 10 x 9 feet.
The pinnate leaves, up to 9 inches in length, are composed of up to 9 ovate leaflets, up to 3.5 inches in length. The foliage is aromatic when crushed.
The single, light pink ( with prominent yellow stamens ) flowers, up to 2.5 inches across, are borne in large clusters during summer.
They are followed by showy, bristly deep red rose-hips, up to 2 inches.
The thick stems are armed with thick thorns.
Hardy zones 6 to 9

Rosa sherardii
A dense small shrub native to north and central Europe. Some records include: largest on record - 7 x 6 feet.
The pinnate leaves, up to inches in length, are composed of 3 to 7 elliptical leaflets, up to inches in length. The hairy foliage is blue-green.
The lightly fragrant, single dark pink flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne in clusters during spring.
They are followed by urn-shaped, scarlet-red rose-hips, up to 0.8 inches in length.
Hardy zones 4 to 9

Rosa souliena
An extremely vigorous, semi-climbing shrub native to western China. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 12 feet; largest on record - 13 x 12 feet.
The pinnate leaves, up to inches in length, are composed of up to 9 oval leaflets, up to 1.3 inches in length. The foliage is grayish-green.
The single, white flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are borne in dense clusters, up to 6 inches across, during summer.
They are followed by ovoid, orange-red rose-hips, up to 0.5 inches across.
The stems are arching to climbing.
Hardy zones 7 to 10

Rosa spithamea ( Coastal Ground Rose )
A low-growing shrub, reaching up to 3 x 3 feet, that is native from western Oregon to central California. It is great as an understory plant for open woodland.
The pinnate leaves are composed of toothed, ovate to rounded leaflets.
The fragrant flowers, up to 1 inch wide, are deep rosy-pink.
They are followed by bright orange-red rose-hips.
The stems are prickly.
Hardy zones 7 to 10 partial shade. Requires 28 + inches of rainfall per year. Cut canes back during winter to encourage more vigorous growth.

Rosa stellata ( Desert Rose )
A dense small shrub native to the southwest U.S. ( New Mexico & southern Texas ) that can form thickets. Some records include: largest on record - 4.5 x 3 feet.
The pinnate leaves, up to inches in length, are composed of 3 to 5 very small, wedge-shaped leaflets, up to 0.7 inches in length. The foliage is lightly hairy and bright green.
The single, mid-pink flowers, up to 2.5 inches across, are borne over a long season beginning mid summer.
They are followed by soft spiny, red rose-hips, up to 0.8 inches.
The stems are spiny.
Hardy zones 6 to 10

'Mirifica'
Larger in size, reaching up to 7 feet. The flowers are deep pink to purplish-red.

Rosa sweginzowii
An upright to spreading, large shrub native to north and western China. Some records include: largest on record - 17 x 15 feet.
The pinnate leaves are composed of up to 11 heavily-toothed, elliptical leaflets, up to 2 inches in length. The foliage is bright green at first, turning to medium-green.
The deep pink flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne in small clusters during mid-summer.
They are followed by narrow pear shaped, orange-red rose-hips, up to 1 inch in lenght.
The reddish stems are armed with thorns and densely covered in bristles.
Hardy zones 5 to 9

'Macrocarpa'
Abundant, larger Rose-hips.

Rosa tomentosa ( Downy Rose )
An arching medium size shrub native to Europe and Turkey. Some records include: largest on record - 10 feet.
The pinnate leaves, up to inches in length, are composed of up to 7 elliptic leaflets, up to 1.8 inches in length. The downy foliage is bright-green turning to gray-green. The crushed foliage is aromatic.
The fragrant, single, light pink or white flowers, up to 2.3 inches across, are borne during summer.
They are followed by ovoid, bright-red rose-hips, up to 1 inch in length.
Hardy zones 5 to 9.

Rosa villosa ( Apple Rose )
Also called Rosa pomifera. An attractive, fast growing, dense, stiffly, upright, medium-sized shrub, reaching up to 8 x 7 feet, that is native from central and southern Europe to Turkey and northern Iran. Some records include: 10 years - 6.5 x 6.5 feet. It makes a great specimen, hedge or screen.
The large pinnate leaves are composed of up to 6 to 9 oblong leaflets, up to 2.5 inches in length. The attractive, downy foliage is glaucous gray-green, turning to yellow during autumn.
The fragrant, showy, abundant, single flowers, up to 2.5 inches wide, are deep pink.
The large, bristly fruits are deep red. The Vitamin C rich fruits are great for making jellies.
The rigid, straight branches are sparsely armed with thorns.
Hardy zones 3 to 7.

