Tuesday, January 12, 2010

Hypericum

A variable genus of close to 400 species ranging from perennials and groundcover shrubs to small trees - nearly all with yellow summer flowers.
Most prefer full sun on well drained soil. Insect pest and disease problems are rare, root rot may occur on poorly drained sites. Propagation is from softwood cuttings during early summer ( non flowering shoots ) which once rooted will need extra protection such as a cold frame or cool greenhouse during their first winter.
Easy to grow, Hypericums are not normally eaten by deer.

* photo of unknown internet source


* photos taken on Oct 22 2013 in Towson, MD
* photos taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photos taken on June 17 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on July 23 2015 in Bayfield, ON


Hypericum addingtonii
An arching, semi-evergreen to evergren shrub, native to southwest China.
Some records include: largest on record - 8 ( rarely over 4.5 ) feet.
It is very similar in appearance and habit to Hypericum leschenaultii.
The blunt-tip, elliptical leaves, up to 3.5 x 1.5 inches, are green.
The golden-yellow flowers, up to 3 inches across, are borne during summer.
Hardy zones 8 to 10

Hypericum aegypticum
A low, spreading, evergren shrub, native to the Mediterranean.
Some records include:
The narrow, oblong leaves, up to 0.5 inches in length, are mid-green.
The leaves are closely spaced.
The bright yellow, star-shaped flowers are borne at the ends of the shoots during spring into summer.
Hardy zones 7 to 9

Hypericum androsaenum ( Balkan Hypericum )
Also called Tutsan. A rapid growing, erect, bushy perennial reaching a maximum size of 4 x 5 feet that is native to western Europe, the Mediterranean through to the Caucasus.
It has become an invasive weed in Australia and New Zealand and should not be planted there.
The oblong leaves are up to 6 x 2.5 inches, are mid-green above, paler green beneath.
The foliage turns to deep red during autumn.
The yellow, star-shaped flowers, up to 0.8 inches wide, are borne in cymes from mid-summer into autumn.
They are followed by oval fruits that are red turning to black.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in full sun to partial shade. It can be grown further north into zone 4 as a perennial rather than shrub. It will regrow from the base during spring if cut back by frost which is almost certain to occur at 0 F. It is very heat tolerant.

* photos taken on May 2 2012 in Columbia, MD
* photo taken on Aug 3 2012 in London, ON

* photos taken on Dec 3 2016 in Columbia, MD


'Albury Purple'
Reaches up to 4 feet in height with purple foliage, otherwise similar to the species.
It may be semi-evergreen in mild climates.

* photo taken on June 7 2012 in Columbia, MD

'Aureum'
Foliage is golden-yellow.

'Glacier'
Reaches up to 3 x 2 feet, with new foliage that is deep green and edged and mottled in silver and pink. The variegation remains at the stem tips through the summer into autumn. It also bears bright yellow flowers during early summer.

'Hypearl Madelon'
Reaches up to 3 feet with bronze new growth that matures to mid blue-green.
The flowers are yellow.
The deep purplish-black stems provide great contrast with the foliage.

* photo taken on Apr 24 2015 in Elkridge, MD


'Variegatum'
Foliage is variegated pink and white.

Hypericum balearicum
A dense, small, evergreen shrub, native to Balearic Islands of Spain. Some records include: largest on record - 6.5 x 6.5 feet.
The leathery, oblong leaves, up to 0.7 inches in length, are deep green.
The solitary, fragrant, golden-yellow, starry flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne during summer.
The twigs are glandular and warty.
Hardy zones 7 to 9

Hypericum beanii
A fast growing, bushy, arching, evergreen shrub, native to Guizhou and Yunnan Provinces in China. Some records include: largest on record - 6.5 x 6.5 feet.
The ovate to elliptic leaves, up to 3.2 inches in length, are mid-green above, pale green beneath.
The godlen-yellow, bowl-shaped flowers, up to 3 inches across, are borne all summer long.
Hardy zones 6 to 10 ( possibly north to zone 4 as a perennial on protected sites )

