Saturday, January 16, 2010

Crabapples and Apples - The Malus family

All Apples and Crabapples are deciduous spring blooming trees that are distant relatives of the Rose. Most leaf out early in spring and all have rounded fruit in the fall.
All Malus prefer full sun on fertile, well drained soil.
Highly tolerant of urban environments and moderately salt tolerant, even growing in the inner city.
Many Crabapples are prone to Apple Scab which can kill a tree after several repeated attacks. Varieties that are resistant should be used in areas this fungal disease is a problem.
The bark on young trees should be protected with tree wrap in winter as they can easily get girdled by deer and mice.
Young Crabapples should be pruned to a single leader and feathered. Space main limbs for wide crotches to ensure resistance to storms and ice as the tree ages. Remove suckers.
Root suckering on grafted trees can get big time annoying - therefore it is best to grow Malus from cuttings which will prevent this problem. There are many outstanding Malus collections around the world, a few of these include: Scott Arboretum near Philadelphia ( 70 species ), Morton Arboretum near Chicago, Stranahan Arboretum at the University of Toledo, Ohio; Brenton Arboretum in Iowa and the Crabapple Research Grove at the University of Idaho.

* photos taken on family farm April 1959 in Amherstburg, Ontario


* photos from unknown source on internet




* photo taken on April 7 2010 in Columbia, MD









* photo taken on April 5 2010 near Wilkes-Barre, PA


* photos taken on April 11 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum









* photos taken on April 13 2010 in Howard County, MD


Malus x adstringens ( Rosybloom Crabapple )
A large spreading tree that is the hybrid between Malus baccata & Malus pumila. Some records include: largest on record - 40 x 47 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet.
The leaves are soft downy beneath.
The flowers are pinkish.
The short stalked fruits, up to 2 inches are yellow or red.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 and unfortunately very prone to rust, scab and leaf blights often defoliating trees by mid summer.

'Kelsey'
Reaches up to 20 x 27 feet with copper-green foliage. The flowers are deep pink. The fruits are dark purple and persistant.
Hardy north to zone 2

'Nietzwetzkyana' ( Rosybloom Crabapple )
Also called Redvein Crabapple. A medium size tree. Some records include: largest on record - 50 x 47 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet.
The leaves, up to 5 x 2.5 inches, are red at first turning deep green in summer then to purple in autumn.
The large flowers are deep rose-pink.
The deep red, round fruits, are up to 1.5 x 1.5 inches.
The branches and the bark is reddish.
Hardy zone 3 to 9, it is susceptible to scab.

'Selkirk'
Vigorous growing, reaching up to 25 x 25 feet with bronze-green foliage.
The flowers are pink and the fruits are scarlet-red persisting all winter.
Hardy north to zone 2

'Shaughnessy'
Reaches up to 25 x 20 feet with red-green foliage. It is the first in spring to leaf out of all Crabapples and its flowers are fuschia pink.
Hardy north to zone 3

Malus angustifolia ( Southern Crabapple )
A fast growing, short-trunked, stiff-branched, spreading, small to medium sized tree native to the southeast U.S. ( from southeast Missouri to Ohio to Philly, PA; south to Louisiana to Florida ). It occurred sporadically on the Ohio shore during the 1800s. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; largest on record - 60 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.1 feet. A very large tree grows in Chestertown, MD
The elliptical leaves are up to 3 x 2 inches in size. The smooth foliage is shiny mid-green above, smooth lighter green beneath; and persisting late in autumn, often semi-evergreen in mild climates. The foliage usually turns yellow during autumn.
The highly fragrant flowers, up to 2 inches across are rose-pink and borne in clusters of 3 to 5 in mid-spring with the emerging foliage.
The wide rounded fruits, up to 2 inches across are light yellow-green.
The fruits are edible but can be used for jellies or sauces.
The bark is red-brown.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 and very prone to rust. Requires acidic soil and is heat, drought as well as flood tolerant.

* historic archive photos


'Prince'
Glossy foliage turns scarlet-red persisting late in autumn.

Malus x arnoldiana ( Arnold Crabapple )
A small graceful, dense, rounded tree that is the hybrid between Malus baccata & M. floribunda, but appearing more like Malus floribunda, reaching a maximum size of 40 x 40 feet. It is fast growing, up to 3.3 feet per year.
The serrated leaves are up to 4 inches in length.
The fragrant flowers, up to 2 inches across are deep pinkish-red in bud opening to white, borne in clusters of 4 to 6. The small yellow fruits are up to 0.8 inches in width.
Hardy zones 3b to 8 in full sun to partial shade on fertile, well drained soil.

* historic archive photo


Malus x atrosanguinea ( Carmine Crabapple )
A small, spreading tree that is the hybrid between Malus halliana & M. sieboldii. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 20 years - 17 x 20 feet; largest on record - 30 x 34 feet with a trunk diameter of 13 inches. Reported to grow in DC at the Museum of Natural History.
The sharply-toothed, ovate leaves are up to 2 inches in length. The waxy foliage is glossy deep green.
The flowers, up to 1.2 inches wide, are purplish-red.
The fruits, up to 0.6 inches in width, are yellow-green.
Hardy zone 4 to 8. Scab resistant.

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC


Malus baccata ( Siberian Crabapple )
Among the largest of the Crabapples, forming an very dense, erect rounded tree up to 50 feet with spreading branches. It is native to Siberia as well as Kashmir, Nepal, northern & eastern Mongolia, northwestern & north-central China, Manchuria and Japan. Some records include: first year from seed - 24 inches; fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; 20 years - 40 x 40 feet; largest on record - 100 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 4.5 feet; largest in Maine - 40 x 50 x 3.5 feet.
The finely-toothed, taper-pointed, oval leaves are up to 4 x 2 inches in size. The smooth foliage is deep green above, paler green below.
The very fragrant, single flowers, up to 1.5 inches wide, are pink in bud opening to pure white. They are borne in clusters during mid-spring after the foliage has emerged.
The very abundant, scarlet-red fruits, up to 0.5 inches wide, often persist well into the following spring. The fruits are edible but sour.
The gray-brown bark flakes into square plates and reveals red-brown bark beneath.
Hardy zone 2 to 7, even in central Alaska and the northern Great Plains. The Siberian Crabapple is rarely bothered by disease, keeping a canopy of lush healthy foliage long into autumn. The Siberian Crabapple is a very strong wooded and storm resistant.

* photos taken on Oct 22 2013 in Towson, MD

* photos taken on Apr 14 2017 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD

* photo taken on Jul 18 2017 @ Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, ON

* photos taken on Jul 19 2017 @ Rideau Hall, Ottawa, ON

* historic archive photo

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Herman, D.E., et al. 1996. North Dakota tree handbook


'Columnaris'
Reaches up to 23 x 8 feet in 22 years; largest on record - 30 x 21 feet.

* photos taken on July 17 2016 in Blyth, ON


'Jackii'
Very glossy attractive lush green foliage, up to 5 x 2.6 inches in size; and white flowers.
Reaches up to 43 feet in height and 28 inches in trunk diameter in 70 years.
Scab and fireblight resistant.
Hardy north to zone 2

* photo taken on March 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum


'Macrocarpa'
Larger fruits, up to 1.3 inches

subsp 'Mandshurica ( Manchurian Crabapple )
A vigorous, wide spreading, rounded tree.
Reaches up to 47 feet in height and 34 inches in trunk diameter in 90 years. Earlier flowering.
The finely toothed, taper pointed, elliptical foliage is deep green above, light green beneath.
The abundant, fragrant flowers are white and borne in mid spring.
The very profuse, persistant fruits, up to 0.5 inches in width, are red, borne on long, thin stems.
Hardy zone 2 to 7

* photos taken on August 3 2010 @ University of Guelph Arboretum, Ontario




* photo taken by Dr. Nick V. Kurzenko @ CalPhotos


'Midwest'
A selection from Malus baccata mandshurica that is very early leafing out and also very early in bloom with white flowers somewhat larger than average. The fruits are up to 0.5 inches in width. Fast growing, it can reach 20 feet in 10 years.
Tolerating as low as -40 F, drought tolerant and insect and disease resistant, it is an excellent landscape tree for the Upper Midwest.

* Photo courtesy of USDA NRCS.


'Ranetka'
Vigorous growing with abundant, white flowers and purple fruit.
Hardy north to zone 2, excellent for climates with extreme cold such as the Canadian Prairies.

'Street Parade'
An upright narrow form, reaching up to 27 feet. It is otherwise similar to the species with white flowers and purplish-red fruits. It is highly valuable as a street tree on narrow urban streets.

Malus brevipes ( Nippon Crabapple )
A spreading, small, deciduous tree, reaching a maximum size of 22 x 32 ( rarely over 15 x 15 ) feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet; that is native to Japan.
The oval leaves are bright green, turning to deep green. The foliage turns to yellow during autumn.
The flowers are pale pink in bud, opening to white.
The scarlet-red berries, up to 0.5 inches wide, persist well into winter.
Hardy zones 4b to 8.

Malus coronaria ( American Sweet Crabapple )
A moderate growing, dense, spreading, medium-size to large tree native to North America ( from Iowa to northern Illinois to central Michigan to Grand Bend, Ontario to Toronto, Ontario to central New York State; south to Arkansas to Tennessee to Virginia ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant from the Amherstburg area through Leamington through absent from Point Pelee and most of the Lake Erie islands during the 1800s. It was also abundant at Detroit during that time. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; 20 years - 27 x 27 feet; largest on record - 70 x 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.6 feet.
The sharply double-toothed, oval leaves are up to 5.5 x 4 inches in size. The foliage is reddish and downy at first, turning to deep green and smooth above, then to red during autumn.
The very fragrant flowers, up to 3.2 inches wide are deep pink in bud, opening to pale pink. They are borne in clusters of 3 to 6 during mid-spring with the emerging foliage.
The fruits are yellow-green and up to 2 inches wide. They are very acidic and not edible. The fruits often persist through November. The fruits are edible but can be used for jellies or sauces.
The grayish slender twigs are often thorny.
The vertically fissured, scaly bark is light brown to red-brown.
Hardy zones 2 to 7, very prone to scab and rust disease.

