Sunday, January 17, 2010

Dipelta

A small genus of shrubs natie to China, that are close relatives of the Weigela.

Dipelta floribunda ( Rosy Dipelta )
This relative of the Weigela is native to central and western China. It forms a vigorous, wide spreading, deciduous large shrub that can be trained as somewhat of a small tree. It can reach up to 20 x 10 feet ( usually half that ) in 10 years and eventually grow to 20 x 17 feet.
The elliptical leaves, up to 7 x 2.5 inches, are luxuriant mid-green. The foliage is early to appear in spring.
The white ( flushed pink and marked yellow inside ), bell-shaped flowers, up to 1.5 x 1.3 inches, are borne in hanging clusters during late spring.
They are followed by papery-winged fruit.
The peeling bark is yellowish-brown.
Hardy from zone 5 to 9 in sun or part shade on moist, fertile, well drained soil. It does not like drought so it should be planted within reach of irrigation.
An excellent large shrub for the eastern and central U.S and Ontario,Canada.
It is propagated from seed in spring as well as softwood cuttings taken in summer.


* photo taken on 4th of July 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photo taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photos taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on Feb 8 2014 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on Apr 24 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


Dipelta yunnanensis ( Yunnan Dipelta )
Also called Dipelta ventricosa. A deciduous large shrub to small tree that is native from southwestern to central China. Some records include: largest on record - 20 x 17 feet.
The finely-toothed, elliptical leaves, are up to 7 x 2 inches in size. The foliage is bronze at first, turning to mid-green above, downy beneath.
The tubular flowers, up to 1 x 1.3 inches in size, are borne in short clusters of 1 to 3 during late spring into early summer. They are lilac-pink outside, pale rose-pink inside with a deep yellow to orange throat.
They are followed by papery winged fruit.
The stems are reddish.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 ( possibly 5 on protected sites ) in sun or part shade on moist, fertile, light, well drained soil. It does not like drought so it should be planted within reach of irrigation.

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