Wednesday, January 20, 2010

Dicentra / Bleeding Hearts

A genus of mostly spring blooming perennials, that are part of the large Fumariaceae family. They mostly prefer climates with cool to cold winters and partial shade on moist, cool, peaty, well drained soil. Propagation is from division during autumn or spring and seed.
These plants are generally NOT eaten by deer, insect pests or disease do not normally occor. However it slugs do attack, they can be treated by sprinkling Diotomacous Earth around the plant.


* photo taken on Jul 17 2017 in Ottawa, ON


Dicentra 'Bacchanal'
A rhizomatous spreading hybrid originating from the Netherlands, reaching up to 1.5 x 2.5 feet. The ferny bright green foliage contrasts well with the deep red flowers which are borne from late spring until first autumn frost.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial shade.

Dicentra 'Burning Hearts'
A low growing, dense, compact, mounding perennial, reaching a maximum size of 15 inches x 1.5 feet.
The very attractive, delicate, fernlike foliage is intensely gray-blue. The foliage remains healthy throughout the growing season.
The profuse, fragrant, large, vibrant red flowers are borne continuously over a very long season ( up to 5+ months ) from spring to autumn. Remove old blooms to encourage continuous blooming.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial to full shade on moist, humus-rich, well drained soil.
Plant during late summer into autumn.

Dicentra canadensis ( Squirrels Corn )
A rhizomatous, low perennial, reaching up to 1 foot, that is native to cool, rich, upland woods in eastern North America ( from central Minnesota to Michigan's Upper Peninsula to Tobermory, Ontario to Haliburton, Ontario to southern Quebec, Maine and Nova Scotia; south to southwest Missouri to far northern Georgia to central Virginia ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was locally common around Windsor during the 1800s. It occurred sporadically during that time on the Ohio shore.
The triangular, bipinnate leaves, up to 12 x 7 ( rarely over 10 ) inches, are divided into elliptical lobed leaflets. The foliage is blue-green. This Dicentra goes dormant during the summer.
The fragrant, white flowers, up to 0.7 x 0.3 inches, are borne mid to late spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 on moist acidic soil.

* photo of unknown internet source


Dicentra chrysantha ( Golden Ear-drops )
A perennial, reaching a maximum size of 5 x 1.5 feet, that is native to dry arroyos from central California to the Baja Peninsula.
The bipinnate leaves, up to 18 x 7 inches, are blue-green or mid-green.
The golden-yellow flowers, up to 0.5 inches long, are borne mid summer to early autumn.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 in partial to medium shade and preferring moist, acidic soil, it is very drought tolerant due to its deep taproot.

Dicentra culcullaria ( Dutchman's Breeches )
A low growing, rhizome spreading perennial, forming dense mats, reaching a maximum size of 16 x 40 inches though rarely over 1 x 1 foot. It is native to rich woodlands and floodplains in North America ( from far southeast Manitoba to Thunder Bay, Ontario to to Batchewana, Ontario to Petawawa, Ontario to Gaspe to Cape Breton, Nova Scotia; south to eastern Oklahoma to far northern Georgia to central North Carolina ). It is also native in the west in Washington, Oregon and Idaho. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it occurred sporadically along the Canard River Valley, around Point Pelee and the Lake Erie islands during the 1800s. It was abundant on the Ohio shore during that time. It was considered to be abundant at Detroit during that time.
The bipinnate leaves, up to 15 x 7 ( rarely over 10 ) inches, are composed of deeply incised, lobed, elliptical leaves. The pale blue-green foliage quickly dies down after flowering and the plant becomes summer dormant.
The double spurred, yellow ( tipped white ) flowers, up to 1 inches, are borne on nodding racemes, during mid to late spring.
Hardy zones 2 to 6 in partial to full shade on cool, peaty, moist, well drained soil.