* photos taken on Jul 17 2017 in Ottawa, ON


'Duplex'
Semi-double blooms on this repeat bloomer.

Rosa virginiana ( Virginia Rose )
A dense, suckering, erect, medium-size shrub native to eastern North America ( from far southeast Iowa to northern Illinois to southern Michigan to southern Quebec to Newfoundland; south to Missouri to mtns. of Virginia to Pennsylvania ). It is extinct in the wild in Missouri, Indiana and Tennessee. It is endangered in Iowa, Illinois, Ohio, Kentucky and North Carolina. Some records include: largest on record - 10 x 20 feet. The older stems can be up to 0.5 inches thick at the base. It is extremely vigorous and even invasive in the Canadian Maritime Provinces. It is found in swamps, wet black spruce woods, grasslands and shorelines in the wild.
The pinnate leaves, up to 5 inches in length, are composed of 7 to 9 ( rarely 5,7 or 11 ), elliptical leaflets, up to 2.5 x 0.6 ( rarely over 1.5 ) inches in size. The foliage is glossy deep green turning to scarlet or deep red during autumn.
The single dark pink ( with showy yellow stamens ) flowers, up to 2.5 inches across, are borne during mid-summer.
They are followed by abundant, showy, round, scarlet-red rose-hips, up to 0.6 inches wide.
The stems are armed with few thorns.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in sun or partial shade. Drought tolerant and typically not prone to disease or pests. Moderately salt and urban tolerant.

* photos taken on Jul 19 2017 @ Rideau Hall, Ottawa, ON

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Rosa webbiana ( Webb's Rose )
A deciduous shrub, reaching up to 6.5 feet in height, that is native to the western Himalayas ( from the Pamir in central Asia; south to Kashmir to Afghanistan ).
The pinnate leaves are composed of toothed obovate leaflets. The foliage is glaucous blue-green.
The single, soft pink flowers, up to 2 inches wide, are borne during early summer.
They are followed by abundant, glossy red, oval to bottle-shaped hips during early to mid autumn.
The reddish stems are armed with slender prickles.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 in full sun.

Rosa wichuraiana ( Memorial Rose )
A very vigorous, semi-evergreen short climbing vine to spreading shrub native to eastern Asia. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 15 feet; largest on record - 10 x 26 feet.
The pinnate leaves are composed of up to 9 leaflets, up to 1 inch in length. The foliage is glossy deep green, turning to red during autumn.
The abundant, fragrant, single, white flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne in loose clusters during summer.
They are followed by small, oval, bright red rose-hips, persist into winter.
The stems are armed with stout thorns.
Hardy zones 5 to 9; it is highly disease resistant and has been used in the breeding of many popular climbing Rose cultivars. Very clay tolerant. Non-supported stems trail on the ground and will often self layer.

* historic archive photos


Rosa willmottiae ( Miss Wilmotts Rose )
A vigorous, upright to arching, massive shrub native to China ( mountains of Gansu, Quinghai, Shaanxi & Sichuan Provinces ). Some records include: largest on record - 13 x 13 ( typically around 10 ) feet.
The handsome, fern-like, pinnate leaves are composed of up to 9 leaflets, up to 0.6 inches in length. The foliage is gray-green to blue-green.
The single, purple-pink ( with showy yellow stamens ) flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are borne throughout most of summer on short lateral shoots.
They are followed by ovoid, orange-red rose-hips, up to 0.7 inches, borne on hanging masses.
Hardy zones 6 to 9. Drought tolerant yet thrives very well in the maritime Pacific Northwest.
Propagation: collect the seeds when the Rose-hips are red. Acid scarify them to soften the seed coats then cold treat for 3 months. Softwood cuttings are easily rooted with mist in a peaty perlite mix.