Hypericum bellum
A rare, dense, rounded, semi-evergreen shrub, native to the Himalayas Some records include: 10 years - 2 x 3.3 feet; largest on record - 5 x 5 feet
The rounded leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are green.
The golden-yellow, cup-shaped flowers, up to 2.3 inches across, are borne during summer.
Hardy zones 6 to 9

Hypericum brachyphyllum
A small shrub, native to the southeastern U.S. ( Louisiana to Georgia; south to Florida ). Some records include: largest on record - 5 x 5 feet.
The needle-like leaves, up to 0.5 inches in length, are rich mid-green.
The yellow ( red in bud ) flowers, up to 0.5 inches across, are borne during summer.
The stems are winged.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 in full sun on moist, acidic, well drained soil. It is tolerant of swampy sites.

Hypericum buckleyi ( Blue Ridge Hypericum )
A fast growing groundcover shrub reaching a maximum size of 1.5 x 4 feet ( usually under 1 foot in height ), that is native to mountains in the eastern U.S. from Georgia to North Carolina. Thrives in England where it is an excellent landscape plant.
The oblong leaves, up to an inch in length, are rich blue-green.
The golden-yellow flowers are up to an inch across.
Hardy zones 5 to 8

* historic archive photo


Hypericum calycinum ( Creeping St. Johns Wort )
A fast spreading to invasive groundcover shrubby perennial, reaching up to 2 x 10+ feet, that is native from Bulgaria to Turkey. It is typically planted around 2 to 2.5 feet apart for fast cover when used as groundcover on commercial plantings. Some records include: 10 years - 2 x 10 feet. It spreads by rhizomes and self-rooting, which makes it a great choice for stabilizing steep slopes. It can spread up to 2 feet or more per year.
The deer resistant foliage is evergreen in mild climates, though in cold climates the foliage will typically dry up around Christmas.
The oblong leaves, up to 4.3 inches in length, are deep green above, pale green beneath.
The bright yellow flowers, up to 4 ( rarely over 3 ) inches across, are borne mid-summer to mid-autumn.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 ( possibly 4 as a perennial if mulched ) in full sun to partial shade on light, well drained soil. Very tolerant of heat, dry shade and drought and easy to grow, even competing well with tree roots. Deer resistant.
Hypericum calycinum should be moved every 1 to 2 years in March for fresher appearance ( mow every year in harsher climates where it is deciduous ).
Propagation is from semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer, seed sown during autumn or division also during autumn.

* photo taken on May 8 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photos taken on July 13 2011 in Columbia, MD


* photo taken on June 29 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 16 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Apr 2 2017 in Annapolis, MD

* photos taken on May 17 2017 in Annapolis, MD


'Brigadoon'
Spring foliage is bright yellow, later turning to lime-green.

* photo taken on May 6 2010 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photos taken on Aug 25 2011 @ Scott Arboretum, Swarthmore, PA

* photos taken on Sep 23 2013 in Burtonsville, MD


'Carnival'
The stems as well as the young foliage is pinkish, later turning to deep green and boldly edged in deep yellow.
It is otherwise similar to the species.

Hypericum canariense
A upright to spreading, large shrub to small tree, that is native to the Canary Islands. Some records include: largest on record - 17 feet. It may become invasive in Hawaii.
The pointed, oblong leaves, up to 3 x 0.7 inches, are green above, pale green beneath.
The golden-yellow, starry flowers are borne during summer.
Hardy zones 9 to 10

Hypericum cerastioides
A shrubby, mat-forming perennial, reaching up to 1 x 1.5 + feet, that is native to southeastern Europe ( from Bulgaria to Greece and Turkey ).
The ovate leaves, up to 1.3 inches in length, are downy, gray-green.
Up to Up to 5 golden-yellow flowers, up to 1.5 inches wide, are borne on cymes during late spring into early summer.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 in full sun on sandy, well drained soils. Propagation is from division during autumn or early spring.