* photo taken on March 28 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


* photo of unknown internet source

* photo taken by Jennifer Anderson @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on Apr 17 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on Apr 14 2017 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD

* photo taken on Apr 28 2017 in Ellicott City, MD

* historic archive photo


Dicentra eximea ( Fringed Bleeding Heart )
A rapid spreading, rhizomatous, clump forming perennial, reaching a maximum size of 3 x 4 ( rarely over 2 ) feet, that is native to rich moist woods of eastern North America ( from eastern Ohio to Vermont; south to Georgia...not on coastal plain south of northern Virginia ). It is endangered in the wild in Pennsylvania and New Jersey and threatened in Maryland.
Each plant forms up to 10 delicate, ferny, triangular basal leaves, up to 16 inches in length. The leaves are composed of many elliptical, gray-green leaves.
It may go dormant early during summer drought but may also be almost evergreen in climates with mild winters and cool, moist summers.
The light pink to reddish-pink flowers, up to 0.8 inches across, are borne profusely mid to late spring, then sporadically until autumn frosts. The flowers attract butterflies and hummingbirds.
Hardy zone 2 to 7 in partial to full shade on moist, fertile, well drained soil.
Heat tolerant.

* photos taken on Aug 4 2011 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on April 20 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on April 27 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 2 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA


'Adrian Bloom'
Vigorous in habit, with leaves up to 20 inches in length.
The reddish stems bear mid-green foliage. The flowers are red.

'Alba'
Bright green foliage and pure white flowers.

'Aurora'
A vigorous rhizomatous spreader, forming a clump up to 3 x 4 feet, with blue-green ferny leaves up to 22 x 12 inches. The small white flowers are borne spring through summer.

* photo taken on May 14 2012 in Howard Co., MD


'Bountiful'
A rhizome spreading perennial with mid-green leaves up to 20 inches in length.
The purplish-pink flowers borne spring then repeating during summer are much larger than that of the species.
The stems are reddish.

'Coldham'
Ferny bluish foliage and deep red flowers.

'Dolly Sodds'
Similar to 'Stuart Boothman' but more heat tolerant with good performance even at 75+ days of over 90 F.

'Margary Fish'
Finely divided, blue-gray foliage contrasts with large, pure white flowers.

'Spring Morning'
A rhizomatous spreading, clumping perennial with deep green leaves up to 20 inches in length. The deep pink flowers are borne late in the season.

'Stuart Boothman'
A vigorous rhizomatous spreader, forming a clump up to 3 x 3.5 feet ( width up to 3 feet in 3 years ), with attractive powdery-blue foliage.
The deep pink flowers are borne late spring through late summer.

'Zestful'
Grayish-green foliage and deep rose-pink flowers borne over a long season.

Dicentra formosana ( Western Bleeding Heart )
A vigorous, rhizomatous, low growing, mounding, perennial, reaching a maximum size of 3 x 3.5 feet ( very rarely over 2 feet ), that is native to moist forests in western North America ( from Vancouver Island to Prince George, British Columbia to far northeast Washington State; south to central California to southwest Idaho ).
The leaves, up to 22 x 14 inches, are glaucous blue-gray.
The small, purplish-pink flowers, up to 0.6 inches, are borne in dense racemes ( up to 30 flowers each ) over a long season from late spring into late summer. The flowers attract butterflies and hummingbirds.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 ( 2 if mulched on a protected site ) in partial shade on moist, humus-rich, well drained soil. Drought tolerant ( more so than Dicentra eximea ).

'Adrian Bloom'
Very attractive and vigorous form with deep green foliage and deep reddish-pink blooms.

'Langtrees'
Powdery-blue foliage and white flowers.

'Luxuriant'
Strong growing, reaching up to 3 x 3.5 feet with ferny deep blue-green foliage and large deep pink to red flowers borne over a very long season from late spring through early autumn.

* photos taken on May 7 2012 in Ellicott City, MD


* photos taken on May 26 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on July 17 2012 in Ellicott City, MD

'Pearl Drops'
A vigorous spreading, rhizomatous perennial, with silvery blue-gray leaves, up to 12 inches in length.
The large flowers are white and flushed with pink.

'Snowdrift'
Reaches up to 2 x 3.5 feet with ferny foliage and white flowers borne over a very long season.

'Snowflakes'
Vigorous and upright, with green foliage and hanging pure white flowers.

Dicentra 'King of Hearts'
A complex hybrid of Dicentra peregria & ( Dicentra formosana 'oregana' x D. eximea ).
It forms a dwarf clump, up to 1.5 x 2 feet, with finely-cut blue leaves, up to 12 inches in length. This Dicentra does not go summer dormant.
The very abundant, reddish-pink, heart-shaped flowers are borne all season long.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial shade. Very heat / humidity tolerant and disease resistant, it even thrives in southern Georgia.