Rosa woodsii ( Western Wild Rose )
A fast growing, long-lived, stiff, dense, medium-sized, thicket-forming shrub native to open woods and grasslands in western North America ( from Fairbanks, Alaska to central Yukon to Great Slave Lake, Northwest Territories to Dauphin, Manitoba to Quebec; south to southern California to northwest Mexico to northern Texas to central Iowa to northeast Minnesota ). Some records include: largest on record - 10 x 8 feet. It is fast growing and can spread and sucker to form dense colonies. It is great for soil stabilization on dunes and steep slopes. It also makes a beautiful landscape plant.
The pinnate leaves, up to 5 inches long, are composed of 5 to 9 toothed, elliptical or obovate leaflets, up to 2.5 x 1 ( rarely over 1.5 ) inches in size. The glaucous blue-green foliage turns brilliant orange and red in fall.
The very fragrant, single, mid- pink flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne in small clusters during early summer.
They are followed by scarlet-red rose-hips, up to 0.8 x 0.6 inches in size, that persist well into winter and are feasted upon by wildlife.
The very prickly stems are purplish-brown when young.
Hardy zones 1 to 7 in full sun to partial shade. Very drought tolerant but requires 15 + inches of average yearly precip.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos

* photos taken by http://www.nwplants.com


subsp 'ultramontana
Smaller flowers, but otherwise similar on this regional clone from the northwest U.S. and parts of western Canada.

* photo taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos


Rosa xanthina ( Manchu Rose )
A medium-size shrub, reaching a maximum size of 12 x 10 ( rarely over 9 x 8 ) feet in size, that is native to northern China and Korea.
The ferny pinnate leaves are composed of 7 to 13 broadly-oblong leaflets, up to 0.7 x 0.4 inches in size. The foliage is deep green.
The semi-double, golden-yellow flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne during late spring.
They are followed by rounded, reddish-brown rose-hips, up to 0.6 inches across.
The angular branches are dark reddish-purple in color and armed with thorns.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 ( seed source from Heilongjiang & Inner Mongolia probably hardy to zone 2 ) in full sun on just about any well drained soil.

* photos taken on Jul 19 2017 @ Rideau Hall, Ottawa, ON


'Canary Bird'
Reaches up to 10 x 12 feet, with fragrant, single, mid-yellow flowers contrast with deep green foliage.

'Cantrabigi'
Light yellow flowers up to 2.5 inches across. Otherwise similar to Rosa xanthina hugonensis

subsp. hugonensis
Reaches up to 10 x 10 feet with light yellow flowers, up to 2 inches across.

HYBRID ROSES

* photo taken on June 15 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 30 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on June 9 2015 in Columbia, MD


Rosa' Bengal Fire'
A shrub, reaching up to 6 x 6 feet.
The foliage is bronze at first, turning to blue-gray.
The fragrant, single flowers are intense scarlet-red.
The flowers are borne late spring until autumn frost.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 ( tolerating -10 F ) in full sun to partial shade.
Very tough and very resistant to disease including black spot and mildew.

Rosa 'Caramba'
A groundcover rose, reaching up to 2 x 3 feet. The foliage is glossy green and very pest and disease resistant. The bicolor bright orange-red with yellow center flowers are borne late spring into early summer, repeating during the remainder of summer. The very fragrant flowers do not need to be deadheaded as they are self cleaning.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in full sun.

Rosa 'Carpet' ( Carpet Rose )
An excellent disease free groundcover Rose reach a maximum size of 3 x 7 feet.
The Carpet Roses are similar to Drift Roses but are less compact and more spreading with longer canes.

'Peach Carpet'

* photos taken on Nov 11 2010 in Columbia, MD






* photos taken on May 26 2013 in Columbia, MD


'Scarlet Carpet'

* photos taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.




Rosa 'Darlow's Enigma'
A very vigorous, shrubby climbing Rose, reaching up to 10 x 10 ( rarely over 8 ) feet.
The attractive foliage is gray-green.
The very fragrant, single, white flowers are borne over a long season lasting from early summer until autumn frost. The flowers are yellow in bud.
They are followed by attractive, abundant, red rose-hips that persist into winter.
The very thorny, arching canes are red.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 ( 3 & 4 with deep winter mulch ) in full sun or partial shade ( more tolerant of shade than most Roses ). It is very disease resistant as well as tolerant of heat and drought. Prune hard during early spring.

Rosa 'Drift'
A group of bushy, rounded dwarf shrub Roses reaching around 1.5 x 2.5 feet, with very glossy deep green foliage and very abundant flowers produced continuously late spring until autumn frosts.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 ( 4 on protected site or cut back and heavily mulched ), these Roses are rarely bothered by pests of disease. Plants should be planted during spring or fall. It is recommended to cut them back to 6 to 12 inches in height during early spring to encourage vigorous growth and better flowering.