Hypericum chapmanii ( Spongebark Hypericum )
An evergreen shrub to spreading small tree, reaching a maximum height of 13 feet, that is native to bogs and wet pineland in northwest Florida. It is endangered in the wild. Some records include: largest on record - trunk diameter of 6 inches.
The linear leaves, up to 1 x 0.1 inches in size, are borne in pairs or whorls.
The bright yellow flowers are borne from the leaf axils during summer.
The spongy bark is up to 0.8 inches thick.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 on moist, acidic, sandy soil.

* excellent photo link
http://eol.org/pages/486514/overview

Hypericum coris
A dense, erect, small evergreen shrub, reaching a maximum size of 16 x 16 inches, that is native from the European Alps to central Italy. In colder climates, it becomes a woody based perennial rather than shrub. Some records include: 10 years - 16 x 16 inches.
The narrow, whorled, heather-like leaves, up to 1 inch in length, are gray-green ( blue-green beneath ) and borne in whorls.
The flowers, up to 0.8 inches across, are borne in clusters of up to 20 during mid to late summer.
Hardy zones 7 to 9, likes limey soil.

Hypericum densiflorum ( Dense Hypericum )
A medium-sized shrub native to bogs & open swamps in the eastern U.S. ( from Missouri to Long Island, NY; south to eastern Texas to Georgia ). Some records include: largest on record - 10 x 6 ( rarely over 4 ) feet. It can be an aggressive spreader on some sites.
The oblanceolate leaves are up to 2 inches in length, are deep green above, bluish beneath.
The golden-yellow flowers, up to 0.7 inches across, are borne on dense, small, flat-topped clusters from mid-summer to early autumn.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 ( possibly 4b...thriving in Ottawa, Ontario ) in full sun on moist to wet soil.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photo


Hypericum empetrifolium
A dense, creeping, evergreen, groundcover shrub, native to western Asia. Some records include: largest on record - 2 x 3 feet.
The heather-like leaves, up to 0.5 inches in length, green.
The flowers, up to 0.8 inches across, are borne during summer.
Hardy zones 4 to 7

'Prostratum'
A very low growing, groundcover shrub, reaching a maximum size of 4 inches x 3 feet.

Hypericum fasciculatum ( Sand-Weed )
A dense, small evergreen shrub, native to swamps of the southeastern U.S. from Mississippi to North Carolina; south to Florida.
Some records include: largest on record - 3 x 3 feet. It is very unique among Hypericums, instead resembling groundcover Juniper ( a more interesting version of ) in appearance.
The needle-like, juniper-like leaves are glossy deep green.
The yellow flowers, up to 0.7 inches across, are borne late spring to early autumn.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 in full sun on acidic, well drained soil.

Hypericum forrestii
Also called Hypericum patulum forrestii.
A bushy, deciduous to semi-evergreen shrub, native to sw Sichuan & nw Yunnan Provinces in China, south into northeast Burma. Some records include: 4 years - 6.5 feet; 10 years - 6.5 x 6.5 feet; largest on record - 7 x 6.5 feet. Older plants are often shaped like a miniature tree.
The leaves, up to 3.2 inches in length, are mid-green above, pale green beneath.
The foliage turns to orange and red very late in autumn.
The golden-yellow, saucer-shaped flowers, up to 2.5 inches across, are borne in clusters of up to 20 from summer into autumn. They are followed by bronze-red fruits.
Hardy zones 5 to 9

Hypericum frondosum ( Shrubby St. John's Wort )
A handsome, moderate growing, erect, deciduous shrub, reaching around 5 feet, that is native to southeastern U.S. ( from southern Indiana and Kentucky to central North Carolina; south to far eastern Texas to northwest Florida to central Georgia ). It is endangered in Georgia and the Carolinas, extinct in the wild in Indiana. Some records include: largest on record - 9 x 6 feet. Older plants are often shaped like a mini tree.
The oblong leaves, up to 3.2 inches in length, are blue-green above, pale powdery blue beneath.
The golden-yellow flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne in clusters of up to 7 from early summer through mid-autumn. The flowers have very showy golden-yellow stamens.
The attractive peeling bark is reddish in color.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 ( 4 as a perennial on protected sites - mulch during winter north of zone 6 ) in full sun on well drained soil. Very clay and drought tolerant. Prune lightly after first flush of blooms to encourage repeat blooming.