Dicentra macrantha ( Yellow Bleeding Heart )
A perennial native to moist to wet woodlands in eastern China, forming a clump, up to 2 x 5 feet.
The leaves, up to 18 inches in length, are composed of coarsely-toothed leaflets. The foliage is very attractive.
The flowers are yellow.
Hardy zones 4 to 7 in partial shade on moist, sandy or humus-rich soil. It is not very wind, heat and humidity tolerant.

Dicentra peregrina
A very low-growing perennial, reaching up to 5 inches, that is native to far eastern Russia and northern Japan.
The very attractive, deeply-cut, linear-lobed foliage is gray-green.
The pinkish-purple flowers, up to 1 inch, are borne during mid to late summer. Flower color varies in the Pacific Islands as in Kamchatka it is red and in the Kuril Islands the flowers are white.
Hardy zones 4 to 7 in partial shade on moist, sandy, well drained soil. It does not enjoy hot summers.

* photo of unknown internet source


Dicentra scandens
A vigorous, tendril climbing, perennial vine, reaching a maximum height of 12 feet, that is native from the Himalayas to western China.
Excellent for use on fences on the woodland garden.
The deeply-lobed leaves are up to 14 inches in length. The foliage is mid-green.
The very profuse, white to yellow flowers are borne mid spring to mid autumn. The flowers are loved by hummingbirds.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in partial to medium shade on moist, acidic, fertile, well drained soil.

'Athens Yellow'
More vigorous with very profuse yellow flowers borne continuously over a long season.

Dicentra spectabilis ( Common Bleeding Heart )
A vigorous, bushy mounding perennial, reaching a maximum size of 5 x 5 feet ( typically 3 x 3 feet ) that is native to woodlands in Manchuria and Korea. In hot climates, it often goes dormant by late summer.
The coarse divided leaves, up to 16 inches in length, somewhat resemble that of the Peony.
The foliage is glaucous blue-gray.
The foliage burns and dies back by late summer in full sun.
The rosy-red ( with protruding white inner petals ) flowers, up to 1 inch in length, are borne in long racemes of up to 15 during late spring into early summer. The flowers attract butterflies and hummingbirds.
Hardy zone 2 to 8 in partial shade on moist, fertile, acidic, well drained soil. It is extremely cold hardy; thriving at least as far north as Grande Prairie in Alberta. Easy to grow in moist, sandy soil in woods. In cool summer regions, cut back to around 5 inches in height after blooming to encourage a clump of fresh new foliage.

* photos taken on April 13 2010 in Columbia, MD


* photo taken on April 12 2012 in Columbia, MD
* photos taken on April 20 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Apr 28 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Apr 30 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 6 2015 in Ellicott City, MD

* photo taken on May 6 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Apr 27 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 26 2017 in Columbia, MD

* historical archive photo


'Alba'
Pure white flowers but otherwise similar.

* photo taken on April 11 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum


* photos taken on May 5 2010 in Columbia, MD


* photo taken on May 16 2010 @ Cylburn Arboretum, Baltimore

* photo taken on April 12 2012 in Columbia, MD


'Gold Heart'
Vigorous growing, reaching up to 40 inches x 4 feet with glowing golden-yellow foliage contrasting with abundant, drooping, pink flowers.
Foliage is prone to burning in full sun.

* photo taken on April 11 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum



* photo taken on May 8 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


* photo taken on Apr 24 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


'Pantaloons'
More vigorous than regular Dicentra spectabilis

'Rosea'
Deep pink flowers.

'Valentine'
Vigorous in habit, reaching up to 2.5 feet in height.
The foliage is purplish-red at first, turning to gray-green yet still contrasting with deep red stems.
The flowers are deep red.

* photos taken on Apr 27 2015 in Elkridge, MD


Dicentra uniflora ( Steer's Head )
A perennial, reaching a maximum size of 2 x 1.5 feet, that is native to mountain slopes and subalpine meadows in western North America ( from Abbotsford, British Columbia to Vernon, British Columbia to northwest Wyoming; south to the Sierra Nevadas in California to Utah ).
The bipinnate leaves are deep green.
The flowers are very pale pink.

2 comments:

  1. Once again, a very thorough post. You even have Dicentra scandens, which grows in a friend's garden. I (heart) bleeding hearts. Thinking of getting 'burning hearts' soon, which one is your "can't live without Dicentra"?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you! Much appreciated! Just made a few updates including adding Dicentra 'Burning Hearts'

    ReplyDelete