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Herman, D.E., et al. 1996. North Dakota tree handbook

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photos taken on Apr 22 2015 in Ellicott City, MD

* photos taken on Apr 30 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Apr 20 2017 in Columbia, MD

* historic archive photos


'Big-O'
Very disease resistant, it is well adapted to the humid southeast. It generally breeds true from seed. It was originally developed at USDA Jimmy Carter Plant Materials Center at Americus, Georgia.

* Photos courtesy of USDA NRCS.


'Charlotte'
Fragrant, double flowers, up to 2 inches across are orange-pink in bud opening to light pink.
Scab resistant.

Malus x domestica ( APPLE )
These are the Apples of commercial production which are derived from Malus sylvestris.They are typically rounded to broadly spreading and can reach up to 50 feet. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 7 ( rarely over 4 ) feet; largest on record - 80 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet; longest lived - 244 years.
The toothed oval leaves are up to 5 x 3 inches in size. The foliage is yellow-green during spring, maturing deep green above and whitish downy beneath.
The flowers, up to 2 inches across are deep pink in bud opening white with a pink tinge. They are borne as the foliage develops in mid spring.
Apples need pollinators to set good crops.
The typically sweet tasting, rounded edible fruits can be up to 5 inches across.
A well grown Apple tree can produce as much as 440 pounds of fruit per year!!!
Regular water, proper fertilization, cultivar selection, pruning and having no turf or weed competition in root zone is key to high production.
Apples are rich in Vitamins, especially when eaten raw. Do not peel the skin unless necessary since the skin contains 5 times as much Vitamin C as the flesh.
Apples are also great made into juices, pies, muffins, sauces and preserves. They keep well as long as they are undamaged and refridgerated.
Apple Cider is apple juice that begins to ferment after being left in a jug in a warm place. If left too long, it will turn to alcohol.
Apple cider made from the fruit have an alcohol content higher than that of beer.
Apple pectin made from the residue left over from juice making is important and used for the tempering steel during manufacture as well as glues and tooth paste.
Apple pomace also makes great garden fertilizer.
The stems are hairy and are not thorned.
The scaly gray-brown bark peels in thin, small plates.
Apple wood is beautifully grained but due to the short stature of these trees, is rarely used commercially. The wood is hard and difficult to work but can be used for cabinetmaking and tool handles. Apple wood makes excellent firewood, giving off around 24 million Btu per cord.
Hardy zone 3 to 9 in full sun on moist, deep, fertile, well drained soil.
They are prone to a number of pests and diseases. Apples are reproduced from seed soaked for 24 hours and sown during autumn. Cultivars are reproduced by budding and grafting.

* excellent videos found on Youtube

* photo of unknown internet source




* photos taken on Aug 2 2011 in Hyde Park, NY


* photos taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photos taken on July 27 2015 in Bayfield, ON

* historical archive photos


'Freedom'
Bright red fruit.
Immune to scab, fireblight, mildew & Cedar-apple rust resistant. Tolerates as low as -45 F

'Golden Delicious'
White fleshed, golden-yellow fruits.
Hardy north to zone 5 and is Cedar-apple Rust resistant.

* excellent video found on Youtube

'Granny Smith'
Large yellow apple. An excellent pollinator

'McIntosh'
Large red apple. Hates long hot summers and is very prone to scab. Grows poorly in the southern U.S.

* excellent video found on Youtube

'Millstream'
An excellent fruiting Apple bred for use on the northern Great Plains, even bearing fruit as far north as Edmonton in Alberta's harsh climate. Some records include: 5 years - 14.5 x 12.5 feet.
The fruit are up to 3.5 inches across.
Hardy north to zone 2b

'Morden Festival'
Flowers are white.
Hardy north to zone 2b.

'Mutsu'
Very large vigorous tree.
Very large yellow fruit.

'Red Delicious'
Excellent tasting, white fleshed, deep red fruits.
The fruits are short keeping.
Hardy north to zone 5 and is prone to scab but is Cedar-apple Rust and fireblight resistant .



'Redlove Calypso'


'Spartan'
Bright red fruit.
Immune to scab, fireblight, mildew & Cedar-apple rust resistant. Tolerates as low as -45 F.

* excellent video found on Youtube

'Wealthy'
Compact bearing prolific large yellow, very juicy fruits. Resistant to scab, fire blight and Cedar-apple Rust.
Hardy north to zone 2

Malus florentina ( Ltalian Crabapple )
A beautiful, erect to rounded, small tree with spreading branches that is native to Italy, the Balkans and northern Turkey. It is very rare in the wild and in cultivation. Some records include: 20 years - 17 x 17 feet; 48 years - 33 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet; largest on record - 37 x 20 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet.
The toothed, broadly-ovate, lobed Hawthorn-like leaves are up to 4 x 2 inches in size. The foliage is deep green above; downy white beneath; turning to scarlet-red during late autumn. The foliage often remains green into mid-November.
The white flowers, up to 1.5 inches wide are borne in clusters during late spring after the foliage has emerged.
The oval fruits, up to 0.5 inches across, are yellow later ripening to red.
The red-brown bark flakes off to reveal orange-brown bark beneath. The stems are not thorned.
Hardy zone 4 to 9.

Malus floribunda ( Japanese Flowering Crabapple )
A rare, dense, spreading, medium-sized tree native to Japan that is among the most beautiful of all the Malus. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 6 feet; 20 years - 17 x 20 feet; largest on record - 48 x 53 feet with a trunk diameter of 34 inches. It is moderately long-lived, to 115 years or possibly more.
The sharply-toothed, taper-pointed, elliptical leaves are up to 4.5 x 2 inches in size. The foliage appears very early in spring and matures to deep green as summer approaches.
The very abundant, fragrant, single flowers are up to 1.5 inches wide, are borne in clusters during early spring. They are dark pink to red in bud, opening to light pink ( sometimes almost white ).
The fruits, up to 0.8 inches, are yellow to red and persist well into winter.
The purple-brown bark flakes into thin plates.
Hardy zones 4b to 8, it is among the best Crabapples for the southeastern U.S.. Prone to powdery mildew but resistant to most other Crabapple diseases.

* photos taken on Apr 27 2015 in Columbia, MD

* historic archive photos

* excellent photo link found on internet
http://www.biolib.cz/en/taxon/id39553/

Malus formosana ( Taiwan Crabapple )
Also called Malus doumeri. The largest of all Crabapples, native to southeast China and northern Vietnam, reaches a maximum height of 100 feet or more.
The elliptical leaves are up to 6 x 3 inches.
The creamy-white flowers are up to an inch across.
They are followed by fruits up to 2 inches across.
Hardy north to zone 8

Malus fusca ( Oregon Crabapple )
A fast growing, medium-size tree native to western North America ( from Homer, Alaska to northern California ). On poor and swampy sites it is shrubby forming dense thickets rather than tree-like. Some records include: largest on record - 80 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet. It is closely related to Malus baccata.
The toothed, elliptical leaves are up to 4 x 3.5 inches in size. The deep green foliage turns to red during autumn. Leaves on vigorous shoots may be 3 lobed.
The single flowers, up to 2 inches wide, are white to whitish pink, borne in large clusters of up to 10 during spring with the emerging leaves. The Oregon Crabapple typically flowers only every other year.
The oblong fruits, up to 0.8 inches in length, are yellow-tinted with red. The fruits are edible but can be used for jellies or sauces.
The slender twigs are shiny red.
The bark is reddish-brown with large scales.
Hardy zone 1 to 8 tolerating as low as -70 F and even grows in Fairbanks, Alaska. Flood tolerant and very disease resistant. Very rare in cultivation.

* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos


Malus glabrata ( Biltmore Crabapple )
A small tree native to the Appalations from northern Georgia to Virginia. Some records include: largest on record - 25 x 25 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot.
The roughly triangular leaves with 3 to 5 coarsely toothed, pointed lobes, are up to 4 x 3.5 inches in size.
The pink flowers are borne in clusters from 4 to 7.
The fruits, up to 1.5 inches across, are green.
The twigs often have spines up to 1.5 inches in length.
Hardy north to zone 6

Malus halliana ( Halls Crabapple )
A small tree reaching around 20 feet with a loose open habit. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 20 years - 17 x 17 feet; largest on record - 30 x 47 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 foot.
The oblong leaves, up to 4 inches long, are borne on red stalks. The glossy deep green foliage often has a purple tint.
The single flowers, up to 1.5 inches across are bright rose-pink. The flowers are borne profusely every year.
The fruits, up to 0.3 inches wide, are purplish and persist into winter.
Hardy zone 4 to 9. Very soil tolerant as well as drought tolerant.
Propagation is from seed though cultivars are from softwood cuttings taken late spring which root easily under mist ( 3000 ppm IBA ) in about 4 weeks.

* photo taken on March 28 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photo taken on April 11 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum

* photos taken on Nov 17 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Apr 17 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


'Adirondack'
A moderate to fast growing, narrow upright form reaching around 18 x 16 feet in 20 years.
The leathery leaves, up to 6 x 1.5 inches in size, are deep green.
The slightly fragrant flowers are red in bud, opening to white.
They are followed by abundant, bright orange-red fruits, up to 0.6 inches across, that persist into early winter.
Highly resistant to cedar-apple rust, scab, powdery mildew and fire blight.