* photos taken on Aug 25 2011 @ Scott Arboretum, Swarthmore, PA


* photo taken @ Smithsonian Inst, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014



'Sunburst'
Reaches a maximum size of 5 x 10 feet, bearing large showy golden-yellow flowers, up to 2 inches across.

* photo taken on July 4 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photo taken on June 30 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photo taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA


Hypericum galioides ( Bedstraw St Johnswort )
A low groundcover shrub, native to coastal southeastern U.S. from eastern Texas to North Carolina. Some records include: largest on record - 4 x 5 ( rarely over 2 x 3.5 ) feet.
The fine-textured, narrow, oblanceolate leaves, up to 2 inches in length, are glossy deep green. The foliage is similar to that of Rosmarinus.
The abundant, golden-yellow flowers, up to 0.7 inches across, are borne during early to mid summer.
The attractive exfoliating bark is rusty-orange.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on moist, acidic, well drained soil. Drought tolerant.

* historic archive photo


'Brodie'
An excellent groundcover form. Some records include: 6 years - 3 x 6 feet; largest on record - 3 x 7 feet ( though is frequently closer to 1 foot in height ).

* photos taken on Aug 20 2011 in Wheaton, MD


'Creel's Gold Star'
Exceptionally vigorous, reaching up to 5 x 5 feet in 10 years, forming a dense, rounded to domed shrub. It is otherwise similar to the species.

Hypericum henryi
A medium-sized shrub, native from the Himalayas to southeast Asia. Some records include: 3 years - 6 feet; largest on record - 10 x 6 feet.
The elliptical leaves, up to 1.7 inches, are mid-green.
The yellow flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne during summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 9

Hypericum 'Hidcote'
The hybrid betwen Hypericum calycinum & H. cyathiflorum 'Gold Cup'; forming a dense, compact, semi-evergreen to evergreen shrub. Some records include: 10 years - 6.5 x 8 feet; largest on record - 7 x 8 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are deep blue-green above, pale green beneath.
The abundant, deep yellow, bowl-shaped flowers, up to 3.5 inches across, are borne over a long season from mid-summer to late autumn.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on sandy, well drained soil.
May die back to ground during severe winters, just cut back damaged wood and it will resprout vigorously from the base during spring.
Propagation is from semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer or seed sown during autumn. Prone to root rot in the Deep South. Young growth may be damaged by late frosts in some regions.

* photo taken on June 7 2012 in Odenton, MD
* photos taken on June 23 2016 in Columbia, MD


Hypericum hookerianum
An upright to spreading, evergreen shrub, native to the Himalayas from India to western China. Some records include: largest on record - 12 feet.
The narrow leaves, up to 4 x 1.7 inches, are green.
The golden-yellow, bowl-shaped flowers, up to 2.5 inches across, are borne throughout summer.
Hardy zones 7 to 10

Hypericum hypericoides
A small shrub, native to the southeastern U.S. from Oklahoma to Virginia; south to Texas to Florida. Some records include: largest on record - 5 feet
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 1.5 inches in length, are green.
The yellow flowers, up to 1 inches across, are borne during summer.
Hardy zones 6 to 9

* photo taken by Robert H. Mohlenbrock @ USDA SCS. 1991. Southern wetland flora


Hypericum x inodorum
A natural hybrid between Hypericum androsaemum & H. hircinum, originating in the northwest Mediterranean region in Europe, forming an arching, medium-sized, deciduous to semi-evergreen shrub reaching a maximum size of 7 x 7 feet. Some records include: 10 years - 5 x 6.5 feet.
The aromatic, broadly oval leaves, up to 4.5 inches, are deep green.
The profuse, scentless, yellow, star-shaped flowers, up to 1.3 inches across, are borne mid summer to mid autumn. They are followed by orange-red, fleshy, oval capsules.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on well drained soil. Remove dead wood during spring. Propagation is from semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer.