'Apricot Drift'
Double, pale apricot pink flowers.

'Coral Drift'
Profuse intense bright coral-orange flowers. Slightly more prone to mildew than other cultivars.

* photos taken on Sep 15 2011 in Howard Co, MD




'Ice Drift'

* photo taken on May 15 2011 in Columbia, MD


'Peach Drift'
Double, peachy-pink flowers.

* photo taken on Sep 15 2011 in Howard Co, MD

* photos taken on Aug 14 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Oct 14 2015 in Columbia, MD


'Pink Drift'
Larger in size, reaching up to 1.5 x 3 feet, with single, deep pink flowers, up to 1.5 inches across.
The foliage is mid-green.

* photos taken on Aug 3 2011 in Columbia, MD






* photo taken on Oct 12 2011 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Nov 8 2011 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on Oct 6 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on June 1 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Jul 21 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Jun 14 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on June 3 2017 in Columbia, MD


'Red Drift'
Intense red, double flowers, up to 0.7 inches across.

* photos taken on Oct 17 2011 in Columbia, MD



* photo taken on Oct 6 2012 in Howard Co., MD
* photo taken on Sep 2 2014 in Columbia, MD


'Sweet Drift'
Double pale pink flowers

'White Drift' Pure white flowers.

* photo taken on Sep 28 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on June 15 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 31 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on July 25 2016 in Columbia, MD


Rosa 'Homerun'
Reaches up to 4 x 4 feet, with luxuriant glossy deep green foliage and flowers, up to 3 inches across borne late spring until autumn frosts.
Hardy zones 4 to 9, it is highly resistant to both mildew or black spot.


* photo taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.



Rosa 'John Cabot'
A vigorous shrub Rose that may climb with support. It can reach up to 6 x 8 feet in 6 years, eventually reaching as high as 10 feet.
The deep green foliage is free of Black Spot and Mildew.
The fragrant, double, fuchsia-pink to red blooms are borne early summer until autumn frosts.
Hardy at least north to zone 3, it even thrives in Alberta's harsh climate.
Requires full sun.

KNOCKOUT ROSES

Rosa 'Blushing Knockout'
Reaches up to 4 x 4 feet, with blush-pink flowers, up to 3 inches across.
Hardy zones 4b to 8

* photos taken on Sep 15 2011 in Howard Co, MD



Rosa 'Double Knockout'
Similar to 'Knockout', reaching an average size of 4 x 4 feet.
The foliage is deep red at first in spring, turning to gray-green during summer then to deep purple during autumn.
The double flowers, up to 3.5 inches across, are intense cherry-red.

* photo taken on May 16 2011 in Washington, D.C.




* photo taken on Sep 15 2011 in Howard Co, MD

* photos taken on May 4 2012 in Columbia, MD

Rosa 'Knockout'
Among the showiest of all shrub Roses it is also among the easiest to grow. Its very attractive foliage is purplish-red at first turning glossy deep green then to violet and burgundy-red late in autumn.
The reddish-pink flowers, up to 3.5 inches across, are borne from late spring through late autumn.
It is fast growing, reaching a maximum size of 5 x 7.2 ( rarely over 5 x 5 ) feet.
It is resistant to leaf spot and mildew disease. It is also tolerant of heat, drought, humidity and severe cold.
Hardy zones 5 to 7 though will grow in 4 if planted on a protected site with winter snow cover.

* photos taken on April 13 2010 in Howard County, MD



* photo taken on May 5 2010 in Clarksville, MD

* photo taken on August 24 2010 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Sep 15 2011 in Howard Co, MD




* photo taken on Oct 8 2011 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 17 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Oct 19 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 20 2015 in Pikesville, MD

* photos taken on May 24 2017 in Columbia, MD


Rosa 'Pink Double Knockout'
Similar to 'Knockout', except for foliage that is deep red turning to deep blue-green as well as intense coral-pink flowers ( fading to very pale pink ) that are centered yellow. Reaches an average size of 4 x 4 feet. Some records include: 2 years - 3 feet.

* photos taken on Sep 15 2011 in Howard Co, MD


Rosa 'Pink Knockout'
Similar to 'Knockout', reaching an average size of 4 x 4 feet.
The profuse, single flowers are intense mid-pink.