* photos taken on Aug 3 2012 @ University of Western Ontario, London, ON

* photo taken on Apr 24 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken on Apr 16 2017 in Pikesville, MD

* photo taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Parkmanii'
A rounded tree reaching a maximum height of 20 ( rarely over 15 ) feet.
The foliage is glossy bronze-green.
The semi-double to double flowers are bright rose-pink in bud opening to mid pink.
They are borne in clusters on long crimson red stalks.
The fruits are deep red.
It is very disease resistant.

Malus x hartwegii
An upright small tree that is the garden raised hybrid between Malus baccata & Malus halliana. Some records include: largest on record - 40 x 35 feet with a trunk diameter of 32 inches.
The smooth edged, pointed oval leaves are up to 3 inches in length. The foliage is deep green.
The semi-double flowers, up to 2 inches across, are deep pink at first, fading to white.
The slow ripening fruits, up to 0.5 inches across, are deep red.
The bark is dark brown.
Hardy zones 4 to 9

Malus honanensis ( Honan Crabapple )
A small tree reaching a maximum size of 23 feet, that is native to the Chinese provinces of Gansu, Hebei, Henan, Hubei, Shaanxi and Shanxi.
The doubly-toothed to lobed, broadly-ovate leaves are up to 3 x 2.5 inches in size. The very attractive foliage, turns to scarlet-red in autumn.
The flowers are white and are followed by tiny yellow fruit, up to 0.3 inches across.
Hardy north to zone 5.

Malus hupehensis ( Hupeh Crabapple )
Also called Tea Crabapple. It is a vigorous, lush-foliaged, medium-size, spreading tree native to mountain forests of China and is upright when young, open and spreading with age. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; 10 years - 40 feet; 20 years - 33 x 27 feet; largest on record - 60 x 45 feet with a trunk diameter of 31 inches.
The finely-toothed, taper-pointed, elliptical leaves are up to 5.5 x 2.5 inches in size. The foliage is purplish at first turning smooth deep green during summer then to orange in autumn.
The very abundant, single, fragrant flowers, up to 2 inches wide, are pink in bud, opening to white. They are borne in large clusters during mid-spring after the foliage has emerged. Often flowers every other year.
The fruits, up to 0.5 inches are very glossy deep red and hang in clusters, persisting well into winter.
The orange-brown bark flakes in rectangular plates.
Hardy zone 3 to 8 and very disease resistant. It is even hardy in parts of Alaska. The Hupeh Crabapple always comes true from seed and will not cross with other species.

* photo taken on April 18 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photo taken on Mar 24 2011 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Apr 17 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


'Cardinal'
Glossy red new foliage and bright red flowers; otherwise similar.

'Donald'
Heavy, very shiny foliage. Flowers are white with a pinkish tint.

'Rosea'
Rose-pink flowers.

Malus ioensis ( Prairie Crabapple )
A very beautiful, moderate growing, medium size tree native to the U.S. Midwest from Minnesota to Wisconsin to Ohio; south to Oklahoma and Arkansas. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; 6 years - 15 feet; largest on record - 70 x 54 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.3 feet. A very large tree has been recorded in Oakland County, MI.
The shallowly-lobed, toothed, elliptical leaves are up to 5 x 4 inches in size. The foliage is very glossy green above, downy beneath; turning to brilliant orange-red during autumn.
The pink flowers, up to 2 inches across are borne in clusters of 3 to 6 during mid spring after the foliage has already emerged.
The smooth, hard, acid fruits, up to 2 inches across, are greenish-yellow.
The fruits are edible but can be used for jellies or sauces.
The branchlets are densely hairy when young and are often tipped in sharp spines.
The flaking bark is reddish-brown.
Hardy zone 2 to 7. It is very disease prone, often loosing its foliage early.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photos


'Klehm's Improved Bechtel'
A vase shaped tree.
Foliage is soft green and silky.
The large double flowers are pink and open late for a Crabapple.
The fruit are not a major feature.
Prone to diseases.

'Plena'
Semi-double flowers open pink and fade to white.

'Prairie Rose'
Similar to 'Klehm's Improved Bechtel' but less disease prone.

'Prince Georges'
The double late spring flowers, up to 2 inches across are bright rose-pink.
No fruit. Resistant to leaf scab.

Malus kansuensis ( Kansu Crabapple )
A moderate growing, rounded, small deciduous tree native to northwest China. Some records include: largest on record - 33 x 25 feet with a trunk diameter of 20 inches.
The serrate-edged, 3 or 5 lobed leaves are up to 4 x 2.5 inches in size. Fall color is usually excellent.
The white flowers, up to 0.5 inches wide, are borne in clusters of 4 to 10
The rough surfaced, tiny "apples" are yellow to purplish-red.
The young stems are reddish-brown.
Hardy zone 4 to 7.

Malus x madgeburgensis
A rounded to spreading small tree. Some records include:
largest on record - 30 x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 40 inches.
The pointed, elliptical leaves are deep green above and downy beneath.
The large, semi-double flowers are red in bud, opening to deep pink.
They are borne in dense clusters in spring as the foliage emerges.
The rounded fruits, up to 1.2 inches across, are yellow.
Hardy zone 4 to 7. Very rare.

Malus x micromalus ( Kaido Crabapple )
A small, spreading tree that is the natural hybrid between Malus baccata & M. spectabilis. Some records include: largest on record - 43 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 17 inches.
The serrate-edged, taper pointed leaves, up to 4 inches in length are waxy green.
The pink flowers, up to 2 inches wide, are borne in clusters of 3 to 5.
The fruits, up to 0.5 inches wide, are yellow.
The stems are dark brown.
Hardy zone 4 to 9

Malus orthocarpa
A small tree native to China that reaches up to 32 feet in height and 17 inches in trunk diameter. It is nearly extinct.
The toothed, broad-oval leaves are deep green.
The fruits are bright orange-red.
Hardy zones 6 to 7 ( may prove much hardier with testing ).

Malus prattii
A medium size tree native to western China. Some records include: largest on record - 40 x 33 feet with a trunk diameter of 19 inches.
The minutely-toothed, oval leaves are up to 6.5 x 4.5 inches in size. The foliage is deep green.
The flowers, up to 0.8 inches across, are bright pink.
The oval fruits, up to 0.5 inches across, are red.
Hardy zones 5 to 8.

* photo of unknown internet source


Malus prunifolia ( Ringo Crabapple )
Also called Plumleaf Crabapple. A long-lived, small to medium sized, broadly spreading, dome canopied tree native to northeast Asia. Some records include: largest on record - 46 x 66 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.2 feet.
The toothed, elliptic leaves, up to 4 x 3 inches, are deep green, turning to bronze during autumn.
The fragrant single flowers, up to 1.5 inches across are pink in bud, opening to white. The flowers are borne in clusters of up to 10 in mid spring after the foliage emerges.
The very persistant, rounded fruits, up to 1.5 inches are bright red.
The purple-brown bark flakes in plates revealing freshly exposed red-brown bark beneath.
Hardy zone 3 to 8 and very disease prone. It has proven fully hardy in trials at Indian Head, Saskatchewan and Brandon, Manitoba.

'Cheal's Weeping'
A weeping, small tree, reaching up to 31 feet in height and 12 inches in trunk diameter. Some records include: 20 years - 10 x 8 feet ( average ). The foliage is coppery-red when young. The light pink flowers are followed by small red fruits.

'Rinkii'
An upright to rounded tree, reaching up to 33 x 20 feet in height and 1 foot in trunk diameter.
The deep green foliage turns to bronze during autumn.
The flowers are white.
Hardy zones 3 to 8, it is very disease resistant.

Malus pumila ( European Crabapple )
The ancester of the Apple that is a short-trunked, medium-sized tree native to much of Europe ( mountains only in south ) and western Asia. Some records include: largest on record - 80 feet with a trunk diameter of 4.6 feet.
The toothed, ovate to elliptical leaves, up to 4.5 x 2.3 inches in size, are mid-green.
The flowers, up to 1.6 inches wide, are pink in bud, opening to white with a pink tinge. They appear during late spring.
The large fruits are up to 2 inches across.
The fissured or plated bark is brown. The stems rarely have thorns.
Hardy zone 3 to 9. It is prone to all major Malus diseases.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Herman, D.E., et al. 1996. North Dakota tree handbook

* photo taken on Apr 16 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Sep 17 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Nov 28 2015 in Harrisburg, PA

* photo taken on June 1 2017 in Columbia, MD

* historic archive photo


'Cowichan'
A vigorous, rounded, spreading tree reaching up to 30 x 30 feet.
The oval leaves, up to 5 inches in length are red-purple at first turning to deep green.
The large red-pink flowers are borne in mid spring.
The fruits, up to 1.5 inches across are red-purple.
Hardy zone 4 to 7

'Dartmouth'
Reaches up to 25 feet in height.
Bears abundant, white flowers. The large fruits, up to 2 inches across are reddish-purple.
Hardy north to zone 2

Var 'dasyphylla'
Also called Malus dasyphylla. A medium-sized tree, that is a widespread native of southeastern Europe; north to Austria to Hungary to Romania. It is often found on floodplains within the Danube River basin.
The toothed, elliptical leaves, are up to 4.5 x 2 inches in size.
The white flowers are up to 1.5 inches wide.
They are followed by sour, yellowish ( rarely red ) fruits, up to 1.6 inches wide. The stems are usually thorned, unlike Malus pumila.


subsp 'Niedzwetzkyana'
A small to medium-sized deciduous tree, native to central Asia ( Kazakhstan; Kyrgyzstan; Uzbekistan; south to Afghanistan & northwestern China ) where it is endangered.
The foliage is deep purple at first, turning to deep green.
The intense pink flowers are borne mid to late spring.
They are followed by purplish-red fruits, up to 1.6 inches wide.
The bark is reddish-brown.
It is very drought tolerant.

subsp 'Sylvestris' ( European Wild Apple )
Largest on record - 60 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 4.4 feet.
Has slightly hairy foliage but is otherwise very similar.