'Elmstead'
Bushy and upright in habit, reaching a maximum size of 5 x 7 feet.
The flowers are large and bright yellow.
Bright pinkish-red fruits.
Foliage may be prone to rust.

* photos taken on Oct 22 2013 in Towson, MD


'Hysan'
The foliage is variegated yellow.

Hypericum kalmianum
A very leafy, dense, small, evergreen shrub, native to the Great Lakes ( from Duluth, Minnesota to Michigan's Upper Peninsula to Manitoulin Island around the northern shore of Georgian Bay to Ottawa, Ontario to southeast Quebec; south to northern Illinois to northern Ohio to Buffalo, New York ). In Ontario, it is especially abundant on the Bruce Peninsula and Long Point but absent from the Haliburton highlands. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was locally abundant on the Lake Erie islands during the 1800s. It also occurred locally in a large population at Castalia Prairie on the Ohio shore at that time. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; 10 years - 4 x 6 feet; largest on record - 4 x 6 feet.
The leathery, narrow oblong leaves, up to 2.5 x 0.3 inches in size, are blue-green above, paler beneath. The foliage turns to yellow and orange during autumn.
The golden-yellow, saucer-shaped flowers, up to 1.6 inches across, are borne in cymes all summer long.
The bark is reddish and peeling.
Hardy zones 2 to 7 in full sun on just about any well drained soil, though preferrably sandy.

* photos taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* historic archive photo

* photo taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Ames'
Fast growing, reaching up to 3 x 5 feet.

'Blues Festival'

* photo taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Deppe'
Also called 'Sunny Boulevard'. Very dense in habit, reaching up to 3.3 x 4 feet, bearing abundant golden-yellow flowers mid-summer to early autumn.
The foliage is similar to that of the species but is darker than 'Ames'.

* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on on July 18 2014 in Columbia, MD


'Gemo'
A low, compact form, reaching only 3 x 3 feet in size. It originates in Denmark.
The foliage is deep blue-green, turning golden-yellow very late in autumn. The very abundant golden-yellow flowers are borne mid-summer to early autumn.
Hardy zones 4 to 7.

* photos taken on July 16 2016 in Goderich, ON

* photo taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery


Hypericum kouytchense
Also called Hypericum patulum var. grandiflorum. A bushy, arching, medium-sized, semi-evergreen shrub, native to Guizhou Province in China. Some records include: 10 years - 6 x 5 feet; largest on record - 6 x 6 feet.
The oval leaves, up to 3.2 x 1 inches, are deep blue-green above, paler beneath. The foliage often turns to deep purple during late autumn, persisting on the plants until temperatures drop below 10 F.
The abundant, golden-yellow, starry flowers, up to 3 inches across, are borne in clusters of up to 11 from mid-summer into mid autumn, lasting 2.5 months or sometimes more. The golden-yellow stamens are very showy.
The flowers are followed by red fruits.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on fertile, well drained soil. It is more wood hardy north of zone 7 than H.'Hidcote'.
Propagation is from semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer or seed sown during autumn.

Hypericum lancasteri
A deciduous shrub, native to southern Sichuan and northern Yunnan Provinces in China. Some records include: largest on record - 3.5 x 3.5 feet.
The oblong leaves, up to 2.5 inches in length, are purplish-red at first, turning to mid-green above, white beneath.
The yellow, bowl-shaped flowers, up to 2.5 inches across, are borne in clusters of up to 11 during summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 9

Hypericum leschenaultii
A bushy spreading, evergreen shrub, native to high mountains of Indonesia. Some records include: largest on record - 14 feet.
The ovate leaves, up to 3.5 x 1.7 inches, are green above, bluish-white beneath.
The deep golden-yellow, saucer-shaped flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne in clusters of up to 10 during summer.
Hardy zones 9 to 11, known to grow in England in an unheated greenhouse at Kew.

Hypericum lissophloeus ( Smooth-barked St. Johnswort )
An upright, airy, Asparagus-like, upright, evergreen shrub, reaching up to 13 ( averaging 5 ) x 4 feet, that is native to swampy sites in northern Florida.
The needle-like leaves, up to 1 inch in length, are gray-green.
The flowers, up to 0.5 inches across, are bright yellow.
The bark is attractive coppery-orange colored.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 in full sun on sandy, well drained soil.