* photos taken on Sep 15 2011 in Howard Co, MD

* photos taken on Oct 12 2011 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on May 14 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 1 2014 in Columbia, MD


Rosa 'Sunny Knockout'
A compact, upright shrub Rose reaching up to 5 x 4 ( rarely over 4 ) feet, with semi-glossy, deep green foliage that turns to deep red during autumn. Some records include: 2 years - 2.8 feet.
The fragrant, single flowers, up to 3 inches across, open bright yellow and fade to creamy-white. The flowers are borne all summer long.
Pests and disease resistant.
Hardy zones 4b to 9

* photo taken on May 15 2011 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Sep 15 2011 in Howard Co, MD

* photos taken on May 14 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 26 2013 in Columbia, MD


'Whiteout'
The white flowering version of the Knockout Rose, bearing profuse, large, 3.5 inch, pure white flowers from spring to autumn frost. The flowers contrast well with the glossy, very deep green foliage.
Hardy zones 4 to 9

* photo taken on May 16 2011 in Washington, D.C.


* photo taken on Sep 15 2011 in Howard Co, MD

* photos taken on Aug 25 2013 @ University of Maryland, College Park


Rosa 'Lydia Rose'
A shrub, reaching up to 6 x 6 feet.
The very fragrant, single, pale pink flowers are borne on cymes from late spring until autumn frosts.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 ( tolerating -10 F ) in full sun to partial shade on consistantly moist, fertile soil. Very disease resistant and more shade tolerant than most Roses.
Prune hard during March.

Rosa 'Morden Series'

'Morden Blush'
Reaches up to 3 x 3 feet, bearing lightly fragrant, creamy-white to pale pink flowers from early summer until autumn frosts.
Hardy zones 2b to 7 in full sun. It is known to survive -50 F with protection of snow only. In zone 2b & 3 it acts more like a perennial than a shrub but will still reliably bloom on current years growth in summer. Moderately prone to leafspot.

'Morden Sunrise'
Reaches up to 5 x 3 feet, bearing lightly fragrant, semi-double flowers, up to 3 inches across, open bright orange and age to yellow. The flowers are borne early summer into autumn if deadheaded.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in full sun. Heat and drought tolerant.

Rosa 'Nearly Wild'
A vigorous, dense, shrubby, spreading Floribunda rose, reaching up to 4 x 5 feet.
The fragrant, single, pink ( with white eye ) flowers, up to 3 inches across, are borne from late spring until autumn frost.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun. Very disease resistant.

Rosa 'Oso Easy Cherry Pie'
Vigorous growing, reaching up to 2 x 5 feet, with glossy deep green foliage that is very disease resistant.
The profuse, single flowers, up to 2 inches across, are scarlet-red with bright yellow centers. The very showy flowers are borne from June to autumn frost.
Hardy zones 3 to 9

Rosa 'Oso Easy Paprika'
Vigorous growing, reaching up to 2 x 5 feet, with glossy deep green foliage that is very disease resistant. Some records include: 3 years - x 4 feet.
The profuse, single flowers, up to 2 inches across, are orange to reddish-orange with bright yellow centers. The flowers are borne from June to autumn frost.
Hardy zones 3 to 9. Very tolerant of heat and humidity, it is highly resistant to both mildew and black spot.

* photo taken on May 21 2011 in Howard County, MD


Rosa 'Radway Sunrise'
A very vigorous shrub, reaching up to 5 x 4 feet.
The foliage is glossy deep green.
The fragrant, single flowers, up to 4 inches across, are orangish-yellow at first, turning to deep pinkish-red.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in full sun on consistantly moist, fertile, well drained soil.
Deadhead for fast reblooom.

Rosa 'The Fairy'
A compact shrub, reaching up to 4 x 4 feet.
The bright pink flowers are up to 2 inches wide.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade.

* photo taken on June 22 2014 in Howard Co., MD


Rosa 'Walking on Sunshine'

* photo taken on June 1 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 24 2017 in Columbia, MD


Rosa 'Yellow Butterfly'
A shrub Rose, very similar to Rosa odoratus 'Mutabilis' but only reaching up to 4 x 3 feet.
The very profuse, single flowers are yellow at first, fading to pinkish-white.
The flowers are borne late spring until autumn frost.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 ( tolerating -10 F )

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