Malus x purpurea ( Purple Crab )
These dense, erect to spreading small trees are the hybrids between Malus x atrosanguinea & Malus pumila 'Niedzwetzkyana' ( originating in Turkestan in central Asia ). Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; 20 years - 27 x 27 feet; largest on record - 45 x 32 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet.
The pointed, elliptic foliage, up to 4 x 3 inches, is purple in spring turning to bronze green or deep green in summer.
The flowers, up to 1.5 inches wide are red-purple in bud opening to deep purple-pink. They are borne in clusters with the emerging foliage in mid-spring.
The abundant fruits, up to an inch across, are red-purple.
Hardy zones 4 to 9. Scab resistant.

* photo taken on Apr 11 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Apr 22 2015 in Ellicott City, MD

* photo taken on Apr 23 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 2 2015 in Towson, MD


'Altenhamensis'
Some records include: largest on record - 37 feet with a trunk diameter of 16 inches.
Longest lived - potential to live up to 73 years or more.
Foliage is red-green.
The single to semi-double flowers are deep red in bud opening to pinkish-red.
Prolific blooming, it may bloom as many as 3 times in a season.
The fruits are up to an inch across.

'Eleyi'
Some records include: largest on record - 45 x 45 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet.
Foliage is deep reddish-purple and up to 4 inches in length.
The flowers, up to 1.5 inches across are purplish-red. The conical purple fruits are up to 1.2 inches across.
Unfortunately disease prone, especially scab.

'Lemoinii'
Erect to rounded in habit, it reaches up to 33 feet in height.
Some records include: largest on record - 45 x 45 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.8 feet. Long-lived for a Crabapple, it is known to live for 70 years or more.
The leaves are dark bronze-purple in spring turning to purplish-green during summer then red late in autumn.
They are often unevenly lobed.
The large, single, wine-red flowers are up to 1.5 inches across.
The single to semi-double flowers are pink-red. The "cherry-like" fruits, up to 0.6 inches in width are deep purple.
Hardy zone 3 to 8

'Radiant'
A fast growing weeping small tree. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; largest on record - 30 x 30 feet.
The foliage is reddish at first in spring later aging to green in summer then to bronze in autumn.
The single flowers are deep red in bud, opening to deep pink.
The profuse red cherry like fruits are up to 0.3 inches in width.
Hardy zone 3 to 7; it is very disease resistant to mildew, scab, cedar-apple rust, and fire blight.

'Thundercloud'
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4.5 feet; largest on record - 35 x 45 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet.
The foliage is deep reddish-purple.
The flowers are purplish-red.
Unfortunately disease prone.
Disease free and exceptionally hardy north to zone 2, thriving even in Alberta.

* photo taken on July 17 2016 in Blyth, ON

* photo taken on Jul 17 2017 in Ottawa, ON


Malus x robusta ( Cherry Crab )
A vigorous conical to spreading tree that is the hybrid between Malus baccata & M. prunifolia. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; 20 years - 27 x 27 feet; largest on record - 56 x 62 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.6 feet.
The scallop-edged, elliptical leaves, up to 4.3 inches in length, are bright green.
The flowers, up to 1.5 inches wide and in clusters of 5 to 8 vary from white to pale pink.
The long stemmed, persistant, "cherry-like" fruits, up to an 1.3 inches across range from yellow to red.
Hardy zones 3 to 7. Scab resistant.

* photos taken on Jul 18 2017 @ Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, ON

* photo taken on Jul 18 2017 @ Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, ON

* photos taken on Jul 17 2017 in Ottawa, ON


'Red Sentinel'
Reaches up to 40 x 40 feet and 20 inches in trunk diameter

'Red Siberian'
Vigorous and conical in habit, reaching a maximum size of 40 x 30 feet.
The foliage is luxuriant deep green.
The persistent glossy red fruits are up to 0.7 inches across.

Malus rockii
Also called Malus baccata subsp. himalaica. A semi-weeping, small tree that is native to southeast Tibet, southwest Sichuan and northwest Yunnan Provinces in China. Some records include: largest on record - 40 x 36 feet with a trunk diameter of 27 inches.
The ovate or elliptical leaves, up to 5 x 2.8 inches, are very dark green.
The white flowers are borne 4 to 8 in corymbs up to 2.3 inches wide, during late spring.
They are followed by red fruits, up to 0.6 inches wide, during early autumn. The fruits are larger than closely related M. baccata.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 and disease free.

Malus sargentii ( Sargent Crabapple )
A densely-branched large shrub to small tree typically without a leader. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 10 years - 6.6 x 13 feet; largest on record - 17 x 34 feet with a trunk diameter of 9 inches. It is native to Japan but is now extinct in the wild.
The thick, toothed edged ( often lobed ), sharply-pointed, broadly-oval leaves are up to 3 inches in length and usually have a pair of lobes at their base. The foliage appears very early during spring.
The abundant, fragrant, single flowers up to an inch across are white. It typically only blooms well in alternate years.
The long-lasting fruit, up to 0.5 inches across, are scarlet-red.
Hardy zone 4 to 8.

* photos taken on Aug 24 2013 in Columbia, MD


'Rosea'
Flowers are deep red-pink in bud opening to white.
The fruits are deep red.

'Roseglow'

* Photos courtesy of USDA NRCS.


'Tina'
A very beautiful, dwarf form that remains a dense spreading shrub, reaching a maximum of 8 x 10 feet.
It bears white ( pink in bud ) flowers, that are followed by showy, small red fruits that persist well into winter.
It is highly disease resistant.

* photos taken on Aug 24 2017 @ U.S. Botanic Garden, Wash. DC.


Malus x schiedeckeri
A small upright tree that is the hybrid between Malus floribunda & M. prunifolia.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; largest on record - 33 x 35 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet.
The leaves are coarsely-serrated, up to 5 inches in length.
The clustered, semi-double flowers, up to 2 inches across are light rose-pink.
The fruits, up to 0.7 inches across are golden-orange.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 and is scab resistant.

'Hillieri'
A vigorous, spreading tree, reaching up to 23 x 23 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot. The outer branches are often moderately weeping
The oval leaves are deep green.
The single, pink ( red in bud ) flowers are borne during late spring.
They are followed by large, yellow-red fruits. The fruits are good for making jellies.
It is prone to scab.

Malus sieboldii ( Toringo Crabapple )
A moderate growing, small rounded tree to around 15 x 10 feet, that is native to central & eastern China, Korea and most of Japan. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; 10 years - 10 x 13 feet; largest on record - 33 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.3 feet; longest lived - 170 ( possibly more ) years.
The sharply-toothed, elliptic leaves are up to 3.5 x 2 inches in size. The deep green foliage turns to bright orange and red in fall.
The fragrant flowers open deep pink turning pink then fading to white. They are up to 1.5 inches wide and are borne small clusters, up to 2.3 inches wide, during mid-spring.
They are followed by very persistent, red fruits up to 0.5 inches wide.
The dark gray bark cracks into small plates.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 ( tolerating as low as -33 F ) it is tolerant of clay, drought and salt but needs well drained soil. Seed source from Liaoning Province in China is likely hardier to zone 3. It is disease resistant and not affected by leaf scab.

* photos taken on Feb 2009 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C

* photo taken on April 11 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken on August 3 2010 @ University of Guelph Arboretum, Ontario

* photo taken on Apr 24 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


* excellent photo link found on internet
http://www.biolib.cz/en/taxon/id214894/

'Arborescens'
More vigorous with larger foliage and white flowers. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; 40 years - 50 x 30 feet; largest on record - 80 x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.2 feet ( huge for a Crabapple! )

* photo of unknown internet source



'Macrocarpa'
A clone originating in Kansu Province in China that is likely now extinct. It reaches a maximum size of 80 feet making it among the largest of all Crabapples.
The fruits, up to 1.3 inches across taste like Persimmon.

Malus sieversii
Also called Malus kirghisorum. A rounded, small tree, that is native to mountains of central Asia ( Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan and China in the Tianshan mountains ) where it is endangered with extinction. Though now in rapid decline due to habitat loss, it once formed extensive pure stand forests in Kazakhstan. It reaches a maximum size of 40 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter up to 3 feet and can live up to 170 years.
It is the ancestor of many domestic Apple cultivars however unlike most cultivated Apples, this wild form has foliage which turns deep red during autumn. The broad oblanceolate leaves are up to 4 x 2.4 inches in size.
The pale pink flowers, up to 2 inches across. They are followed by tasty large red Apples, up to 3.2 x 3.2 inches in size, which are the largest of any wild species of Malus.
It is hardy in cold climates ( zones 4 to 7 ) and has superior disease resistance especially to Apple Scab.

* photos of unknown internet source


Malus sikkimensis ( Sikkin Crabapple )
A medium size tree, reaching a maximum size of 43 feet with a trunk diameter of 27 inches, that is native to the Himalayas from India, Nepal and Bhutan into China. It is threatened with extinction in the wild.
The ovate leaves are up to 2.8 x 1.2 inches in size. The white flowers are borne 6 to 10 in corymbs up to 3.5 inches wide, at the end of spring.
The glossy deep red, cherry-like fruits are up to 1.2 inches wide.
Hardy zones 5 to 8.

Malus spectabilis ( Chinese Flowering Crabapple )
A very spectacular, upright, rounded, medium-size tree that was introduced into cultivation in the West pre 1780 and is now extinct in the wild. It was originally native to northern China. Some records include: 20 years - 20 x 20 feet; largest on record - 50 x 35 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet. It is known to grow in Washington, D.C. @ Dumbarton Oaks.
The glossy deep green, oval leaves are up to 4 x 2.5 inches in size. The foliage is glossy deep green.
The single flowers, up to 2.3 inches wide, are deep rose-red in bud opening to bright pink.
The very acid fruits, up to 1.3 inches across are yellow.
Hardy zone 4 to 8

* historic archive photos


'Riversii'
Larger leaves. The largest double pink flower of all the Crabapples.