Hypericum lloydii ( Sandhill Hypericum )
A stoloniferous groundcover shrub, reaching up to 14 inches x 3 feet, that is native to dry, sandy or rocky pine forests from Alabama to North Carolina.
Some records include: largest on record - 2 x 4 feet.
The aromatic, needle-like leaves, up to 0.4 inches in length, are deep green in summer, turning to bronze during winter.
The yellow flowers, up to 0.3 inches across, are borne late summer to mid-autumn.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 in full sun on sandy, well drained soil.

* photos taken by Doug Goldman @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Hypericum longystylum
A rounded, medium-sized, deciduous shrub, native to eastern China.
Some records include: largest on record - 6 x 8 feet
The narrowly-oblong leaves, up to 1.3 x 0.6 inches, are bright green.
The flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne
Hardy zones 7 to 8.

* photos taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


Hypericum maclarenii
A small, bushy, upright to spreading, semi-evergreen shrub, native to China.
Some records include: largest on record -
The narrow, lance-shaped leaves, up to 1.7 inches in length, are green above, blue-green beneath.
The golden-yellow flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne during summer.
Hardy zones 7 to 9

Hypericum monogynum ( Chinese St. Johns Wort )
Also called Hypericum chinense.
A semi-evergreen shrub, native to southeast China and Taiwan.
Some records include: largest on record - 5 x 5 feet.
The elliptic leaves, up to 5 inches in length, are green.
The golden-yellow flowers, up to 2.5 inches across, are borne in clusters of up to 30 during summer. They are followed by red fruit capsules.
Hardy zones 8 to 10

Hypericum x moserianum
A fast growing, low, spreading, arching, deciduous perennial to evergreen ( zone 8 + ) shrub depending on climate. Some records include: 10 years - 3 x 4 feet; largest on record - 3 x 4 feet. It makes an excellent groundcover.
The leaves, up to 2.8 inches in length, are deep green.
The golden-yellow flowers, up to 3.2 inches across, are borne mid summer into autumn.
The stems are reddish.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on just about any well drained soil. Cut to near ground level during early spring before new growth begins.

* photo taken on 4th of July 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


'Tricolor'
Compact in habit, reaching up to 2 x 5 feet.
The attractive foliage is edged in pink and white.

* photo taken on May 17 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken Sep 13 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Sep 24 2013 in Howard Co., MD

* photo taken on July 11 2014 in Washington, DC


Hypericum nitidum
A fast growing shrub, reaching a maximum size of 2 x 3 feet.
It becomes deciduous at temperatues below 6 F.
The linear leaves, up to inches, are green.
The flowers, up to inches across, are borne
Hardy zones 6 to 9

Hypericum oblongifolium
A spreading to weeping, medium-sized shrub, native to the western Himalayas. Some records include: largest on record - 10 feet.
The oblong leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are mid-green above, paler green beneath. In foliage and bloom; it is very similar in appearance to that of Hypericum calycinum.
The yellowish-orange, star-shaped flowers, up to 3 inches across, are borne during summer.
Hardy zones 8 to 10

Hypericum olympicum ( Olympia St Johns-Wort )
A moderate growing, deciduous, bushy, erect, groundcover shrub, native from the southern Balkans to Greece and Turkey. Some records include: largest on record - 22 inches x 3 feet. It makes a great plant or the small garden or rock garden.
The oblong leaves, up to 1.7 inches in length, are gray-green above, blue-white beneath.
The golden-yellow, star-shaped flowers, up to 2.5 inches across, are borne in clusters of up to 5 during late spring into summer.
Hardy zones 4 to 9, in full sun to partial shade on sandy, well drained soil, it becomes a perennial in colder climates. Easy to grow. Propagation is from seed or green cuttings taken during summer.