Malus transitoria ( Tibetan Crab Apple )
A very attractive rare graceful broadly spreading tree native to northwestern China. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; 5 years - 10 x 12 feet; largest on record - 37 x 33 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet.
The deeply 3 lobed, sharply-toothed, broadly-ovate leaves are up to 3 x 3 inches in size. The foliage is bright green above, paler green and thinly hairy below; turning to yellow during autumn.
The white, single flowers, up to 0.8 inches wide are borne in small clusters during mid-spring as the foliage emerges.
The fruits, up to 0.4 ( usually under 0.25 ) inches wide are yellow to scarlet.
The purple-brown bark cracks into smooth vertical plates with age.
Hardy zone 3 to 8 and is unfortunately very prone to scab. Very drought tolerant.

'Golden Raindrops'
An attractive landscape tree, fast growing and upright when young becoming vase-shape or spreading to 20 x 18 feet. Dense with good branching habit.
The deeply-lobed leaves are glossy deep green, turning to orange-red during autumn
Flowers are bright pinkish-red
The bright yellow fruits, up to 0.4 inches wide, are persistent lasting into winter.
Excellent resistance to scab, rust & fireblight. Good resistance to mildew

'Royal Raindrops'
An excellent landscape tree, fast growing and upright when young becoming spreading to 20 x 18 feet. Dense with good branching habit.
Foliage is deeply lobed & deep purple spring and summer then turning to orange-red in autumn
Flowers are bright pinkish-red
Fruits are 0.25 inches, red & persistent lasting into winter.
Excellent resistance to scab, rust & fireblight. Good resistance to mildew.

* photos taken on on Aug 23 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Apr 1 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Apr 13 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Apr 22 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Apr 27 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 16 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 21 2017 in Columbia, MD


Malus trilobata ( Turkish Crabapple )
Also called Mapleleaf Crabapple. A vigorous narrow conical tree with erect branches, that is native to Greece and southwest Asia. Some records include: 20 years - 33 x 6.6 feet; largest on record - 50 x 25 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet.
The lobed leaves, up to 4 x 5 inches are Maple-like in shape. The foliage is smooth and glossy deep green above, light green and hairy below. The foliage turns red in autumn.
The large white flowers, up to 1.5 inches wide are borne in late spring in clusters at the stem tips.
The hard fruits, up to 0.8 inches wide are yellow or red.
The fluted trunk is covered in dark gray-brown bark that cracks into many small squares.
Hardy zones 5 to 8

* photo taken by Milan Havlis, owner of Europe's premier plant nursery


Malus tschonoskii
A fast growing, dense, pyramidal, large tree native to Japan that reaches 50 feet or more. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; 5 years - 15 x 8 feet; 20 years - 50 x 20 feet; largest on record - 70 x 22 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.2 feet; largest in England - 50 feet.
The coarsely toothed, pointed, broadly oval leaves are up to 5 x 3 inches. The foliage is silvery-white and felted at first in spring, turning to smooth, glossy mid-green above and thinly hairy gray below. The leaves turn brilliant orange and red in autumn.
The flowers, up to 1.3 inches wide are white with a rose-pink flush at first, turning to pure white. The flowers are borne in clusters of up to 5 in late spring.
The small, rounded brownish-yellow fruits, up to 1.3 inches wide serve little ornamental value.
The purple-brown bark is smooth on young trees later becoming rough and fissured.
Hardy zones 3 to 8. Unfortunately prone to most Malus diseases though only slightly prone to scab.

Malus yunnanensis ( Yunnan Crabapple )
A moderate growing, broadly columnar small tree to around 33 feet that is native to mountain woods of western and central China. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; largest on record - 46 x 45 feet with a trunk diameter of 26 inches.
The finely-toothed leaves, up to 7.3 x 4.2 inches, are broadly ovate, pointed at the tip and with a heart shaped base.
The handsome foliage is matte green above and softly gray hairy below. The leaf veins turn red in late summer the entire foliage turns crimson-red in autumn. The autumn color is excellent.
The leaves are borne on long red stalks, up to 2.5 inches in length.
The white flowers, up to 0.5 inches across, are borne in flattened clusters in late spring.
The hard, rounded, dark red fruits, up to 0.5 inches across, are borne in dense clusters.
The attractive deep gray-brown bark flakes off to reveal orange-brown bark beneath.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 with excellent disease resistance. While many other Crabapples in the cool summer Pacific Northwest lack vigor and have disease ridden foliage by mid summer; this one grows vigorously and has excellent very healthy foliage until late fall. Very soil tolerant and tolerates wet soil more than most Crabapples.

'Veitchii'
Reaches up to 47 feet in height and 19 inches in trunk diameter in 80 years.
Has a more upright growth habit and darker fruits.

Malus x zumi ( Zumi Crabapple )
A very dense, strong wooded, rapid growing, pyramidal tree that is the natural hybrid between Malus baccata mandschurica & Malus sieboldii. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; 15 years - 20 x 15 feet; 20 years - 23 x 23 feet; largest on record - 40 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet; longest lived - known to reach 85 years and more.
The scalloped to lobed edged, taper-pointed, oval leaves, up to 4 x 1.5 inches are deep green turning to yellow or red during autumn
The fragrant, white ( pink in bud ) flowers, up to 1.3 inches across, open over a period lasting up to 3 weeks during late spring.
They are followed by long lasting scarlet-red fruits up to 0.5 inches across.
The fruits often persist into February.
Hardy zones 3 to 8. Very scab resistant.

'Calocarpa'
More spreading in habit with leaves that are lobed except on fruiting spurs in which case they are smooth edged.
Profuse, very persistent fruits.

'Wooster'
Excellent disease resistance

COMPLEX HYBRIDS
Most are hardy zones 4 to 9
* photo taken on Nov 17 2010 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Apr 2 2011 in Bel Air, MD




* photos of unknown internet source




* photo taken on Aug 3 2013 in Grand Bend, Ontario

* historic archive photo


'Adams'
Dense & rounded, reaching up to 25 x 20 feet in 15 years. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 5 feet; largest on record - 28 x 33 feet with a trunk diammeter of 1.1 foot. .
The oval leaves are up to 3 inches in length. The foliage is red at first during spring turning to mid-green during summer then red in autumn.
The fragrant flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are red in bud, opening up to deep pink. They persist as long as 3 weeks during late spring.
The very persistent, glossy red fruits are up to 0.6 inches across. They ripen during early autumn and persist through the winter.
Zones 2 to 8, it has excellent resistance to rust & fireblight and good resistance to scab & mildew.

* photo taken on Apr 22 2015 in Elkrdige, MD


'Ballerina'
An upright tree reaching 15 feet.
The cupped single flowers are pure white in bud and opened.
The apples are bright yellow.

'Beverly'
Upright at first becoming spreading, dense and rounded to 25 x 20 feet. Some records include: largest on record - 27 x 26 feet with a trunk diammeter of 10 inches..
The toothed, elliptical leaves are up to 3 inches in length. The foliage is healthy, deep green all summer turning to yellow during autumn.
The flowers are reddish-pink in bud opening to white.
The abundant fruits are bright glossy red up to 0.7 inches and are persistent in the fall.
Excellent resistance to scab, rust & mildew; good resistance to Fireblight.
Zone 4
Originated at Morton Arboretum in Lisle, Illinois

'Bobwhite'
A spreading, small to medium-sized tree, reaching a maximum size of 27 x 33 feet. Some records include: 5 years - 14 x 11 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 inches.
The oval leaves are bright green at first, turning to mid-green. The foliage turns to deep yellow or orange during autumn.
The abundant, fragrant flowers are red in bud, opening to white.
The very attractive display of golden-yellow fruit, up to 0.6 inches wide, persist well into winter.

'Brandywine'
A rapid growing, dome-shaped tree reaching a maximum size of 25 x 26 feet. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3.3 feet.
The foliage is purplish at first, turning to deep reddish-green, then to orange-brown during autumn.
The fragrant double flowers are deep red-pink in bud, opening to rose-pink.
The fruits, up to 1.2 inches wide, are yellow-green ( red ).
Hardy north to zone 3

'Burgundy'
Some records include: largest on record - 25 x 26 feet
Foliage is medium green.
The flowers are intense rose-red

'Butterball'
A spreading tree reaching a maximum size of 27 x 27 feet. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 4 feet.
The broadly-ovate leaves are up to 3 inches in length. The foliage is grayish-green at first, turning to deep green.
The flowers are pinkish-white and are followed by orange-yellow fruits up to 1.5 inches across that persist through winter.

'Callaway'
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; largest on record - 27 x 26 feet
The oval leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are mid-green.
The flowers are pink in bud opening to white.
The persistant deep red fruits are up to 1.3 inches across.
It is resistant to mildew and other diseases and likes mild climates.

* photos taken on Apr 17 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


'Cardinal'
see Malus hupehensis.

'Centurion'
An offspring of Malus prunifolia that is upright in habit and reaches a maximum size of 30 x 32 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.3 feet. Some records include: 15 years - 25 x 20 feet.
The ovate leaves are up to 4 inches in length. The foliage is purplish-red at first during spring later turning to glossy bronze-green.
The fragrant flowers are red in bud, opening to rosy-red over a period lasting up to 3 weeks during late spring.
The glossy red fruits, up to 0.6 inches across are long lasting.
Hardy zones 3 to 7, it is highly disease resistant.

* photo taken on Jul 18 2017 @ Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, ON


'Cheltenham'
Reaches up to 30 feet in height with a trunk diameter of 11 inches.

'Chilko'
Reaches up to 30 x 25 feet in height and 15 inches in trunk diameter.
The oval leaves, up to 3.5 inches in length, are red-purple, later turning to deep green.
The single flowers, up to 2 inches across are purplish-pink.
The intense red fruits are up to 2 inches across.
It is a Rosybloom Hybrid originating from Malus pumila 'Niedzwetzkyana'

'Coralburst'
A very attractive, slow growing tree, reaching a maximum size of 20 x 30 ( rarely over 15 ) feet. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 1 foot; 10 years - 8 x 8 ( average ) feet; 15 years - 10 x 15 feet ( avg ). It has an interesting spreading branching pattern and can be used structurally as a substitute for the Laceleaf Japanese Maples in very cold climates.
The leaves, up to 2 inches in length, are deep green.
The fragrant, double flowers are deep pinkish-red in bud, opening to bright pink. They persist for a period lasting up to 3 weeks during late spring.
They are followed by orange-red fruits, up to 0.5 inches across, ripening during mid-autumn and persisting up to 4 weeks.
Hardy north to zone 3 and is very disease resistant.

* photos taken on Apr 17 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


'Crittendon'
Reaches up to 20 feet in height and 15 inches in trunk diameter.
The flowers are white with a slight pink flushing.
The profuse bright scarlet-red fruits, up to 0.8 inches wide, are very persistent.
Hardy north to zone 4

'David'
A fast growing, compact, rounded tree, reaching a maximum size of 20 x 26 feet. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 3 feet.
The elliptical leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are mid-green. The attractive foliage is very disease resistant.
The abundant flowers, up to 1.5 inches wide, are pink in bud, opening to white.
They are followed by very showy, persistent, scarlet-red berries, up to 0.5 inches across, during autumn. Very disease resistant.

'Dolgo'
A fast growing, attractive, spreading tree. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 5 feet; largest on record - 40 x 44 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.6 feet. It can be very long-lived, exceeding 100 years. It originated from Malus × robusta
The ovate leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are deep green.
The fragrant, white ( pink in bud ) flowers, up to 1.8 inches in width, appear very early.
The flowers are profuse but only in alternate years.
The bright red fruits, up to 2 x 1.2 inches are early ripening and great for making jelly.
Hardy north to zone 2, it resistant to scab, rust and fireblight.

* photos taken on Aug 25 2013 @ University of Maryland, College Park


'Donald Wyman'
A fast growing, rounded, small tree, reaching a maximum size of 25 x 33 feet. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 3 feet.
The elliptical leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are glossy deep green.
The flowers, up to 1.7 inches across, are reddish-pink in bud, opening to white.
They are followed by very showy, glossy scarlet-red fruits, up to 0.5 inches across, that persist into winter. Fruiting and flowering tends to be heavy only in alternate years.
Hardy north to zone 4. Scab resistant. It roots easily from cuttings taken during summer.

* photos taken on Aug 25 2013 @ University of Maryland, College Park


'Dorothea'
A moderate growing, dense, spreading rounded tree, reaching a maximum size of 25 x 30 feet.
The oval leaves are green.
The abundant, semi-double silvery pink flowers are deep red in bud.
They are followed by bright yellow fruits, up to 0.5 inches across, that persist into winter.
Hardy zones 4 to 7.

'Echtermeyer'
A spreading, pendulous low crowned tree.
Largest on record - 27 x 20 feet with trunk diameter of 26 inches.
The oval and sometimes lobed leaves are up to 4 inches in length.. The foliage is bronze-purple during spring, turning to bronze-green during summer.
The flowers are deep reddish-purple in bud, opening to deep pink.
The reddish-purple fruits are up to an inch across.

'Flame'
A medium-sized, spreading tree, reaching up to 20 x 56 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet.
The flowers are pink in bud, opening to white.
The bright red fruits, up to 0.8 inches, are very persistent.
Hardy north to zone 4. It is prone to leaf diseases in humid climates.

'Golden Hornet'
A fast growing spreading upright tree with pendulous outer branches, it is a cultivar of Malus x zumi. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; 5 years - 12 x 8 feet; largest on record - 33 x 33 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet.
The broadly oval foliage is luxuriant deep green.
The abundant, single flowers, up to 1.5 inches wide, are pink in bud opening to white.
The abundant, fruits, up to 1.5 inches are golden-yellow and very persistent.
Hardy north to zone 4. Scab resistant.

* photos taken on Jul 17 2017 in Ottawa, ON


'Goldfinch'
Flowers are white.

'Harvest Gold'
A very fast growing upright tree, reaching a maximum size of 33 x 32 feet. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; 15 years - 20 x 15 feet ( avg ).
The ovate leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are mid-green. The foliage is highly disease resistant.
The single flowers are pinkish-red in bud, opening to white.
Very attractive abundant, small, intense deep golden-yellow apples, up to 0.6 inches across persist into spring.
Hardy zones 4 to 7. It is exceptionally salt tolerant.

* photos taken on Nov 7 2010 in Columbia, MD





* photos taken on Jul 19 2017 @ Major's Hill Park, Ottawa, ON


'Hopa'
A moderate growing, spreading, rounded, small to medium-sized tree, reaching a maximum size of 35 x 47 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.6 feet. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 3 feet.
The oval leaves are deep green, turning to yellow and orange during autumn.
The flowers, up to 2 inches across, are deep red in bud, opening to intense mid-pink. They appear during late spring.
The orange-red fruits, up to 0.7 inches across, ripen during early autumn and are not persistent.
Hardy zones 3 to 8, it is very disease prone in the U.S..

'Indian Magic'
A moderate growing, open, rounded tree, reaching a maximum size of 25 x 34 feet. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 4 feet; 15 years - 18 x 15 feet ( avg ). The foliage is reddish at first, turning to deep green. The fall color is an excellent orange-red.
The fragrant flowers are red in bud opening to deep pink. They appear during late spring.
The abundant fruits, up to 0.6 inches, are glossy red later lightening to deep orange. They often persist through the winter.
Hardy zones 3 to 7. Very good disease resistance on Northern Plains. Intermediate scab resistance elsewhere.

'Indian Summer'
A moderate growing, spreading, rounded tree, reaching a maximum size of 20 x 29 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet. Some records include: 15 years - 20 x 20 feet.
The leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are purplish at first, turning to mid-green. The foliage turns intense orange-red during autumn.
The fragrant flowers are deep pink in bud, opening to rosy-red. They persist for a period lasting up to 4 weeks during late spring.
They are followed by very abundant, very persistent, scarlet-red fruits, up to 0.7 inches across.
Hardy zones 4 to 8, it is very disease resistant.

* photos taken on Apr 17 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


'Jewelberry'
A dense, spreading large shrub, reaching a maximum size of 15 x 16 ( rarely over 12 ) feet.
The leaves, up to 3.5 inches in length, are ovate and sometimes lobed. The foliage is deep green, turning to yellow during autumn.
The flowers, up to 1 inch across, are pink in bud, opening to white.
They are followed by abundant, glossy red berries up to 0.5 inches across, that persist late in autumn.
Hardy zones 4 to 8, it is moderately disease resistant.

'John Downie'
A vigorous erect tree in its youth, later becoming more spreading. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; 5 years - 12 x 8 feet; largest on record - 38 x 23 feet with a trunk diameter of 20 inches.
The elliptic leaves, up to 4 inches in length are bright green in spring, turning to deep green.
The single flowers up to 2 inches across are soft pink in bud opening to white.
The showy, tasty edible, oval to conical fruits, up to 1.5 inches in lenght are orange to scarlet red.
Hardy zones 3 to 7. Disease resistant.

'Karen's Dream'
A upright small tree reaching a maximum of 20 x 20 feet.
The elliptical leaves are mid-green.
The double flowers are deep pink in bud opening to pure white.
They are followed by dark red fruits.
Hardy zones 4 to 7, it is very disease resistant.

'Katherine'
A dense rounded tree, reaching a maximum size of 35 x 28 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot.
The oval leaves are up to 3 inches in length. The foliage is light green deepening to medium green.
The double flowers, up to 2.2 inches across are pinkish-white in bud opening to white.
The fruits, up to 0.5 inches across are bright red flushed with yellow. They persist into early winter.
Hardy zones 3 to 8, it is very scab resistant but moderately prone to other diseases which affect Crabapples.

'Kelsey'
An upright, rounded small tree reaching up to 18 x 23 feet. Some records include: 7 years - 10 x 9 feet.
The foliage is reddish at first, turning to bronze-green. The leaves turn to orange-yellow during autumn.
The double flowers are pink both in bud and while open.
They are followed by persistent, acorn sized, purple-red apples.
Hardy zones 2 to 7, exceptionally hardy, it thrives in the northern Great Plains incl. Alberta.

'Liset'
A dense, broadly-rounded tree. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; largest on record - 27 x 43 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.2 foot.
The ovate and often lobed leaves are up to 3 inches in length. The foliage is red-purple in spring turning to deep bronze-green during summer then to orange in autumn.
The flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are dark red in bud, opening to deep purple-pink. The flowers open as the foliage matures.
The small, dark reddish-purple fruits, up to 0.5 inches across, are persistent.
The shoots are shiny and speckled with lenticels.
Hardy north to zone 4. It is usually scab resistant.

'Louisa'
A very attractive, weeping tree, reaching a maximum size of 20 x 22 feet. Some records include: 15 years - 15 x 15 feet.
The foliage is glossy deep green and persists late in fall.
The abundant, fragrant flowers are red in bud, opening to mid-pink. They persist for a period lasting up to 3 weeks during late spring.
The yellowish-orange fruits, up to 0.4 inches across, are persistent.
Hardy zones 4 to 8, it is very disease resistant.


'Madonna'
A fast growing, compact, upright tree reaching a maximum of 20 x 23 feet.
The large, elliptical leaves are deep green.
The blooms appear early and over a long season. The fragrant, double flowers are white in bud, opening to white.
The fruits are small and brownish-red.
Hardy north to zone 3, it is very disease resistant.