* photo of unknown internet source


Hypericum olympicum uniflora ( Hypericum polyphyllum )
Reaching up to 8 inches in height. Hardy north to zone 4

Hypericum patulum
A bushy, spreading, semi-evergreen shrub, native to Sichuan and northern Guizhou Provinces in China. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 7 feet; largest on record - 7 x 10 feet. It can be used as an informal hedge to line walkways.
The leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are deep green above, whitish beneath. The foliage turns bright orange to red during autumn.
The golden-yellow, bowl-shaped flowers, up to 2.5 inches across, are borne during summer into early autumn.
Hardy zones 6 to 10 ( zones 5b as a perennial ) in full sun to partial shade. Drought and clay tolerant.

'Sungold'
More compact than species, reaching up to 3 x 5 feet.
Very large, up to 2.5 inch wide, bright yellow flowers borne all summer long.
Hardy zone 4 to 9

Hypericum perforatum ( St. John's Wort )
A stoloniferous perennial, reaching up to 4 x 2 feet, that is native to temperate regions of Europe that is grown commercially as a medication for Depression. It is naturalized in eastern North America to as far north as Chapleau, Ontario.
The oppositely-arranged, sessile, narrowly-oblong leaves, up to 2 x 0.3 ( rarely over 1.3 ) inches in size, are mid-green.
The yellow to orangish-yellow flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are borne on cymes from early summer into early autumn.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 in full sun on sandy, well drained soil. It is extremely heat and drought tolerant. Propagation is from division during autumn or early spring.

* photos taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on July 14 2016 in Tobermory, ON

* photo taken on July 16 in Bayfield, ON

* photo taken by Jennifer Anderson @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Hypericum polyphyllum 'Grandiflorum'
A vigorous spreading groundcover shrub, reaching up to 1.5 x 2+ feet. Great for use as edging and trailing over walls.
The small, finely-textured leaves are mid-green.
The golden-yellow flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne during summer.
Hardy zone 5 to 9 in full sun to partial shade.

Hypericum prolificum ( Shrubby St Johnswort )
A loose, medium-size shrub native to sandy open woods and prairies in eastern North America ( from southwest Iowa to far southeast Minnesota to northern Wisconsin to central Michigan to the north shore of Lake Erie to Buffalo, New York to southern Maine; south to eastern Texas to northern Georgia ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant around Windsor during the 1800s and remains a rare resident at the Ojibway Prairie. It was also common at Detroit, Michigan during that time. Historically it was also found around London and Kitchener, Ontario. Some records include: largest on record - 8 x 6 feet. It is endangered in Minnesota, Ontario, New York State, New Jersey and Delaware.
The narrow, oblong to elliptical leaves are up to 3 x 0.5 inches, are glossy deep blue-green.
The golden-yellow flowers are up to 1.3 inches across, borne all summer long.
The shaggy bark is light brown.
Hardy zones 3 to 8, it thrives on any dry soil in sun to partial shade. It is both heat and drought tolerant.

* photos taken on June 19 2010 in Silver Spring, MD


* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photo taken on Oct 2 2016 in Howard Co., MD

* historic archive photo


Hypericum pseudohenryi
An erect to arching shrub, native to central Sichuan and northern Yunnan Province in China. Some records include: largest on record - 6 x 7 feet.
The leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are deep green above, pale whitish-green beneath.
The golden-yellow, star-shaped flowers, up to 2.3 inches across, are borne during summer. They are followed by red fruits.
Hardy zones 5 to 9

Hypericum punctatum ( Spotted St. John's Wort )
A rhizomatous perennial, reaching up to 4 ( rarely over 2.5 ) feet in height, that is native to eastern North America ( from central Minnesota to northern Michigan to Nova Scotia; south to central Texas to central Florida ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it occurred sporadically around Point Pelee, the Lake Erie islands as well as the Ohio shore during the 1800s.
The oppositely-arranged, sessile, smooth-edged, narrow-oblong leaves, up to 3.2 x 1 inches in size, are smooth and mid-green.
The bright yellow flowers, up to 0.5 inches wide, are borne mid to late summer.
The stems are often red.
It thrives in full sun to partial shade on sandy or gravelly, well drained soil.