'Makamik'
A rounded medium-sized tree, reaching up to 50 feet in height. Some records include: 7 years - 12 x 9.5 feet.
The foliage emerges bronze, turning to deep green, then to orangish-yellow during autumn.
The fragrant flowers, up to 2 inches wide, are single and purplish-pink.
The are followed by persistant, deep red fruit up to 1 inch wide.
Hardy zones 2b to 6. Exceptionally hardy, it thrives in the northern Great Plains, including Alberta. It is very disease resistant.

* photos taken on July 26 2015 @ Niagara Parks Bot. Gardens, Niagara Falls, ON

* photos taken on July 17 2016 in Blyth, ON

* photos taken on Jul 17 2017 in Ottawa, ON


'Mary Potter'
A broadly-rounded small tree reaching a maximum size of 21 x 31 ( rarely over 15 x 20 ) feet with a trunk diameter of 10 inches. It is the hybrid between Malus atrosanguinea and M. sargentii 'Rosea'.
The ovate leaves are up to 3 inches in length. The foliage is glossy very deep green.
The flowers, up to 1 inch across, are deep pink in bud opening to very bright pink or white.
The glossy deep red fruits, up to 0.5 inches across, are persistent.
Hardy zones 3 to 8.

'May's Delight'
A moderate growing, dense, upright, small tree, reaching a maximum size of 15 x 15 feet. It originated from Malus sargentii but is more vigorous.
The leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are reddish-purple, turning to bronze-green.
The flowers are deep red in bud, opening to bright pink.
They are followed by persistent deep red fruits.
Hardy zones 4 to 7. Very disease resistant.

'Molten Lava'
A weeping small tree, reaching a maximum size of 25 x 27 ( rarely over 18 x 20 ) feet. Some records include: 15 years - 15 x 20 feet.
The ovate leaves are up to 4 inches in length. The foliage is luxuriant mid-green, turning to yellow during autumn.
The fragrant, pure white ( red in bud ) flowers appear for a period lasting up to 3 weeks during late spring.
They are followed by very showy, persistent, scarlet-red fruits, up to 0.5 inches across. They ripen during early autumn and persist into early winter.
Hardy zones 4 to 8. Very disease resistant.

'Morning Princess'
A vigorous, weeping tree with a strong upright central leader; reaching up to 15 x 15 feet. It originated from Malus baccata.
The foliage is deep red at first, turning to purplish-green.
The flowers are deep pink. They are followed by very small, purple, rounded fruits.
Hardy zones 2 to 7, it originates on the northern Great Plains in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.

'Naragansett'
A broad-crowned tree reaching a maximum size of 30 x 40 ( rarely over 20 x 20 ) feet.
The leathery, ovate leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are mid-green.
The single flowers are deep pink in bud opening to white with a pink tinge.
The clustered fruits, up to 0.5 inches across, are glossy red.
Disease resistant and heat tolerant.

* photos taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photo taken on Aug 5 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Orange Crush'
A fast growing, rounded to spreading medium-sized tree.
The foliage is deep green, turning to orange or red during autumn.
The single flowers are bright orange to rose pink in bud opening to orange-red.
They are followed by very persistent, deep red fruits, up to 0.4 inches across.
Hardy zones 4 to 8, it is very disease resistant.

'Ormiston Roy'
A spreading small tree, with the largest on record being only 20 x 28 feet.
The foliage is mid-green, turning to golden-yellow during autumn.
The flowers, up to 1.6 inches wide, are deep pink in bud opening to light pink or white.
They are followed by bright yellow fruits up to 0.5 inches across.
It has good disease resistance.

'Peter Murray'
An upright small tree reaching a maximum size of 15 x 15 feet .
The very abundant, large, single to semi-double flowers are pink in bud opening to white.
They are followed by fruits, up to 0.5 inches across, that are golden yellow with orange tints. The fruit persist into late November.
Hardy zones 4 to 8, it is very disease resistant.

'Pink Beauty'
A small tree, that is the hybrid between Malus baccata & M. niedzwetzkyana. Some records include: largest on record - 25 x 45 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.6 feet.
The single flowers are very pale pink.
They are followed by abundant, pinkish-red, oval fruits, up to 1.6 inches in length, that are short lasting.
Hardy zones 3 to 8.

'Pink Princess'
A low spreading, large shrub to small tree, reaching a maximum size of 10 x 15 feet. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 2.5 feet. It is a dwarf form of Malus sargentii.
The lobed, ovate leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are purplish-red in spring, turning to deep green. They foliage turns to yellow during autumn.
The pale rose-pink flowers, up to 1 inch across, are followed by small, deep red fruits, up to 0.25 inches across, that persist into winter.


'Pink Spires'
Fast growing, narrow and columnar in habit, some records include - 5 years - 15.5 x 9 feet; largest on record - 25 x 15 feet.
The ovate leaves are up to 5 inches in length. The foliage is purplish-red at first, turning to glossy deep greenish-bronze, then finally to orange-yellow during autumn.
The abundant flowers are pink.
The are followed by deep red fruits, up to 0.5 inches across, that last through the winter.
Hardy zones 2 to 7, thriving in the northern Great Plains where it makes a great street tree. It is only moderately scab resistant.

'Prairiefire'
A vigorous, upright to rounded, small tree, reaching a maximum size of 25 x 25 feet. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4.5 feet; 15 years - 20 x 20 feet ( avg. ).
The leaves, up to 4 inches in length are deep purple-red during spring, turning to deep reddish-green.
The fragrant flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are red in bud, opening to reddish-pink. They appear over a period lasting up to 3 weeks during late spring.
The purplish-red fruits, up to 0.5 inches across, persist all winter.
The attractive bark is glossy deep red.
Hardy zones 4 to 7, it is very disease resistant.

* photos taken on Nov 28 2015 in Harrisburg, PA


'Professer Sprenger'
A moderate to fast growing, dense rounded tree that reaches up to 27 feet in height. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; largest on record - 45 x 35 feet.
The broadly-oval leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are glossy deep green turning to yellow in autumn.
The very profuse flowers borne in mid spring are pink in bud opening to white.
The round, orange apples, to 0.5 inches across, persist into February.
Hardy zones 4 to 7, resistant to scab, fireblight, rust, mildew and Japanese Beetle.

'Profusion'
A fast growing, upright spreading tree. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; largest on record - 36 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet.
It is likely a hybrid between Malus 'Lemoinei' and M. sieboldi
The elliptic leaves, up to 3 inches in length are purplish-red during spring later turning to deep green with red veins. The leaves are frequently lobed on vigorous shoots.
The fragrant, single flowers, up to 1.5 inches across are deep purplish-red with a pink center. The abundant flowers are borne in large clusters over a period lasting up to 3 weeks during late spring.
The long lasting, deep red fruits are up to 0.5 inches across.
Hardy zone 3 to 7. Very scab prone.

* photo taken on Apr 22 2015 in Elkridge, MD

* photos taken on Apr 24 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Nov 8 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Apr 15 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 16 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 12 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Jul 19 2017 @ Rideau Hall, Ottawa, ON


'Profusion Improved'
Similar to 'Profusion' but less prone to scab.

* photos taken on Apr 27 2017 in Columbia, MD


'Purple Prince'
A moderate growing, rounded tree, reaching up to 20 x 20 feet in 15 years, eventually to 22 x 30 feet.
The foliage is deep purple at first, turning to purplish-bronze. The foliage turns to glowing orange during autumn.
The fragrant, rosy-red flowers appear during mid-spring.
They are followed by long-lasting, deep red fruits, up to 0.5 inches across, during autumn.
Hardy zones 4 to 7, it is highly disease resistant.

'Rainbow'
Foliage is green and heavily variegated with white marbling.
The abundant white flowers are followed by small, red fruits during early autumn.
Very disease resistant.

'Red Glow'
A vigorous tree, reaching a maximum height of 30 feet.
The foliage is purplish when young.
The large flowers are pink.
They are followed by high quality edible fruits, up to 2 inches across.

'Red Jade'
Strongly weeping and spreading in habit. Some records include: 5 years - 12.5 x 9 feet; 15 years - 15 feet; 20 years - 17 feet; largest on record - 25 x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet. The ovate leaves, up to 3.5 inches in length, are shiny dark green turning to golden-yellow during autumn.
The fragrant flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are pinkish-red in bud opening to pure white. They appear over a period lasting up to 3 weeks during late spring.
The attractive, abundant, glossy scarlet red berries, up to 0.5 inches wide, are very persistent lasting into February.
Hardy zones 3 to 7, very cold hardy and thrives in Alberta but protection from winter wind. It is moderately scab resistant.

* photos taken on April 4 2012 in Columbia, MD
* photos taken on Aug 3 2012 @ University of Western Ontario, London, ON

* photos taken on July 25 2015 @ Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario

* photos taken on Apr 17 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA



'Red Jewel'
A moderate growing, upright, rounded tree, reaching a maximum size of 20 x 22 feet with a trunk diammeter of 9 inches. Some records include: 15 years - 15 x 12 feet ( avg ).
The large, elliptical leaves are glossy deep green, turning to orange during autumn.
The abundant fragrant flowers are pale pink in bud, opening to pure white. They are followed by spectacular, intense scarlet-red ruits that persist all winter, often into April.
Hardy zones 4 to 8, very disease resistant.

* photos taken on Apr 28 2015 in Columbia, MD


'Red Sentinel'
A fast growing, broadly-upright tree, reaching a maximum size of 26 x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 13 inches, that originated from Malus robusta. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet.
The ovate leaves are up to 3 inches in length. The foliage is bright green in spring turning to glossy deep green.
The early appearing flowers, up to 1.3 inches wide are pink in bud, opening to white.
The abundant, glossy scarlet-red apples, up to 1 inch across are very persistent and extremely showy after a snowfall.
Disease free.

'Red Silver'
A vigorous, spreading, rounded, small tree ( fastst recorded growth rate - 3 feet ), reaching up to 25 x 30 feet. The foliage is reddish in spring later turning to deep green.
The rosy-pink flowers are are followed crimson red fruits up to 0.8 inches in width.

'Red Splender'
A fast growing, fairly dense spreading tree. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; largest on record - 33 x 30 feet
The foliage is reddish green during spring turning to semi-glossy green in summer. The leaves turn to russet and red in fall. The leaves are up to 5 inches in length.
The flowers, up to 2 inches wide, are rosy in bud opening to bright pink.
The cherry-like, glossy red fruits, up to 0.7 inches across, persist all winter.
Moderately prone to Fireblight and only slightly prone to scab.
hardy zones 3 to 8.

* photos taken on November 10 2010 in Columbia, MD



* photos taken on Oct 22 2013 in Towson, MD

* photos taken on Nov 28 2015 in Harrisburg, PA


'Robinson'
Very quick growing; this is actually the fastest growing of all Crabapples. It forms a rounded tree to 25 x 30 feet, upright when young eventually becoming spreading and rounded. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 7 ( rarely over 4 ) feet; 15 years - 25 x 20 feet ( avg. ).
The foliage is reddish at first, turning to bronze-green. The leaves often turn to orange during autumn.
The fragrant flowers are deep pink both in bud and when open. They persist over a period lasting up to 3 weeks during late spring.
The dark red fruits, up to 0.5 inches across, persist into winter.
Hardy zones 4 to 7, it has excellent resistants to rust, mildew & fireblight and good resistance to scab.

'Rosseau'
A medium-sized tree. Some records include: largest on record - 40 x 43 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet. An outstanding tree grows at the Royal Botanical Gardens near Hamilton, Ontario.
The foliage is bronze-green at first, turning to deep green.
The flowers, up to 1.7 inches across, are purplish-pink in buds, opening to mid-pink.
They are followed by red fruits, up to 1 inch across.
Hardy zones 2b to 6.

'Royal Beauty'
A strongly weeping tree, reaching up to 4 x 6.5 feet in 5 years, eventually up to 13 x 10 feet.
The foliage is purplish-red at first, turning to deep greenish-purple during summer, then to yellow and bronze during autumn.
The flowers are deep pink.
They are followed by small red fruits during autumn.
Exceptionally hardy, thriving even in Alberta.

'Royalty'
A dense, spreading to rounded, small tree, reaching a maximum size of 30 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 15 inches. Some records include: 15 years - 20 feet.
The leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are dark red, turning to deep purple or purplish-green during summer. The fall color is typically purple.
The fragrant, intense reddish-pink flowers, up to 2 inches wide, appear over a period lasting up to 3 weeks during late spring.
They are followed by purple-red fruits, up to 0.7 inches across.
Hardy zones 3 to 7.

* photos taken on April 23 2010 in Howard County, MD

* photo of unknown internet source


'Rudolph'
A spreading ( upright when young ) small tree, reaching up to 20 x 25 feet.
The leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are purplish-red at first, turning to glossy bronze-green during summer. The leaves turn to yellow during autumn.
The mid-pink flowers are followed by persistent, deep red fruits, up to 0.5 inches across.
Hardy zones 2 to 7. It is considered to be very disease resistant.

'Scarlet Brandywine'
A rapid growing, dome-shaped tree reaching a maximum size of 25 x 26 feet.
The foliage is deep reddish-green. The foliage often develops excellent autumn color.
The fragrant double flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are deep rosy-pink.
The small yellow-green to orange apples, up to 0.6 inches across, persist into winter.
Hardy north to zone 4.

'Selkirk'
Upright when young becoming round, spreading & drooping with age; reaching up to 25 x 38 feet. Grows vigorously, reaching up to 11.5 x 12 feet in 5 years.
The foliage is bronze during spring turning to glossy deep green during summer.
The abundant, large flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are rose-purple in bud opening to deep pink.
They are followed by very glossy, deep red fruits, up to 0.75 inches across, that do not persist past November 1.
Hardy zone 2a to 7. Originating at Morden Research Station in Manitoba, Canada, it is excellent for the northern Great Plains including Alberta. Excellent rust resistance, good Fireblight resistance & fair scab & mildew resistance.

'Snowcap'
A small tree, reaching up to 20 x 20 feet, that was developed at the Agricultural Research Station in Beaverlodge, Alberta. Vigorous in habit, reaching up to 11.5 x 9 feet in 5 years.
The leaves, up to 3 inches long, are glossy deep green, turning orange and yellow during autumn.
The abundant, fragrant flowers are pure white.
They are followed by showy, small, red fruits that last into winter.
Hardy zones 2b to 6. Exceptionally hardy, thriving even in Alberta.

'Snowdrift'
A fast growing, dense, rounded, small tree, reaching a maximum size of 25 x 35 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.6 feet.
The elliptic leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are glossy deep green.
The very abundant flowers, up to 1.3 inches across, are pink in bud opening to pure white with yellow stamens.
The abundant, orange to red apples, up to 0.5 inches wide, persist well into winter.
Scab resistant but prone to fire blight.

* photo taken on Jul 18 2017 @ Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, ON


'Sparkler'
A moderately long-lived tree, persisting for up to 60 years or more. It can reach a maximum size of 20 x 25 feet.
The foliage is reddish-green at first turning to medium green. The leaves turn to a mix of yellow and orange-red during autumn.
The flowers are deep pink in bud opening to light pink. They are followed by small, deep red fruits that persist into winter.
Hardy zones 4 to 7.

'Spring Snow'
A fast growing, very dense, strong branched, rounded, upright, medium-sized tree that is a seedling of Malus 'Dolgo'. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; largest on record - 50 x 30 feet; 15 years - 30 x 15 feet. It makes an excellent street tree.
The leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are glossy bright green turning to golden-yellow during autumn.
The fragrant, single, pure white flowers appear over a period lasting up to 3 weeks during late spring.
There are no fruit.
Hardy zones 3 to 8.


* photos taken on Apr 2011 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on Apr 28 2015 in Columbia, MD


'Strathmore'
A broadly-pyramidal to spreading tree, reaching a maximum size of 40 x 30 feet, though very rarely exceeding 20 in height.
The foliage is red during spring turning to reddish-green during summer. The leaves turn to scarlet-red during autumn.
The bright pink flowers are up to 2 inches across.
They are followed by persistent, small, red fruits, up to 1 inch across.
Hardy zones 2 to 6.

'Strawberry Parfait'
A moderate to fast growing, vase-shaped to rounded tree reaching a maximum size of 25 x 28 feet.
The leathery, ovate leaves are up to 3 inches in length. The foliage is red-purple during spring turning deep green in summer.
The large flowers are red in bud, opening to bright pink. They are followed by abundant, deep red berries, up to 0.5 inches across, lasting well into winter.
Hardy zones 4 to 8.

'Sugar Tyme'
A vigorous, rounded to spreading tree reaching a maximum of 22 x 32 feet. Some records include: 15 years - 18 x 15 feet.
The ovate leaves are mid-green, turning to bright yellow during autumn.
The fragrant flowers, up to 1 inch across, are reddish-pink in bud, opening to pure white. They appear over a period lasting up to 3 weeks during late spring.
The abundant, persistent, scarlet-red fruits are up to 0.6 inches wide.
Hardy zones 4 to 7, it is very disease resistant.

* photo taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo taken on Aug 21 2017 in Columbia, MD


'Transcendent'
Medium green foliage. Large red apples.

'Van Eseltine'
A vase-shaped erect tree that reaches up to 25 feet in height. Very narrow in its youth, older trees adopt a more spreading habit. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 ( rarely over 2 ) feet; 20 years - 33 x 10 feet; largest on record - 33 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet.
The leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are glossy bright green.
The very abundant, semi-double flowers, up to 2 inches in width are scarlet red in bud opening to deep pink.
The yellow fruits are flushed red and up to an inch in width.
Hardy zones 2b to 6.

'Veitch Scarlet'
A rounded spreading tree reaching up to 25 feet. Some records include: largest on record - 30 x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 16 inches.
The oval foliage is deep green.
The large white flowers are borne in late spring.
The large fruits are scarlet red.

'Velvet Piller'
An attractive, fast growing, vase-shaped tree, reaching a maximum size of 25 x 26 feet.
The disease resistant foliage is blackish-purple at first, turning to purple-green.
The fragrant flowers are pink.
They are followed by red berries, up to 0.5 inches across.
Hardy zones 4 to 8.

'White Angel'
A rounded tree reaching a maximum of 24 x 32 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot.
The ovate leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are glossy deep green.
The prolific white flowers up to an inch across are pink in bud opening to white.
They are followed by abundant, scarlet-red berries up to 0.7 inches across.
Hardy zones 4 to 7. Extremely disease free.


* photos taken on April 13 2010 in Howard County, MD





'White Cascade'
A fast growing, gracefully weeping tree reaching a maximum size of 30 x 20 ( rarely over 20 ) feet.
The ovate leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are deep green.
The single flowers, up to 1.3 inches across, are pink in bud, opening to pure white.
They are followed by abundant, greenish-yellow fruits, up to 0.5 inches across.
Very disease resistant.

'Winter Gold'
A vase-shaped to spreading tree, reaching up to 30 x 35 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot.
The slightly-lobed leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are bronze at first, turning to mid-green.
The single flowers, up to 1.3 inches wide, are carmine in bud opening to white.
The abundant bright yellow fruits, up to 0.4 inches wide, persist through late winter.
Hardy zones 3 to 7.

3 comments:

  1. Excellent, thoroughly detailed descriptions that are a joy to read.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you!:) Really appreciate your review... I just seen it while re-editing to add Malus brevipes.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi, Do you have these apples? I'm looking for scions/budwood in the future!

    ReplyDelete