* photo taken by Robert H. Mohlenbrock @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Hypericum reductum ( Atlantic St. Johnswort )
A stoloniferous, evergreen groundcover shrub, reaching up to 14 inches x 3 feet, that is native to sandy scrubby sites from Alabama to North Carolina; south to Florida. Some records include: largest on record - 2 x 4 feet.
The aromatic, needle-like leaves, up to 0.4 inches in length, are deep green in summer, turning to bronze during winter.
The yellow flowers, up to 0.7 inches across, are borne early summer to early autumn.
Hardy zones 7b to 9 in full sun on sandy, well drained soil.

'Kilamajaro'
A very low form, reaching a maximum size of 4 inches x 3 feet, making an excellent groundcover. Hardy zones 7 to 9

Hypericum repens
A moderate growing, low, deciduous, groundcover shrub. Some records include: largest on record - 6 inches x 3.3+ feet.
The narrow leaves are green.
The golden-yellow flowers are borne during early summer.
Hardy zones 8 to 9

Hypericum reptans
A low, mat-forming, evergreen, groundcover shrub, native to the Himalayas. Some records include: 10 years - 8 inches x 3 feet; largest on record - 8 inches x 5 feet.
The rounded, green leaves, up to 0.7 inches in length, are green, turning to red during autumn.
The solitary, golden-yellow flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne during summer.
The flowers are scarlet-red in bud.
Hardy zones 7 to 9

Hypericum revolutum ( Tree St. Johnswort )
A small, evergreen tree, native to high mountains in the southern Arabian Peninsula, through tropical eastern Africa south into South Africa. Some records include: largest on record - 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot.
The leaves, up to 2.5 x 0.5 inches, are green.
The orange-yellow flowers, up to 3 inches across, are borne in loose groups at the branch tips during summer.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 in full sun on well drained soil. Rarely bothered by pests or disease.

Hypericum rhodopeum
A low, mat-forming, evergreen, groundcover shrub, native from southeast Europe to western Asia.
Some records include: 10 years - 8 x 20 inches; largest on record - 1 foot x 20 inches.
The hairy, oval leaves are green.
The flowers, up to 1.6 inches across, are borne late spring into early summer.
Hardy zones 6 to 9. Easy to grow in sandy, well drained soil.

Hypericum 'Rowallane'
A fast growing, graceful, medium-sized, semi-evergreen shrub.
Some records include: 5 years - 6 feet; 10 years - 10 x 8 feet; largest on record - 12 x 8 feet.
The oblong leaves, up to 3.5 inches in length, are deep green above, paler green beneath.
The rich golden-yellow flowers, up to 4 inches across, are borne in small clusters over a long season from late summer into autumn.
Hardy zones 6 to 10. In cool climates, it is best planted against a sunny south facing wall. It becomes a perennial, regrowing from its roots, if cut back by frost.

Hypericum stellatum
A spreading shrub, native to northeast Sichuan in China.
Some records include: largest on record - 10 x 10 feet.
The narrow oblong leaves, up to 2.3 inches in length, are green.
The golden-yellow, starry flowers, up to 1.7 inches across, are borne in lax clusters at the branch tips during summer.
Hardy zones 6 to 9

Hypericum subsessile
A bushy, arching, evergreen shrub, native to Sichuan and Yunnan Provinces in China. Some records include: largest on record - 6 x 7 feet.
The stalkless, narrow elliptic leaves, up to 2.5 x 1.7 inches, are green above, powdery-white beneath.
The golden-yellow, star-shaped flowers, up to 2.3 inches across, are borne during summer. They are followed by red fruits.
Hardy zones 7 to 10

Hypericum tetrapelatum ( Four Petal Hypericum )
An attractive, evergreen shrub, reaching around 2 feet, that is native to the southeastern U.S. from southeastern Georgia to central Florida. Some records include: largest on record - 3 x 3 feet.
The small cordate leaves are glaucous blue-green.
The yellow flowers, up to 1 inches across, are borne from spring through autumn.
Hardy zones 8 to 9. Flood tolerant and found on low, moist sites in the wild.

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